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Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 39-42; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1938482

Abstract:
This essay attempts to rectify the silence about the willful expropriation, by British and Israeli forces, of private Palestinian financial assets. Placing at its core the stories of ordinary Palestinians, it explores how they were robbed of their bank accounts, bonds, stocks, pensions, salaries, and safety deposit boxes during the creation and termination of the Palestine Mandate (in both 1917 and 1948). The essay argues that the basic financial structure of colonization, which deprives the colonized of the protection of sovereign banking institutions, facilitated these thefts. It also argues that the supposedly neutral rules of finance acted as a fig leaf to such dispossessions. Based on archival research and oral histories, it presents a new social history of finance that centers the experiences and subjectivities of non-elite Palestinians who strove to defend themselves and assert their rights, individually and collectively, during pivotal moments of violent upheaval and rupture.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 52-55; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1941682

Abstract:
For many Palestinians, the colonial denial of Palestinian self-determination in an independent nation-state has rendered futile the very notion of a future. But it is imperative to challenge the colonial logics that produce the native’s future as always already failed, unachievable, or impossible. This essay examines snippets of the life of Arab Jerusalem between the two major ruptures of 1948 and 1967 to deconstruct colonial and nationalist epistemologies of time and to challenge the persistently violent present and its domination of Palestinian pasts and futures. Using as its lens the memories and attachments of Jerusalemites who lived, worked, and struggled in the city, the essay examines the ways in which they thought of, imagined, produced, fulfilled, or were deprived of a future—in other words, how Jerusalemites shaped futurity. Such a nonlinear unfolding of time challenges dominant perceptions of the Nakba as constituting a clean break between past and present.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 47-51; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1938483

Abstract:
This essay briefly examines a pattern of little-known local and general strikes staged by the Palestinian public during 1938, amid the Palestinian uprising known as the Great Revolt. While largely overshadowed by the armed struggle then underway, these nonviolent strikes illustrate the widespread character of Indigenous resistance to British colonial rule and of support for the rebellion. Palestine has often been described as a laboratory for repression; yet when we attend to Palestinian social history, we also see that it has been a laboratory of freedom struggle, popular resilience, and recurrent waves of activism and tactical experimentation.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 37-38; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1941683

Abstract:
Journal of Palestine Studies coeditor Sherene Seikaly introduces a cluster of essays by Sreemati Mitter, Alex Winder, Charles W. Anderson, and Haneen Naamneh that examines Palestinian “history from below.” The focus of these essays is on the everyday losses endured and the community-based forms of resistance enacted by ordinary Palestinians. Seikaly explains how, through the struggle against financial dispossession, the journey into insurgent law, broad-based collective civil disobedience, and Arab futurity in Jerusalem, these four essays make space for new understandings in the way we narrate Palestine, its history, and its people.
, Richard Falk
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 56-68; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1947108

Abstract:
The recent ruling of the International Criminal Court (ICC) affirming territorial jurisdiction over the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and the Gaza Strip may at first appear to be a mere procedural decision outlining the court’s authority to investigate Israeli criminality. Upon closer scrutiny, however, it is clearly much more: an indirect, yet far-reaching vindication of Palestinian resistance and struggle in the ongoing “legitimacy war” with Israel. These legal proceedings have momentous potential implications for broader accountability efforts, which could be significant over time, even if attempts to prosecute Israeli perpetrators are ultimately frustrated. This legal event already sheds light on both the limitations of the court and the legal and geopolitical challenges it faces in cases where suspected perpetrators wield significant influence in international political arenas. As of now, the ICC has gained credibility precisely because it has the institutional courage to take on the architects of Israeli criminality.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 43-46; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1941680

Abstract:
This essay examines the practices and institutions of “rebel justice” that emerged during two of the most effective and sustained anti-colonial uprisings of the twentieth century, the Great Revolt and the First Intifada. It addresses these uprisings “from below” to illuminate their social foundations and the kinds of futures they imagined. For Palestinians, communal justice (sulh, ‘urf, and the like) have been prevalent forms of dispute resolution and justice-seeking. Rather than being written in a criminal code, the foundation of justice was based on shared notions of honor, redemption, and a social order that balanced hierarchical impulses with egalitarian ones. The essay also addresses Palestine’s place within abolitionist discussions currently under way in the United States, building upon the notable connections and parallels between the two geographies, from joint trainings undertaken by U.S. and Israeli forces to recent manifestations and longer traditions of Black-Palestinian solidarity.
Rashid I. Khalidi
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 5-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1933101

