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Nenad Medvidović
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 15-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3468744.3468748

Abstract:
A young software engineering researcher is invited to be an associate editor (AE) of a major journal in our field. The researcher is very excited. By this point, she has amassed a nice career track-record. She has also been recognized via a number of invitations to serve on our conferences' program committees. But this somehow feels different and more important: there are multiple conferences each year, and all of them have PCs staffed with dozens of members (not uncommonly over 100 in recent years), while there are comparatively fewer journals and, at any point in time, the sizes of their editorial boards are a fraction of a typical conference PC. This is a major additional sign of recognition of the young researcher's expertise and stature in the community. So, the researcher quickly and enthusiastically accepts the invitation.
Pu Yi, AnJiang Wei, Wing Lam, Tao Xie, Darko Marinov
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 37-41; https://doi.org/10.1145/3468744.3468756

Abstract:
Tests that modify (i.e., "pollute") the state shared among tests in a test suite are called \polluter tests". Finding these tests is im- portant because they could result in di erent test outcomes based on the order of the tests in the test suite. Prior work has proposed the PolDet technique for nding polluter tests in runs of JUnit tests on a regular Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Given that Java PathFinder (JPF) provides desirable infrastructure support, such as systematically exploring thread schedules, it is a worthwhile attempt to re-implement techniques such as PolDet in JPF. We present a new implementation of PolDet for nding polluter tests in runs of JUnit tests in JPF. We customize the existing state comparison in JPF to support the so-called \common-root iso- morphism" required by PolDet. We find that our implementation is simple, requiring only -200 lines of code, demonstrating that JPF is a sophisticated infrastructure for rapid exploration of re-search ideas on software testing. We evaluate our implementation on 187 test classes from 13 Java projects and nd 26 polluter tests. Our results show that the runtime overhead of [email protected] com- pared to base JPF is relatively low, on average 1.43x. However, our experiments also show some potential challenges with JPF.
Dennis Pagano, Walid Maalej
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 26-29; https://doi.org/10.1145/3468744.3468753

Abstract:
A decade ago, the rise of GitHub and StackOverflow as social version control and knowledge sharing environments was about to start. Social media like Twitter were mocked by some software engineering researchers and practitioners as "tools for kids not professionals". At that time, we published one of the first papers [12] on social media in software engineering at MSR 2011, the Mining Software Repositories Conference.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 7-7; https://doi.org/10.1145/3468744.3468745

Abstract:
Douglas Hofstadter's "Metamagical Themas: Questing for the Essence of Mind and Pattern" is not the Hofstadter book people probably expected to eventually turn up in a Passages column, to be honest. And I do not want to disparage his most famous work; I read Godel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid (GEB) one Christmas vacation, I believe when I was in the eighth grade, and it was a revelatory and enchanting experience, with a profound impact on the course of my future life. But everyone knows about that book, and has an opinion on it; I think it's a literary masterpiece and even when it gets something wrong, it does so in an interesting way.
Dietmar Pfahl
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 23-24; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448997

Abstract:
Lionel Briand is one of the five ACM Fellows of the 2020 cohort who are also active SIGSOFT members. To celebrate his award, we invited him to a question/answer session. Lionel is professor of software engineering and has shared appointments between the University of Ottawa and the University of Luxembourg. He holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) and an ERC Advanced grant. Over the last 25 years, Lionel has been an engineer, a researcher, a research institute department head, a research center leader, a university professor, and a consultant in the IT industry. His experience spans six countries and over the years he has run research and innovation projects with or worked for 30+ industry partners and public institutions. He has not only an impressive publication and research record as well as a long list of awards but also has served as editor-in-chef, editorial board member, steering committee member, general chair and program chair of top-level journals and conferences in the software engineering community.
Engineer Bainomugisha, Regina Hebig, Michel R. V. Chaudron
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 18-22; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448996

Abstract:
Software engineering (SE) researchers and research networks from emerging communities are often not visible in already established Software Engineering venues for a multitude of reasons. This limits the opportunities and mutual bene ts that can arise from collaborations between global and emerging Software Engineer- ing networks. This article focuses on a rst attempt to provide a map of the African software engineering research community with focus on the networks of two big East African Universities. We hope that this very initial mapping e ort will help to raise aware- ness in the international community about the variety of software engineering research in Africa. We formulate some suggestions for making our academic Software Engineering community more inclusive.
Steven Fraser, Dennis Mancl
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 25-27; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448998

