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Results in Journal Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies: 561

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, Moritz Stock
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211044821

Abstract:
This article discusses online media’s contribution to the youthification of television through the case study of DRUCK (tr. Pressure, 2018–), the German format adaptation of SKAM (tr. Shame, 2015–17). Youthification is understood as the television industry’s attempts to reach and win back teen and tween viewers with strategies in production, representations, aesthetics and distribution. In DRUCK, online media are integral to the youthification in all these strategies. Our multifaceted analysis of this serial combines perspectives from media industry studies to investigate production strategies, sociological analysis of film and television to examine the thematic and narrative choices and theories of transmedia storytelling to make sense of the specific distribution choices.
, Cathy Yue Wang
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211046378

Abstract:
This article examines the representation of girlfriendship (Winch A (2013) Girlfriends and Postfeminist Sisterhood. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan) in the Chinese TV series Ode to Joy (2016–2017), and in particular, its representation of the interactions between urban women’s competence, experience of romance, postfeminist identity and class status in the Chinese gender context. Drawing on Winch’s concepts of ‘strategic sisterhood’ and the ‘girlfriend gaze’, we first explore how female friendship relies on networks of exchange in terms of economy, career and/or emotion, and then investigate the ways in which young women mutually monitor each other’s personal relationships to ensure their heterosexuality in society as a group.
Yeşim Kaptan
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211046333

Abstract:
This article investigates how Turkish audiences conceptualize authenticity in their engagement with foreign television (TV) productions in the case of Danish TV dramas. The theoretical notion of authenticity is juxtaposed with empirical material from fieldwork interactions, focus group interviews, and one-on-one interviews conducted with Turkish audiences between 2016 and 2018. By employing a semiotic analysis of fieldwork data, I argue that Turkish audiences attribute authenticity to the Danish TV drama series according to a socially created modality (truth value of a sign). This article draws on accounts about modality markers in TV drama series such as authentic portrayals of Danish TV characters and plausible-realistic depictions as a verisimilitudinous representation of everyday life. In the context of cross-cultural television viewing practices, the way Turkish audiences attribute meaning to Danish TV series in terms of authenticity, realism, and modality reveals a distinct differentiation between Danish TV dramas and other nationally and globally circulating media products.
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211044918

Abstract:
Interviews with industry workers and decision-makers are a critical method in television studies. Yet, one group of informants proves particularly hard to access – representatives from global media platforms. Why is it so hard to get interviews with global platform representatives, and what does the lack of access do to our research and scholarly debate?
Adelaida Afilipoaie, Catalina Iordache, Tim Raats
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 304-325; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211023318

Abstract:
The European audiovisual market has unique contextual characteristics that constrain the sustainability and development of audiovisual content. Among other shifts, the rise of global subscription video-on-demand players like Netflix have been reshaping this market. Although Netflix has been investing in Europe, little is known about their actual investment strategies. This study’s goal is to analyse Netflix original investment in European scripted series and examine their implications for the European market. Based on a mapping of all European Netflix Originals, we identify four investment patterns. The analysis shows a significant uptake of Netflix investment, yet concurrently these reinforce existing discrepancies between large and small states in Europe.
Kristyn Gorton
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 227-244; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211021326

Abstract:
This article explores the tension that lies in the construction of resilience, which is at once, hopeful and inspiring and yet also in danger of positioning the individual as responsible for the lack of welfare and support that is available. In articulating these contradictory readings, I treat The Handmaid’s Tale as a ‘site where the meaning of feminism(s) is produced and contested’ (Ferreday and Harris, 2017: 240) and as a television text whose storytelling techniques reflect what Jason Mittell (2015) refers to as ‘narrative complexity’.
Jolien van Keulen
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 286-303; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211020312

Abstract:
TV formats provide an excellent lens to study the transnationalisation of television, but actual format production has rarely been examined. This article discusses three interrelated limitations of current format scholarship: (1) a gap between industrial and textual studies; (2) a selective focus on localisation; and (3) a lack of insight into daily practices of format production. Using the Flemish adaptation of The Great British Bake Off ( 2010 –2016, 2017–present) as a case study and drawing on participant observations, this article analyses transnational power dynamics in the TV industry and the meaning of the format on the micro-level of TV production.
Kim Akass
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 333-335; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211015463c

Jp Kelly
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 264-285; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211024201

Abstract:
Video-on-demand (VOD) interfaces have become a ubiquitous feature of contemporary screen culture. But despite their prevalence and the significant amount of time we spend in these liminal spaces, these interfaces are – within the field of TV studies at least – relatively under-theorised and rarely the subject of focused critical interrogation. Indeed, it has been noted that there are simply ‘no established methodologies in TV studies for studying interfaces’ (Johnson, 2017: 124). In addressing this methodological gap, this article develops and demonstrates an empirical and quantitative approach to the analysis of television VOD interfaces, taking its cue from ‘distant reading’ ( Moretti, 2013 ).
Mark Bernhardt
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 245-263; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211023865