Abstract:
The Journal of Palestine Studies is celebrating fifty years of uninterrupted publication as the journal of record on Palestinian affairs since its founding in 1971. Historian, book author, and Columbia University’s Edward Said Chair of Middle East Studies, Rashid Khalidi, has been at the helm as editor for almost two decades. In this article, he reflects on the Journal’s role in knowledge production on Palestine from a number of vantage points: the situation that obtained at the Journal’s founding when Palestinians simply did not have “permission to narrate” their own story in the Western public sphere; the evolution of the academic universe in the United States and its eventual embrace of disciplines, such as race, gender, Indigenous, and Palestine studies, once considered marginal or fringe; and the concomitant and virulent Zionist campaign to tar speech critical of Israel and the Zionist project with the brush of anti-Semitism, whether in the media, politics, or academia.
Compiled By Norbert Scholz
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 77-94; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1955556

Abstract:
This section lists articles and reviews of books relevant to Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Entries are classified under the following headings: Palestine in Global and Comparative Perspectives; Palestine and the Palestinians; Literature and the Arts; Middle East and the Arab World; Israel and Zionism; and Recent Theses and Dissertations.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 18-36; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1926871

Abstract:
This article analyzes the political narratives and critiques of young Palestinian refugees who have grown up in the bleak post-Oslo period. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews conducted with refugee youth in Jordan and the West Bank between 2009 and 2014, I show that this generation of refugees endorses a collective Palestinian identity and peoplehood with claims to the (home)land while also narrating their identities and relations to land, nation, state, and rights as complex, multifaceted, and fractured. Their political imaginaries do not limit the political and epistemic project of decolonizing Palestine to the classic paradigm of a territorialized nation-state as enshrined in the Oslo two-state agenda. Rather, they point to a creative and radical, post-nation-statist, translocal politics for Palestine.
Omar Barghouti
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 108-125; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1906067

Abstract:
Despite its military, diplomatic, and economic power, Israel’s regime of military occupation, settler colonialism, and apartheid still views the nonviolent, Palestinian-led global Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) movement as a “strategic threat” to its system of injustice, waging a protracted war against the movement accordingly. This essay aims to contextualize Israel’s war on BDS by examining the movement’s origins, principles, impact, and theory of change. It analyzes the most critical challenges BDS is facing and its most promising strengths, especially its balancing of ethical principles with strategic effectiveness and its intersectional approach to the struggle for Palestinian freedom, justice, and equality.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 43-66; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1909376

Abstract:
This article explores the resurgence of Indigenous/Palestine solidarity during the Wet’suwet’en land sovereignty struggle in Canada that took place around the same time Donald Trump’s Middle East “peace plan” was released in early 2020. Historicizing this resurgence within a longer period of anti-colonial resistance, the article attends to the distinct historical, political-economic, and juridical formations that undergird settler colonialism in Canada and Israel/Palestine. It contends with the theoretical limits of the settler-colonial framework, pushing back against narratives of settler success, and shows how anti-colonial resistance accelerated economic crises that led both settler states to enter into “negotiations” with the colonized (reconciliation in one case, and peace talks in the other) as a strategy to maintain capitalist settler control over stolen lands. The analysis also sheds light on a praxis of solidarity that has implications for movement building and joint struggle.
Louise Cainkar
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 4-21; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1899513

Abstract:
Taking the small number of ethnographic studies of Palestinian communities in North America as its problematic, this article situates that predicament in the larger context of decades of academic silencing of Arab American and SWANA (Southwest Asia and North Africa) studies, efforts that represent but one component of a larger political project to quash pro-Palestinian activism. Abetted by the absence of a racial category, scholars continue to face substantial hurdles at the institutional level, inhibiting the robust growth of the field and boding poorly for an expansion in community studies. Yet recent scholarship on Palestinians in North America—exemplified by the articles included in this special issue that center the complexities of identities; activism; and Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) solidarities—evidences real changes on the ground for Palestinian activism. Those changes, and continued advocacy for institutional change, are necessary to invigorate community studies, a critically important method of scholar-activist praxis because of their power to enhance a community’s access to resources, well-being, organizing capacities, and local-level power and solidarity building.
Salim Tamari
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 133-137; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1886464