Abstract:
The global COVID-19 pandemic has transformed the way we live, learn, and teach - impacting both "how we learn" and "what we learn." Software system resilience has emerged as a critical concept, a departure from historical system objectives obsessed with high performance. In practice, there are many situations when development focused on efficiency, creates a system that is not very resilient. Fortunately, some technology companies have prioritized stability and availability over efficiency in order to deliver to customers a more consistent experience. Governments also value resilience to reliably serve their communities in the face of crises like cyber hacking and COVID-19. System resilience is a topic often neglected in computer science curricula. This paper reports on a recent virtual ACM SPLASH-E Education Symposium panel session held in November 2020 that discussed resilience, efficiency, and the impact of COVID-19 on computer science education. The panel featured Steven Fraser (panel impresario) and panelists Rebecca Mercuri, Landon Noll, Ales Plsek, and Moshe Vardi.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 10-10; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448993

Abstract:
Brian Harvey's Computer Science Logo Style (Volume 1: Symbolic Computing, Volume 2: Advanced Techniques, Volume 3: Beyond Programming) begins with the words: "This book isn't for everyone." There follows a brief account of the fact that not everyone needs to program computers, based on an economic (Marxist-flavored) tirade (that I mostly agree with). The closing of the introductory paragraphs is the part that matters, though: "This book is for people who are interested in computer programming because it's fun."
Sherlock A. Licorish, Christoph Treude, John Grundy, Kelly Blincoe, Stephen MacDonell, Chakkrit Tantithamthavorn, Li Li, Jean-Guy Schneider
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 16-17; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448995

Abstract:
Six months ago an important call was made for researchers globally to provide insights into the way Software Engineering is done in their region. Heeding this call, we hereby outline the position Software Engineering in Australasia (New Zealand and Australia). This article first considers the software development methods, practices and tools that are popular in the Australasian software engineering community. We then briefly review the particular strengths of software engineering researchers in Australasia. Finally, we make an open call for collaborators by reflecting on our current position and identifying future opportunities.
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 11-15; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448994

Abstract:
Mini-editorial (PGN) 2020 was a crazy year, with all kinds of risks on display. As usual, many of the lessons noted in past issues of SEN and RISKS have been largely ignored, and failures continue to mirror events from the past that have long been discussed here. Issues such as safety, security, and reliability always seem to need more foresight than they receive. Y2K con- tinues to hit somewhere each New Year's Day, when short- term remediations that demanded periodic upgrading have been forgotten. (I suppose old COBOL code will still ex- ist in year 2100, when there may be ambiguities relating to dates that could be 21xx or 20xx (although 19xx is unlikely), and the narrow windowing xes will fail even more dramati- cally.) Election integrity continues to be a real concern, where we are caught in the crosshairs between computer systems and networks that are not meaningfully trustworthy or au- ditable, and the nontechnological risks are still pervasive from unbalanced redistricting, creative dysinformation, poli- tics, Citzens United, and foreign interference. We need non- partisan scrutiny and defense against would-be subverters to overcome potential attacks and inadvertent mistakes. In pres- ence of potential risks in every part of the process, a strong sense of risk-awareness is required by voters, election officials, and the media (both proactively and remedially, as needed).
Benoît Vanderose, Julie Henry, Benoît Frénay, Xavier Devroey
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 28-29; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3448999

Abstract:
In the past years, with the development and widespread of digi- tal technologies, everyday life has been profoundly transformed. The general public, as well as specialized audiences, have to face an ever-increasing amount of knowledge and learn new abilities. The EASEAI workshop series addresses that challenge by look- ing at software engineering, education, and arti cial intelligence research elds to explore how they can be combined. Speci cally, this workshop brings together researchers, teachers, and practi- tioners who use advanced software engineering tools and arti cial intelligence techniques in the education eld and through a trans- generational and transdisciplinary range of students to discuss the current state of the art and practices, and establish new future directions. More information at https://easeai.github.io.
Rui Abreu, Shaukat Ali, Tao Yue
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 30-32; https://doi.org/10.1145/3448992.3449000

Abstract:
The First International Workshop on Quantum Software Engineering (Q-SE 2020), co-located with the 42nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2020), was held between July 2 and July 3, 2020. The workshop was originally scheduled to be a physical event in May 2020. Due to the SARS-CoV-2, aligned with the main conference, the workshop was held virtually instead. This report summarizes the keynote speeches, the paper presentations in the workshop, and the ensuing discussions. IEEE and ACM publish the proceedings of the workshop as part of the ICSE 2020 Workshops Companion.
Davide Fucci, Hidetake Uwano
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 28-29; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437487

