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Results in Journal Annals of Clinical Hypertension: 34

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Ding Feng-Feng, Hu Ji-Hong, Wang Zeng-Wu, Wang Xin, Yan Chun-Juan, Ma Ming-Yan, Chen Xue-Lian
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 6, pp 009-011; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001029

Abstract:
Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death worldwide [1].
Mangi Manzoor H, Stock Ulrich, Ali Kanval, Galiatsou Eftychia, Jeyakumar Visuvanathan, Doce Ana Hurtado, Harris Paul, Bhudia Sunil K
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 6, pp 001-008; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001028

Abstract:
Background: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia/thrombosis (HIT/T) is characterized by a fall in platelet count 5-10days after starting heparin therapy and is diagnosed with specific 4-T clinical features and laboratory tests. This complication is relatively common in Cardiothoracic surgery patients. Objective: To evaluate the positive and negative predictive value of various HIT laboratory tests and assess any correlation between HIT, the underlying diagnosis, underlying procedure, and mechanical cardiac devices. Patients and methods: The patient’s medical records were correlated with two laboratories HIT diagnostic tests, the pan-specific screening test with IgG, IgA, and IgM antibodies, followed by HIT specific IgG ELISA. Results: Total n = 80 patients were assessed, 48% (n = 38) were HIT screen pan-specific negative and 50% (n = 40) were HIT pan-specific positive and 2 cases were inconclusive. 17% (n = 14) were both pan-specific and specific HIT IgG ELISA positive. There were 5 atypical cases. One patient had Eosinophilic myocarditis and was HIT ELISA IgG neg. Argatroban was given on clinical grounds with successful recovery. One patient with Sarcoidosis had an aggressive course and received IV Immunoglobulin (IVIG) but succumbed secondary to liver failure. One patient progressed to gut ischemia and had surgical intervention but succumbed. Two patients with mechanical heart valves were on Argatroban but relapsed and responded to IVIG therapy. Conclusion: Our study indicates that 9/16 (> 50%) HIT-positive patients had valve replacement or cardiac devices suggesting that like knee arthroplasty there is a high incidence of HIT in patients with mechanical heart valves and cardiac devices and this warrants further prospective study.
, Irawati Dewi, Hamid Akhir Yani S
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 5, pp 008-011; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001027

Abstract:
Objective: This study discusses strategies to overcome hypertension patient compliance to manage self-care. The purpose of the study is to provide a summary of the importance of attention to managing hypertension. Method: a review of literature relevant to hypertension, policies, and management, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological, through cross-programs or sectors. Result: This study found that the ministry of health had compiled various policies to reduce the prevalence of hypertension, including technical guidelines for its implementation, but the strategy has not yet fully reached the minimum service standard, which is because it has not fully involved the relevant cross sectors. Conclusion: Improve the coordination system by “Joint Decree” between the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Villages, PDT and Transmigration, the Ministry of Social Affairs, Indonesian National Army, police, and NGOs to carry out activities simultaneously to the community.
McGlone Samantha, Samantha McGlone, Edward Castillo, Ronald Dunlay,
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 5, pp 003-007; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001026

Abstract:
Background: Meclizine is a commonly prescribed medication for patients discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) with a diagnosis of peripheral vertigo, however it is on the Beers list of medications to avoid in elderly patients. Objectives: This study aims to determine the correlation between use of meclizine and return visits to the ED within 1 week in patients > 65 years old. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study conducted at 2 urban tertiary care EDs over 5 years. Inclusion criteria included patients > 65 years who were given meclizine in the ED or discharged with a prescription. Charts were reviewed for diagnosis, prescriptions and return visits within 7 days. Results: There were a total of 1608 patients over 65 years of age who met inclusion criteria, 669 patients identified as receiving meclizine in the ED and 962 who received no meclizine (ED or ED plus home prescription). Of the meclizine patients, 548 (84.8%) were given home prescriptions, of which there were 36 (6.6%) return visits within 7 days. Patients who were given meclizine while in the ED without home prescriptions (121) had 16 return visits (13.2%). Among the non-meclizine group, 102 patients (10.6%) had a return visit within 7 days. Conclusion: There was no increase in return visits in elderly patients discharged from the ED with a prescription for meclizine after a diagnosis of benign dizziness. Meclizine prescriptions at discharge were associated with fewer return visits to the ED within 1 week. Ongoing dizziness was the most common reason for return visits; there were no documented chief complaints of weakness, syncope/falls, or hypotension.
Kaya Ergün Barış,
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 5, pp 001-002; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001025

Abstract:
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are widely used in Oncology practice. Hypertension may develop during cancer treatment and TKIs are well known drugs that are associated with drug related hypertensive toxicity. TKI related hypertensive toxicity is not always the indicator of worse clinical outcomes and it may be the sign of treatment efficacy.
Brown-Martínez Marta, Hernández Zenaida, Valdés Yamile, González Edilberto, Despaign Emelina, Gonzalez Evelio
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 4, pp 001-008; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001021

Luis Alcocer, Humberto Álvarez-López, Gabriela Borrayo-Sánchez, Ernesto Germán Cardona-Muñoz, Adolfo Chávez-Mendoza, Enrique Díaz Y Díaz, José Manuel Enciso-Muñoz, Héctor Galván-Oseguera, Enrique Gómez-Álvarez, Pedro Gutiérrez-Fajardo, et al.
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 3, pp 009-030; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001015

, Lizette Arizmendi-Ocampo, Daniela Salinas Morales, Alejandro Chanona Espinosa, Alicia Contreras Rodríguez, Erick Ramírez Arias, Carlos Riera Kinkel, Guadalupe Castro Martínez, José Antonio Magaña-Serrano
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 3, pp 001-008; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001014

, Martin Rosas-Peralta, Erick Ramírez-Arias, Gladys M Jiménez-Genchi, Martha Alicia Hernández-González, Rafael Barraza-Félix, Lidia Evangelina Betacourt-Hernández, Rocio Camacho-Casillas, Rodolfo Parra-Michel, Héctor David Martínez Chapa, et al.
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 2, pp 038-047; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001010

Samuel Seriki A, Seriki A Samuel, Adebayo O Francis, Odetola O Anthony
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 2, pp 048-058; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001011

, , Janaí Santiago-López, Erick Ramirez Árias, Rosalba García Méndez, Victor Hugo Borja-Aburto, Ana Carolina Sepúlveda-Vildósola, José De Jesús Arriaga-Dávila
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 2, pp 024-030; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001008

Roberto Carlos Burini, Mariana Santoro Nakagaki, Edilaine Michelin, Franz Homero Paganini Burini
Annals of Clinical Hypertension, Volume 2, pp 001-016; https://doi.org/10.29328/journal.ach.1001006

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