Abstract:
In this essay, emeritus sociology professor Salim Tamari surveys the study of Ottoman Palestine within the pages of JPS, identifying two groundbreaking articles: Beshara Doumani’s “Rediscovering Ottoman Palestine: Writing Palestinians into History” (1992) and Louis Fishman’s “The 1911 Haram al-Sharif Incident: Palestinian Notables versus the Ottoman Administration” (2005). Tamari argues that the two contributions have, in different ways, fundamentally shifted our understanding of a local Palestinian identity within the broader Ottoman-era region of Bilad al-Sham.
Sreemati Mitter
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 138-143; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1886468

Abstract:
In addition to selecting a “greatest hit” and a “hidden gem,” here, Sreemati Mitter provides readers with a broad overview of Journal of Palestine Studies (JPS) content on the topic of capitalism in Palestine. Mitter singles out Alexander Schölch’s classic, “The Economic Development of Palestine, 1856–1882” (1981) as a greatest hit and Peter Lagerquist’s haunting “Vacation from History: Ethnic Cleansing as the Club Med Experience” (2006) as a hidden gem. Read together, she argues, these two pieces help elucidate how powerful forces of global market capitalism converged on Palestine’s storied Mediterranean coast to shape its economy in the modern period.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 92-107; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1889875

Abstract:
This article contributes to Palestinian intellectual history by discussing the lives and writings of three diaspora intellectuals during the transitional period of the 1950s: Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, Abdul-Latif Tibawi, and Nicola Ziadeh. I argue that they fused a conservative acceptance of state authority and avoidance of radical politics with a liberal understanding of nationalism and scholarship, including freedom, secularism, and objectivity. Without a Palestinian nation-state, their participation in the imagined futures of Pan-Arabism and decolonization meant avoiding radical leftist political movements. Instead, they advanced literature and history, surviving in the diaspora as liberals during Pan-Arabism’s transition from a revolutionary goal to a state ideology.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 22-42; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1914938

Abstract:
This article explores the transnational histories that have conditioned Palestinian youth organizing in the United States from the 1950s to the present day. It examines the organizational vehicles of earlier generations of activists such as the Organization of Arab Students (OAS) and the General Union of Palestinian Students (GUPS) to trace the formation of the U.S. chapter of the transnational Palestinian Youth Movement (PYM). It argues that in the Oslo and post-Oslo eras, which severed the Palestinian diaspora from the national body politic and the rich Palestinian organizational histories of the pre-1993 period, the lessons of their forerunners are instructive for PYM’s new generation of organizers. The article posits that transnational connections have profound implications for localized U.S. political organizing and that contemporary Palestinian youth organizing is part of a historical continuum. Drawing on oral history and scholar-­activist ethnographic methods, the article situates contemporary youth organizing in its transnational and historical contexts.
Nadine Naber
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 144-146; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1886470

Abstract:
This final essay in the “greatest hits” and “hidden gems” series tackles the topic of activism. Noting the richness and diversity of JPS’s contributions in this regard, Nadine Naber hones in on the necessity for hope and for grassroots mobilization at this Palestinian juncture. She exhorts readers to revisit Jonathan Kuttab’s 1988 essay, “The Children’s Revolt,” and Salim Tamari’s article, “The Palestinian Movement in Transition: Historical Reversals and the Uprising,” which appeared in 1991, for both inspiration and edification. Doing so, she argues, “allows readers to reimagine hope as a political ideology and as a set of practices that foster the possibilities for change and decolonization for years to come.”
Gadi Algazi
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 127-132; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1886466

Abstract:
Tasked with selecting two documents specifically related to Israel and the Israeli settler-colonial enterprise from the fifty-year JPS archive, author Gadi Algazi settles on “History’s Verdict: The Cherokee Case” (1995) by Norman Finkelstein and “The Palestinians Seen through the Israeli Cultural Paradigm” (1987) coauthored by Aziz Haidar and Elia Zreik. While the former points to the historical affinities between the Zionist colonization of Palestine and the settlement of North America (including early Zionists’ unabashed identification with the “white” colonizers of the continent), the latter elucidates Israel’s “culturalist account” of Palestinians, which views the main problem with Palestinians in Israel as their “culture,” and not the colonization, repression, and exclusion they experienced historically and continue to endure.
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 67-91; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2021.1899516