Abstract:
A ective computing studies and develops both systems and de- vices to recognize, interpret, process, and simulate human a ect| i.e., the experience of feelings or emotions. Software engineering involves people in a broad range of activities (from requirements to validation) where personality, moods, and emotions play a crucial role. Recently, researchers have started to study the role of af- fective computing and a ective states in software engineering but contributions on this topic are presented and discussed in diverse conferences and workshops. The SEmotion workshop follows on the fourth edition held at ICSE 2019, towards the consolidation of an international, sustainable forum for researchers and practition- ers interested in the role of a ects in software engineering to meet, present, and discuss their work-in-progress. SEmotion showcases contributions about empirical methods for emotions detection in software engineering, theoretical models inspired by neighboring elds, as well as ad-hoc tools for supporting emotion awareness in software development. This paper presents and overview of the fth edition of the workshop.
Dusica Marijan, Thomas Zimmermann, Myungjoo Ham, Bran Selic
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 30-32; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437488

Abstract:
There is a long-standing challenge to narrow the gap between software engineering research and industrial practice. This gap is reinforced by a number of challenges, including differing timelines, metrics, expectations, and perceptions of these two communities. We believe that these and other related challenges need be analyzed and discussed, to discover synergies and strengthen collaborations between researchers and practitioners in software engineering. In this report, we present insights from the 7th International Workshop on Software Engineering Research and Industrial Practice held virtually at the International Conference on Software Engineering 2020.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 9-12; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437481

Abstract:
Henry Petroski's The Pencil is one of Henry Petroski's many, always both scholarly and literary, and, most importantly, always engaging, books on engineering theory, practice, and history. For the software engineer, the pencil has a special place; while software engineers are not, particularly more than anyone else, pencil- users these days, we do have a special emphasis on sketching and the development of engineering tools, and one major thread of Petroski's history of the art of pencil-making is the use of pencils as an essential tool for engineers.
Shin Yoo, Aldeida Aleti, Burak Turhan, Leandro L. Minku, Andriy Miranskyy, Çetin Meriçli
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 23-24; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437485

Abstract:
The International Workshop on Realizing Arti cial Intelligence Synergies in Software Engineering (RAISE) aims to present the state of the art in the crossover between Software Engineering and Arti cial Intelligence. This workshop explored not only the appli- cation of AI techniques to SE problems but also the application of SE techniques to AI problems. Software has become critical for realizing functions central to our society. For example, software is essential for nancial and transport systems, energy generation and distribution systems, and safety-critical medical applications. Software development costs trillions of dollars each year yet, still, many of our software engineering methods remain mostly man- ual. If we can improve software production by smarter AI-based methods, even by small margins, then this would improve a crit- ical component of the international infrastructure, while freeing up tens of billions of dollars for other tasks.
Emad Shihab, Stefan Wagner, Marco Aurélio Gerosa
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 20-22; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437484

Abstract:
Bots automate many tasks in software engineering projects often in the form of chatbots. Bots have been proposed, for example, for testing, maintenance, or automating bug fixes. Following the success of the first BotSE workshop, we organized this second edition collocated with ICSE 2020 to bring together the research community that investigates bots for software engineering. Specifically, the workshop's goal was to share experiences and challenges, discuss new types of bots, and map out future directions. The workshop program comprised the presentation of 8 papers and 2 keynotes, followed by extensive discussion. Overall, the community matured by discussing how to design, build, and evaluate bots. The community aims to organise a 3rd edition of the workshop. Website: http://botse.org/
Jacopo Soldani
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 8-8; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437480

Abstract:
The "Pains and Gains of Peer-Reviewing in Software Engineering" column of SEN aims at fostering a constructive and stimulating discussion on peer-reviewing in software engineering venues. This fourth editorial introduces a new contribution to the column, which reports on the recently released ACM SIGSOFT Empirical Standards for evaluating specific kinds of studies.
Paul Ralph
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 19-19; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437483

Abstract:
In October 2020, The ACM SIGSOFT Paper and Peer Review Quality Task Force released its first empirical standards. An empirical standard is "a brief public document that communicates expectations for a specific kind of study (e.g. a questionnaire survey)" [1]. (All quotations below are from the Empirical Standards report [1] unless otherwise noted.)
Julie Dugdale, Mahyar T. Moghaddam, Henry Muccini
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 33-36; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437489