Abstract:
This article argues that while reliant on Latinx stereotypes in character construction, Breaking Bad (2008–2013) ultimately uses them to problematise American racial categories and conquest mythology. Comparing stereotyped Latinx criminals to the main white character, Walter White (Bryan Cranston), who claims difference, reveals that they share traits. In its use of Latinx stereotypes to transfer focus from difference to sameness, Breaking Bad shifts the imperial gaze to offer a critical view of the regeneration through violence myth, so integral to American western expansionism and central in Walt’s story, in that he dies in his attempt to regenerate by killing his Latinx enemies.
, Ana C Uribe Sandoval
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211037259

Abstract:
This article examines the discourses of streaming success within the television industry by focusing on Netflix and two of the service’s original series: Fauda and La Casa de Papel. Using publicly available secondary data through 2019, this analysis argues the transnational platform’s efforts to redefine successful television while maintaining a high level of data secrecy necessitate the discursive construction of a global and undifferentiated audience. Yet, rather than representing a break with the past, the discourses of streaming success reveal Netflix to be a television institution attempting to address traditional industry challenges.
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 126-144; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602021996536

Abstract:
This article investigates how platformisation changes the practices of content production and distribution through the case of the web series, Druck (tr. Pressure (2018–), for the public service content network ‘funk’ (ARD and ZDF). An analysis of the German adaptation of the Norwegian television and web series Skam (tr. Shame) (NRK3, 2015–2017) shows how public service broadcasting (PSB) in Germany is changing due to the influence of social media. To reach a younger audience, PSB has to meet them on third-party platforms. Consequently, PSB must provide content that fits the mobile media environment of social media.
, , Rigas Kotsakis, Theodora A Maniou, George Kalliris
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 91-109; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211005395

Abstract:
Post-crisis Greece is experiencing dynamic audiovisual market growth, faster than the EU average. As Greek TV responds to the challenges of the streaming era, new paths are forged by young viewers/users. This article, based on a survey of nearly 1,000 students, attempts to characterise the viewing patterns of young audiences, who are early adopters and heavy consumers of streaming television. We argue that whereas young Greek media users favour streaming platforms, they value the social character of traditional television, which plays a prominent role in post-crisis Greece. Young media users’ screen behaviour can be described as mobility-centred and algorithmically naïve.
Naomi Sakr,
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 181-195; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211004102

Abstract:
This paper starts from the premise that research into how producers negotiate issues of diversity and multicultural content in Europe is rare and mostly relies on interviews and documents, and furthermore work on understanding those negotiation processes in relation to children’s screen content is even rarer. The article seeks to reflect critically on an alternative hybrid research method, which aims to open up a space for dialogue about production processes and was applied in three workshops about children’s content and forced migration that the authors ran with content creators and broadcasters of children’s screen content in 2017–2018.
Judith Fathallah
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 218-220; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602021996843d

Berber Hagedoorn, Susanne Eichner, Juan Francisco Gutiérrez Lozano
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 83-90; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211011804

, Katrine Bouschinger Christensen
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 163-180; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211005999

Abstract:
This article explores the strategies for fictional content of the Danish children’s channel DR Ultra through a qualitative case study of the production framework behind its successful series Klassen (2016–now). Building on studies of television production and theories of co-creation, the analysis investigates the use of co-creative initiatives during the development and writing as well as the production of programmes. The analysis highlights the value of involving children more closely in content targeting them, not only to ensure that what is told and how it is told is relevant and appealing, but also to create a sense of participation and co-creation.
Ulla Autenrieth, Matthias Künzler, Fiona Fehlmann
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 110-125; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602021998238

Abstract:
Public service media (PSM) are still seen in most European countries as a core means of informing citizens of all ages. Nevertheless, PSM struggle to reach young audiences, who are often characterised as news-avoidant or news-deprived. This article asks what meaning the news and information offered by PSM have for young people. The qualitative study describes young people’s attitudes and expectations regarding audiovisual news and information content through observation of their media usage habits in an experimental setting. It provides insights regarding how young people find and select news in today’s digital media environment and highlights opportunities for PSM providers to reach and engage with young audiences more effectively.
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 145-162; https://doi.org/10.1177/17496020211005311

Abstract:
This article explores the ‘youthification’ of television through real-time storytelling. It draws on a study of the online youth drama blank (2018–2019), NRK’s first follow-up after the hit show SKAM (2015–2017). It finds that real-time drama brings unique opportunities to broadcasters aiming to reconnect with younger audiences, but also substantial challenges. This insight is essential, as previous studies have highlighted the format’s advantages while downplaying its problems and dilemmas. Furthermore, the article emphasises the continuous need for innovation in youth storytelling, especially at public service broadcasters with the mandate and ability to do so.
Mary Irwin
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 216-218; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602021996843c

Matthew Sorrento
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 214-216; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602021996843b

Elke Weissmann, Stephen Lacey, Janet McCabe
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 3-6; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020986018

Christine Geraghty
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 78-80; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020980535d

Stephanie Patrick
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 30-46; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020976914