Abstract:
This article analyzes transformations in Palestinian secularism, specifically in Chicago, Illinois, in response to the weakening of the Palestine Liberation Organization and the emergence of Islamic reformist structures since the late 1980s. Up until then, secular community organizations that aligned with the secular-oriented Palestinian political factions constituted the ideological center of this community. Beginning in the late 1980s, however, a discernible religious shift began to take place. The analysis draws from extensive fieldwork (2010–15) to show how secularism has not disappeared but rather transmuted into new, often hybrid forms whose lack of institutionalization reflect the attenuation of secularist structures and orientations. The weakening of the secularist milieu leaves individuals who have become disenchanted with the religious-sectarian shift (at the time of the fieldwork) with few alternatives for social connection, solidarity, and action. They forge their own idiosyncratic paths as a result.
Kaoukab Chebaro
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 126-127; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865750

Abstract:
(2021). An Oral History of the Palestinian Nakba. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 126-127.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 106-111; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842011

Abstract:
Examining the Journal’s fifty-year trajectory documenting the political economy of Palestine and of the Palestinians (not one and the same), author Leila Farsakh highlights contributions by a rich mix of economists, anthropologists, and other scholars: from Yusif and Rosemary Sayigh, Sara Roy, George Abed, Raja Khalidi, and Linda Tabar to Darryl Li, Judith Gabriel, Nicholas Pelham, Sobhi Samour, Omar Jabari Salamanca, and Helga Tawil-Souri (to name only some). Taken together, Farsakh argues, their writings expose “the diversity of Palestinian economic realities,” and highlight the continuing relevance of the settler-colonial paradigm as “the most useful analytic for understanding the Palestinian economic predicament.” Far from being a neutral technocratic process, economic development is “embedded in power structures that need to be dissected and understood at both macro and micro levels.”
Yousef Munayyer
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 118-123; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1850137

Abstract:
In this essay, Yousef Munayyer reflects on the politics of contentiousness through the lens of dissent and repression. He singles out Naseer Aruri’s “Resistance and Repression: Political Prisoners in Israeli Occupied Territories” (1979) as a JPS “hidden gem” and Gene Sharp’s “Intifadah and Nonviolent Struggle” (1989) as a “greatest hit.” Aruri’s piece, which has not garnered as much visibility as Sharp’s, pinpoints the ways in which political imprisonment, torture, and the weaponization of the law, as well as extraterritorial jurisdiction, are wielded by Israel as instruments of political repression. The “greatest hit,” by the late contemporary theorist of nonviolence Gene Sharp examines the Palestinian national movement’s resistance strategy eighteen months into the First Intifada.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 124-125; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1860647

Abstract:
(2021). Partitioning Palestine: British Policymaking at the End of Empire , by Penny Sinanoglou. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2019. 256 pages. $40.00 cloth, e-book available. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 124-125.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 131-133; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865756

Abstract:
(2021). Traces of Racial Exception: Racializing Israeli Settler Colonialism. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 131-133.
Maia Tabet
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 99-100; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1859840

Abstract:
(2021). JPS “Hidden Gems” and “Greatest Hits”: Fifty Years of Narrating Palestine. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 99-100.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 130-131; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865755

Abstract:
(2021). Palestinian Refugees after 1948: The Failure of International Diplomacy. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 130-131.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 112-117; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842007

Abstract:
This essay examines JPS’s fifty-year archive of law-related content from the prism of its contribution to the author’s own thinking (and writing) about the relationship between law and politics in the context of the Palestinian question. Noura Erakat identifies as a “greatest hit” Hanna Dib Nakkara’s “Israeli Land Seizure under Various Defense and Emergency Regulations” (1985) for its meticulous documentation of the Israeli legal regime established to confiscate Palestinian lands. Erakat’s “hidden gem” is “Juridical Characteristics of Palestinian Resistance: An Appraisal in Law,” coauthored by W. T. Jr. and S. V. Mallison. Published in 1973, the article argues for the treatment of captured fedayeen as prisoners of war four years prior to the amendment of the Geneva Convention recognizing national liberation struggles as international conflicts.
Elizabeth M. Holt
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 3-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1855933