Abstract:
The increasing natural and man-induced disasters such as res, earthquakes, oods, hurricanes, overcrowding, or pandemic viruses endanger human lives. Hence, designing infrastructures to handle those possible crises has become an ever-increasing need. The Internet of Things (IoT) has changed our approach to safety systems by connecting sensors and providing real-time data to managers, rescuers, and endangered people. IoT systems can monitor and react to progressive disasters, people's movements and their behavioral patterns. The community faces challenges in using IoT for crises management: i) how to take advantage of technological advancements and deal with IoT resources installation issues? ii) what environmental contexts should be considered while designing IoT-based emergency handling systems? iii) how should system design comply with various levels of real-time requirements? This paper reports on the results of the First International Workshop on Internet of Things for Emergency Management (IoT4Emergency 2020), which speci cally focuses on challenges and envisioned solutions in using smart connected systems to handle disasters.
Marco Konersmann, Brian Fitzgerald, Michael Goedicke, Helena Holmström Olsson, Jan Bosch, Stephan Krusche
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 25-27; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437486

Abstract:
We need to built software rapidly and with a high quality. These goals seem to be contradictory, but actually, implementing automation in build and deployment procedures as well as quality analysis can improve both the development pace and the resulting quality at the same time. Rapid Continuous Software Engineering describes novel software engineering approaches that focus on short release cycles, continuous deployment, delivery, and continuous improvement through rapid tool-assisted feedback to developers. To realize these approaches there is a need for research and innovation with respect to automation and tooling, and furthermore for research into the organizational changes that support high pace development. This paper reports on the results of the 6th International Workshop on Rapid Continuous Software Engineering (RCoSE 2020), which focuses on the challenges and potential solutions in the area of Rapid Continuous Software Engineering, before reporting on our discussions regarding the state of the practice and open research topics.
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 46, pp 13-18; https://doi.org/10.1145/3437479.3437482

Abstract:
Edited by PGN (Risks Forum Moderator, with contribu- tions by others as indicated. Opinions are individual rather than organizational, with usual disclaimers implied. We ad- dress problems relating to software, hardware, people, and other circumstances relevant to computer systems. Ref- erences (R i j) to the online Risks Forum denote RISKS vol i number j. Cited RISKS items generally identify contributors and sources, together with URLs. Official RISKS archives are available at www.risks.org, with nice html formatting and search engine courtesy of Lindsay Mar- shall at Newcastle:; http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/i.j.html (also ftp://www.sri.com/risks). CACM Inside Risks: http://www.csl.sri.com/neumann/insiderisks.html Mini-editorial (PGN) This is now my 45th year with involvement in SEN. When can I quit? Sadly, the risks continue to be pervasive, and avoiding them is highly relevant to what principled software/system engineering should entail. We need ap- proaches to systems that consider trustworthiness as a col- lection of -ilities all of which can be critical, and which in many cases are intricately related; they cannot be solved in isolation. Trustworthiness requires reliablity, security, and much more especially when human safety is in- volved. And every system is likely to have critical aws that can be exploited or triggered accidentally. My Octo- ber 2020 CACM Inside Risks column, A Holistic View of Fu- ture Risks (http://www.csl.sri.com/neumann/cacm250.pdf) attempts to illustrate some of that. If you have not seen it, I would welcome some feedback.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417565

Abstract:
Robert K. Merton's On the Shoulders of Giants: A Shandean Postscript - The Post-Italianate Edition, or, henceforth, OTSOG, is our (ostensible) topic for this issue's Passages column. [[What follows after this double-bracketed 'introduction' is a failure, an attempt to recommend this book by, in miniature, aping its style and form. In my opinion, it doesn't really work. I ask the reader who has ever enjoyed a book read because it was recommended in this column to bear with me through it, however, for there is a point to be made, and a remarkable book to recommend.
Mauro Pezzè
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 19-21; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417569

Abstract:
A sound review process is critical in contemporary scientific communities. The current discussion on peer review in the software engineering community is centered mainly around conferences, and focuses mostly on 'implementation' issues, like blind reviews, rebuttals, deadlines, with little attention to the ultimate goal of the review process, the external conditions that bias the process, and the role of journals. In this short note, I would like to remind the community that review is a means not the goal. I overview the goals of reviews, discuss process and environment biases, highlight advantages and limitations of the current approaches, compare the review processes of conferences and journals, and present my vision about a possible healthy evolution of software engineering conferences and journals.
Robert M. Hierons, Tao Xie
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 18-18; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417568

Abstract:
In this short article, we discuss perspectives on issues related to peer reviewing in software engineering journals and conferences. These perspectives are based on our experiences, which have been informed by being authors, reviewers, conference organisers, members of journal editorial boards, and also co-editors-in-chief of a journal, i.e., The Journal of Software Testing, Verification and Reliability (STVR).
Paolo Tell, David Raffo, Liguo Huang, Igor Steinmacher, Ricardo Britto, Eray Tüzün, Paul Clarke
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 31-34; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3429719