Abstract:
Across four seasons of her Netflix hit comedy, Kimmy Schmidt emerged as a strong, female survivor of sexual violence. However, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt would often walk a fine line between post-feminist and feminist understandings of rape and gendered violence, while reinforcing harmful racial tropes rooted in ‘white feminism’. In 2020, Netflix brought Kimmy back for her ‘biggest adventure yet’ in Kimmy vs the Reverend, but, this time, the viewer had the power, as the tagline read, to ‘decide what happens’, with Netflix’s interactive feature. The article argues that Netflix’s interactivity feature is employed in potentially transformative ways, providing a call-to-action to fans and implicating the audience as both spectators and witnesses to injustices of systemic violence against women. However, the 2020 film's investment in, and deployment of white feminist politics mirrors a broader media erasure of the experiences of racialised women, while closing down the interactive potential of identification across difference.
Aris Mousoutzanis
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 71-73; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020980535a

Gry C Rustad, Anders Olof Larsson
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 7-29; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020974347

Abstract:
This article introduces quantitative reception aesthetics as a method and demonstrates how big data derived from social media services and textual analysis can be employed to uncover hitherto hidden processes of media spectatorship. It demonstrates how mixing quantitative and qualitative methods allows us to understand textual engagement and how media spectatorship evolves over time. Taking the Norwegian web series, Skam (2015–2017), as its case study, the article demonstrates how (web)television engagement on Instagram is linked to aesthetics and narrative events and how textual engagement is more universal than perhaps post-structuralist reception studies of media reception might have us believe.
Nahuel Ribke
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 16, pp 47-61; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020980139

Abstract:
Produced and released by Netflix in March 2018, The Mechanism (2018–), a web series, fictionalised the Lava Jato operation, a series of criminal investigations about corruption in the Brazilian political system that led to the imprisonment of leading Brazilian politicians and businessmen. Analysing the series along with the media coverage in the Brazilian mainstream online and printed press, this article examines the complex and troublesome relationship between an ongoing criminal investigation with ramifications for the political system and its fictionalisation on a worldwide internet television platform.
Janet McCabe, Stephen Lacey, Elke Weissmann
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 15, pp 331-335; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020964987

Lothar Mikos
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 15, pp 373-392; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020948210

Abstract:
Berlin has had a long, often complex history as a location site and centre for production dating to the end of the 19th century. By the 2010s however, the German city had once more become a central location and production site for international and national television, in part because of changing media policy and shifts in the global media industry, as well as related to the mediated imagination of the city. The article charts those changes in local production cultures related to technology, politics and economics but also to the aesthetic and narrative representation of the city which affected audiences and producers. The central argument is that local production cultures are not homogeneous, but ambivalent and sometimes contradictory.
Trisha Dunleavy
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 15, pp 336-356; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020953755

Abstract:
Rai/HBO co-production L’Amica Geniale/ My Brilliant Friend (2018–) provides an illuminating example of changing strategies for transnational drama co-production in television’s burgeoning ‘multiplatform’ era. Foregrounding institutional over textual analysis, the article places My Brilliant Friend ( MBF) within the industrial, creative and cultural contexts that have facilitated it. Important to these contexts is that transnational co-productions between non-US broadcasters and US-based premium networks are not only increasing but also exhibiting a new degree of cultural diversity. The article examines MBF’s origination as a literary adaptation, its genesis as a ‘cross-platform’ co-production, and its exemplification of changing drama commissioning strategies for Rai and HBO.
Ayşegül Kesirli Unur
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 15, pp 357-372; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020956974

Abstract:
This article intends to understand the significance of depicting the Ottoman past in Turkish TV dramas by focusing on Filinta [Flintlock] (2014–2016) , a hybrid of historical drama and police procedural that is set in the second half of the 19th century in the Ottoman Empire. On the one hand, the article examines the influence of the Ottoman heritage in localising the police procedural genre in Filinta by exploring various kinds of local, cultural and historical connections. On the other hand, it investigates the appeal of using the Ottoman markers in increasing the popularity of the series in the global television market.
Jana Jedličková, Jakub Korda,
Critical Studies in Television: The International Journal of Television Studies, Volume 15, pp 409-423; https://doi.org/10.1177/1749602020948185

Abstract:
In 2017 the first television studies university programme in the Czech Republic was officially opened at Palacký University in Olomouc. However, television has been a focus of Czech academics and television and film reviewers and practitioners for a long time. This review aims to introduce various forms of academic thinking about Czech and Czechoslovak television, published both in Czech and English. It distinguishes four academic and one insider position, based on institutional and disciplinary criteria. Additionally, the article points towards possible issues with trying to reflect on and teach television in a small, post-socialist East-Central European country where there is a limited number of original scholarly books, theoretical initiatives and translations of important texts from the field of TV studies. At the same time, the small size of the TV market, language barriers and the post-socialist heritage inform the local academic debate with specific research questions that have the potential of opening new perspectives on issues such as ideology, political power, mediated memory and globalisation.
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