Abstract:
Having the common objective of bringing together researchers and industry practitioners to share their research ndings, experiences, and new ideas as well as sharing topics of interest, the organizing committees of the 14th International Conference on Software and System Processes (ICSSP) and the 15th International Conference on Global Software Engineering (ICGSE) ceased the opportunity to explore the idea of bringing together the two communities once it was clear that the International Conference on Software Engineering and all its co-located events had to be redesigned as online events.
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 11-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417566

Abstract:
Edited by PGN (Risks Forum Moderator, with contribu- tions by others as indicated. Opinions are individual rather than organizational, with usual disclaimers implied. We ad- dress problems relating to software, hardware, people, and other circumstances relevant to computer systems. Ref- erences (R i j) to the online Risks Forum denote RISKS vol i number j. Cited RISKS items generally identify contributors and sources, together with URLs. Official RISKS archives are available at www.risks.org, with nice html formatting and search engine courtesy of Lindsay Mar- shall at Newcastle:; http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/i.j.html (also ftp://www.sri.com/risks). CACM Inside Risks: http://www.csl.sri.com/neumann/insiderisks.html
Jacopo Soldani
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 17-17; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417567

Abstract:
The 'Pains and Gains of Peer-Reviewing in Software Engineering' column of SEN aims at fostering a constructive and stimulating discussion on peer-reviewing in software engineering venues. This third editorial introduces two new contributions to the column, providing the positions and perspectives by the Editors-in-Chief of two internationally renowned software engineering journals.
William B. Langdon, Westley Weimer, Justyna Petke, Erik Fredericks, Seongmin Lee, Emily Winter, Michail Basios, Myra B. Cohen, Aymeric Blot, Markus Wagner, et al.
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 24-30; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417575

Abstract:
Following Prof. Mark Harman of Facebook's keynote and formal presentations (which are recorded in the proceed- ings) there was a wide ranging discussion at the eighth inter- national Genetic Improvement workshop, GI-2020 @ ICSE (held as part of the International Conference on Software En- gineering on Friday 3rd July 2020). Topics included industry take up, human factors, explainabiloity (explainability, jus- tifyability, exploitability) and GI benchmarks. We also con- trast various recent online approaches (e.g. SBST 2020) to holding virtual computer science conferences and workshops via the WWW on the Internet without face to face interac- tion. Finally we speculate on how the Coronavirus Covid-19 Pandemic will a ect research next year and into the future.
Roberto Di Cosmo
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 22-23; https://doi.org/10.1145/3417564.3417570

Abstract:
Software, and software source code in particular, is widely used in modern research. It must be properly archived, referenced, described and cited in order to build a stable and long lasting corpus of scienti c knowledge. And yet, up to now there was no speci c support for citing software in the popular BibTeX format that we use for our bibliographies. We got used to work around this lack of dedicated support by tweaking the @misc entry, citing the user manual, or an article related to a software artifact, or adding in the text or in a footnote urls pointing to a place where one could get the software: the project web page, or a code hosting platform. These workaround were a manifestation of the fact that software artifacts themselves were not considered rst class citizen in the scholarly world. With the recent raise of interest on reproducibility of research re- sults, from Artifact Evaluation Committees to the ACM Badges, we have started moving towards giving nally software the aca- demic dignity it deserves.
Greg Wilson
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 21-22; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402136

Abstract:
I was honored to receive ACM SIGSOFT's Influential Educator Award1 for 2020 this past April. I was also surprised: while I think I've helped scientists through Software Carpentry and other projects, nothing I've done in the last twenty years seems to have had much influence on software engineering. It isn't for lack of trying. In the early 2000s I began teaching classes at the University of Toronto. One was titled "Software Architecture", and after three very frustrating offerings I told the department they should cancel it. The problem was that the half-dozen textbooks I read with "software architecture" in their titles spent hundreds of pages explaining how to elicit architectural requirements and how to document architectures, but devoted less than 20 pages in total to describing actual systems. Students memorized what I put in front of them and passed their exams, but it had no impact on how they thought or what they built.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 4-5; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402129

Abstract:
Federico Biancuzzi and Shane Warden's Masterminds of Programming: Conversations with the Creators of Major Programming Languages is a treasure. The book consists of interviews with the creators of, in order, C++, Python, APL, Forth, BASIC, AWK, Lua, Haskell, ML, SQL, Objective C, Java, C#, UML, Perl, PostScript, and Eiffel. Each chapter asks similar, but not identical questions, and the above-mentioned masterminds, including Larry Wall, James Gosling, Brian Kernighan, Bertrand Meyer, Robin Milner, Simon Peyton-Jones, Guido van Rossum, and Bjarne Stroustrop give a wide variety of answers. Some of the masterminds are charming, and many are contentious, even cranky; they are also, almost all, full of deep insights into the deepest problems of software engineering. This insight comes in two forms; first, programming languages are the mechanisms by which software engineering solutions are almost always produced. Second, perhaps even more importantly, creating and evolving a widely-used programming language is a heroic, Herculean, critical software engineering task. All of these masterminds have succeeded in a massive software engineering task; they are not mere ivory tower thinkers about software engineering, but have, in some cases, entire lives shaped by a single, extremely complex, software project. More on that key point below.
Ivica Crnkovic, Karina Kohl Silveira, Sara Sprenkle
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 25-27; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402138

Abstract:
The 2nd Workshop on Gender Equality in Software Engineering was a continuation of the first workshop with a goal to increase awareness of gender-related challenges in Software Engineering community. Further the workshop's goals were to illuminate the problem in a variety of contexts, evaluate proposed solutions, discuss approaches to move towards gender equality, and to develop a community to support meaningful change in gender equality in software engineering. In its second year, the workshop featured a keynote from ACM-W president Jodi Tims, ten papers, two posters on work-in-progress, and a fivemember panel. Jodi Tims presented principles and best practices of work to improve the gender balance. Paper topics focused on gender in computer science in a variety of domains, including in education, parenting, and industry, and on creating inclusive environments, including in open source. The panel discussed particularly difficult challenges-including the potential bias of data that is used by artificial intelligence to make decisions-and how aggressive institutions can be to make meaningful change. Thirty-eight people from seventeen countries participated in the workshop, and even more people were reached via Twitter.
Engineer Bainomugisha, Regina Hebig, Michel Chaudron
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 18-20; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402135

Abstract:
The software industry is a key engine of economic growth in Africa, which calls for sustainable and innovative approaches to build capacities in software engineering research and education for the continent. This paper presents the BRIGHT project as an example for a collaboration that aims to build such capacity. The collaboration includes institutions in Sweden and Uganda. The goal of the collaboration is to train faculty in software en- gineering and to build a supporting research environment, which includes the creation of networks with the software engineering community at a global scale as well as connecting academia and the local software industry. So far, the project has resulted in 50 publications, a software engineering research centre, software engineering summer schools, and conferences.
Jacopo Soldani
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 15-15; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402132

Abstract:
The standard approach for evaluating scientific contributions by software engineering venues is peer-reviewing. Papers submitted for consideration by a venue are sent to peers (i.e., expert colleagues in the field), who carefully read them and provide corresponding evaluation reports, i.e., the peer reviews. Peer-reviewing comes in various alternative forms, as discussed in the teaser column of this series [1]. The teaser also pointed out some questions currently motivating discussion within the software engineering community: Which is the "best" among currently adopted peer-reviewing alternatives? Would it be better to have zero-blind, single-blind, or double-blind reviews? How many, and which stages should be involved in the process of peer-reviewing? Are currently adopted peer-reviewing processes sustainable in the long run? These are just a few examples of questions setting up the discussion, with many other questions outside there and yet to come.
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 6-11; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402130

Abstract:
Edited by PGN (Risks Forum Moderator, with contribu- tions by others as indicated. Opinions are individual rather than organizational, with usual disclaimers implied. We ad- dress problems relating to software, hardware, people, and other circumstances relevant to computer systems. Ref- erences (R i j) to the online Risks Forum denote RISKS vol i number j. Cited RISKS items generally identify contributors and sources, together with URLs. Official RISKS archives are available at www.risks.org, with nice html formatting and search engine courtesy of Lindsay Mar- shall at Newcastle:; http://catless.ncl.ac.uk/Risks/i.j.html (also ftp://www.sri.com/risks). CACM Inside Risks: http://www.csl.sri.com/neumann/insiderisks.html
Rachel Tzoref
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 23-24; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402137

Abstract:
Combinatorial test design (CTD) [1] is an effective test design technique, considered to be a testing best practice. CTD provides automatic test plan generation, but it requires a manual definition of the test space in the form of a combinatorial model, consisting of parameters, their respective values, and constraints on the value combinations. A valid test in the test space is defined to be an assignment of one value to each parameter that satisfies the constraints. A CTD algorithm automatically constructs a subset of the set of valid tests, termed a test plan, which covers all valid value combinations of every t parameters, where t is usually a user input. Such a test plan is said to achieve 100% t-way interaction coverage. A significant combinatorial reduction is achieved in the size of the resulting test plan (compared to manually designed test plans for example) because the tests generated by the CTD algorithm are very different from one another, maximizing their added value -- each of them covers as many unique t-way value tuples as possible. Note that tests produced by the algorithm are parameter-value assignments. Generating executable tests from them is often a separate, manual effort.
Mario Piattini, Guido Peterssen, Ricardo Pérez-Castillo
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 12-14; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402131

Abstract:
Quantum computing, and to an even greater extent quantum technology, is changing the world. Quantum computing is not an evolution of classical computer science; it is actually a revolution that completely changes the computing paradigm. Quantum computers are based on the principles of quantum mechanics, such as superposition and entanglement, and they seek to boost computational power exponentially. Many problems that have until now been impossible to solve, in practical terms, might very well be able to be addressed by means of quantum computing. The fact is that at the present time quantum computing is influencing most business sectors and research fields, due to its various promising applications. To make such applications become reality, quantum algorithms must be specially coded for these extremely different computers. Although some well-known quantum algorithms already exist, the need for quantum software will increase dramatically in the next years. In that context, quantum software has to be produced in a more industrial and controlled way, i.e., aspects such as quality, delivery, project management, or evolution of quantum software must be addressed. We are sure that quantum computing will be the main driver for a new software engineering golden age during the present decade of the 2020s.
Marco Kuhrmann, Dietmar Pfahl, Jacopo Soldani
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 17-17; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402134

Abstract:
Software engineering is a key discipline in computer science. Its purpose is to develop software products and services of high quality within economic constraints that meet customer requirements and create value. Considerable shares of the societal and industrial infrastructure depend on software, and software has become a key driver for innovation. So far, so good, but who shapes software engineering, who defines what the problems to be solved look like, and who decides about the importance of certain streams in software engineering research and practice? Furthermore, is software engineering in the USA or in Europe the same as, e.g., software engineering in Oceania or Africa? In this new column Software Engineering Worldwide, we aim to provide an overview of software engineering, its importance and its manifestation, in different regions worldwide. We wish to take a look behind the scenes to learn about the different environments and the respective key problems to be addressed in "local" software engineering research, practice, and education. We also aim to open the minds of the community regarding the involvement of new locations not yet on the software engineering map, and to stimulate constructive discussion on how to better involve such locations.
Lutz Prechelt, Daniel Graziotin, Daniel Mendez
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 16-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402133

Abstract:
Peer review in software engineering is considered, same as for other disciplines, to be a key element of the research process, yet it is often perceived as not to work fully well. To understand the pains and gains in the peer review system, we ran a survey with open and closed questions with the authors and PC members of ICSE 2014/2015/2016. We received 241 responses (29% response rate). 67% of the respondents identified themselves as professors. We analyzed the responses quantitatively and qualitatively (with open coding). All questions were optional. Agreement scales had 10 points, so mild levels of agreement could be expressed but there was no undecided middle point. The resulting article appeared in Information and Software Technology in 2018 [1] and we also disclosed the anonymized data set [2].
Saurabh Tiwari, Sheikh Umar Farooq, Ranjith Tharayil, Paramvir Singh
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 28-35; https://doi.org/10.1145/3402127.3402139

Abstract:
This experience report presents the summary, outcomes and experiences of the 2nd Workshop on Emerging Software Engineering Education (WESEE), co-located with Innovations in Software Engineering Conference (ISEC 2019) which was held on 14th February 2019 at College of Engineering, Pune (India). WESEE is an activity-oriented workshop and consists of an expert talk, two hands-on activities, and an open discussion session. We have collected a variety of data from the participants while conducting the two activities namely, 'wall of ideas' and 'design thinking'. We analyze the data gathered in the form of sticky notes, responses to worksheets, documented ideas, and feedback sheets. The data helped us to determine whether the workshop was successful and simultaneously we can plan for the next edition of the workshop by incorporating the feedback.
Cyrille Artho, Quoc-Sang Phan, Peter Aldous, Alyas Almaawi, Lucas Bang, Lasse Berglund, Tevfik Bultan, Zhenbang Chen, Hayes Converse, Wei Dong, et al.
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 20-22; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385685

Abstract:
Java Path nder (JPF) was originally developed as an explicit- state software model checker, and subsequently evolved into an extensible Java bytecode analysis framework that has been suc- cessfully used to implement techniques such as symbolic and con- colic execution, compositional veri cation, parallel execution, in- cremental program analysis, and many more. To share recent research progress with JPF and related tools among the community, we have organized the annual JPF work- shop with the Automated Software Engineering Conference (ASE) 2019, held in San Diego, California, USA. We invited submissions about on-going and existing research, experience, and position papers on topics (1) related to JPF, its extensions and applica- tions in various domains; and (2) Java/Android program analysis in general. This paper gives an overview of all presentations and papers of the workshop, as well the results of the discussions.
Jacopo Soldani
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 6-6; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385688

Abstract:
Peer-reviewing constitutes the reference mechanism for assuring the quality of scientific contributions in software engineering. In the teaser of this column series (i.e., [1]) we provided an overview of the current trends for peer reviewing in software engineering, including experienced pains and gains.
Alex Groce
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 3-4; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385679

Abstract:
John McPhee's Basin and Range, the first of his geology books usually read in a collection as the (sized rather like a large rock itself) Annals of the Former World is a funny choice for a Passages classic, at first glance. Maybe at second glance too, come to think of it. Basin and Range is a travelogue, haphazard intro textbook on plate tectonics, and a meditation on the Earth, its age, and the rocks that give us some clue to almost utterly alien worlds that once occupied the space we now inhabit. Lava flows, trilobites, ancient seas, and primordial continents; the great extinctions that bookend geological periods of time, what does this all have to do with software engineering?
Jürgen Cito, Mark Santolucito
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 23-24; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385686

Abstract:
Errors in con gurations, rather than source code, have become one of the major causes of system failures, resulting in security vulnerabilities, application outages, and incorrect program execu- tions. We report on the structure and results of the rst Interna- tional Workshop on Software Engineering for Infrastructure and Con guration Code. Our aim in organizing this jworkshop was to
Peter G. Neumann
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 7-12; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385682

Abstract:
Boeing 737s can't land facing west (FAA via Clive D.W. Feather, R 31 56) The FAA received reports earlier this year of three incidents of display electronic unit (DEU) software errors on Model 737 NG airplanes ying into runway PABR in Barrow, Alaska. All six display units (DUs) blanked with a selected instru- ment approach to a runway with a 270-degree true heading, and all six DUs stayed blank until a di erent runway was selected. [...] The investigation revealed that the problem occurs when this combination of software is installed and a susceptible runway with a 270-degree true heading is selected for instrument approach. Not all runways with a 270-degree true heading are susceptible; only seven runways worldwide, as identi ed in this AD, have latitude and longitude values that cause the blanking behavior. (Note that this is all 6 dis- plays on each plane, not 2 displays on each of three planes.) (R 31 54). [More items later on polar coordinates, tangent of 90 and 270 being plus-minus in nity, etc. (R 31 56,57)
Paul Ralph, Romain Robbes
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 17-18; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385681

Abstract:
Scholarly peer review is crucial to science: it not only determines what is published where, but also, indirectly, who is hired, funded and promoted. Yet, virtually every academic has peer review horror stories. Empirical evidence suggests that "peer review is prejudiced, capricious, inefficient, ineffective, and generally unscientific" [1]. An experiment at a major machine learning conference found that peer review was unreliable highlighted that the outcome of peer review can be very noisy [2, 3]. In May 2019, ACM SIGSOFT launched an initiative to improve the quality of research papers and peer reviews at software engineering venues. It has two main components: empirical standards and recommendations for improving review processes.
Robert Schaefer
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 13-16; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385683

Abstract:
"...the step from not being able to do something at all to being able to do it a little bit is very much smaller than the next step - being able to do it well. In AI, this fallacious thinking seems to be all pervasive" -- Bar- Hillel.
Nan Niu
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 19-19; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385684

Abstract:
ACM SIGSOFT, via its CAPS program, supports students and professionals to attend conferences in software engineering and related fields. This report summarizes the conference experiences from CAPS awardees of ASE 2019, and introduces a recent initiative to broaden the CAPS travel support for professionals (e.g., junior researchers and faculty members).
Thomas Erl, Robert Cope, Amin Naserpour
ACM SIGSOFT Software Engineering Notes, Volume 45, pp 27-27; https://doi.org/10.1145/3385678.3385690

Abstract:
Cloud Computing Design Patterns is written by Thomas Erl, Robert Cope, and Amin Naserpour, and published by Prentice Hall, © 2015, 978-0-13-385856-3, and is 591 pages long. The "Objective of This Book" section sets a lofty goal to catalog design patterns for cloud computing, targeting IT professionals who are involved in architecting, building, maintaining, evolving cloud-based solutions and environments. Since that fits squarely in the middle of my "day job", I was really excited to get my hands on this book.
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