Abstract:
For the last decade of his life, the Palestinian intellectual, author, and editor Ghassan Kanafani (d. 1972) was deeply immersed in theorizing, lecturing, and publishing on Palestinian resistance literature from Beirut. A refugee of the 1948 war, Kanafani presented his theory of resistance literature and the notion of “cultural siege” at the March 1967 Beirut conference of the Soviet-funded Afro-Asian Writers Association (AAWA). Articulated in resistance to Zionist propaganda literature and in solidarity with Marxist-Leninist revolutionary struggles in the Third World, Kanafani was inspired by Maxim Gorky, William Faulkner, and Mao Zedong alike. In books, essays, and lectures, Kanafani argued that Zionist propaganda literature served as a “weapon” in the war against Palestine, returning repeatedly to Arthur Koestler’s 1946 Thieves in the Night. Better known for his critique of Stalinism in Darkness at Noon (1940), Koestler was also actively involved in waging cultural Cold War, writing the United States Central Intelligence Agency’s (CIA) Congress for Cultural Freedom 1950 manifesto and helping the organization infiltrate Afro-Asian writing in the wake of Bandung. Kanafani’s 1960s theory of resistance literature thus responded at once to the psychological dislocation of Zionist propaganda fiction and the cultural infiltration of Arabic literature in the Cold War.
Dale Hudson
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 51-76; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1850136

Abstract:
Available on publicly accessible websites, interactive documentaries are typically free to use, allowing audiences to navigate through amounts of information too large for standard film or television documentaries. Media literacy, however, is needed to understand the ways that interactive documentaries reveal or conceal their power to narrate. Examining ARTE France’s Gaza Sderot (2008–9), Zochrot’s iNakba (2014), and Dorit Naaman’s Jerusalem, We Are Here (2016), this article discusses documentaries that prompt audiences to reflect upon asymmetries in the power to forget history and the responsibility to remember it by mapping Palestinian geographies that have been rendered invisible. Since media ecologies are increasingly militarized, particularly in Palestine/Israel, interactive documentaries like iNakba and Jerusalem, We Are Here can disrupt Israeli state branding as technologically innovative while minimizing risk of surveillance by avoiding the use of location-aware technologies that transform interaction into tracking.
Maggie Nye Smith
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 134-139; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865761

Abstract:
Published each issue, this section strives to capture the tenor and content of popular conversations related to the Palestinians and the Arab-Israeli conflict, which are held on dynamic platforms unbound by traditional media. Therefore, items presented in this section are from a variety of sources and have been selected because they either have gone viral or represent a significant cultural moment or trend.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 19-50; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1861906

Abstract:
In the early 1960s, Israeli diplomats based in Paris noted that student life there had become political in new ways that threatened to undermine Israel’s image and standing in the public mind. In an effort to understand the growing international student body and its nine thousand well-integrated Arab students, the embassy asked Israeli students to spy on their colleagues and submit detailed reports about their political associations, thoughts, opinions, connections, whereabouts, and much else. Using the reports and other auxiliary material that the Israeli diplomats collected, this article examines the formation process of a unique, student-led intellectual and political ecosystem. Specifically, it shows how, in tandem with the rise of the New Arab Left and other transnational student collaborations, the Palestinian question grew from a marginal and marginalized issue to a major cause that was deeply entwined with other contemporaneous causes of universal resonance, such as those of South Africa, Rhodesia, and Algeria.
, Sherene Seikaly
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 1-2; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865757

Abstract:
(2021). From the Editors. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 1-2.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 128-129; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1865752

Abstract:
(2021). Makers of Worlds, Readers of Signs: Israeli and Palestinian Literature of the Global Contemporary. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 128-129.
Published: 2 January 2021
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 101-105; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842018

Abstract:
Perusing JPS’s fifty years of documenting Palestinian history, this essay reminds us that history is both “what happened” as well as “the narration of what happened.” Anchoring his selection in that perspective, Alex Winder identifies Charles Anderson’s “State Formation from Below and the Great Revolt in Palestine” (2017) as a JPS “hidden gem,” and Tarif Khalidi’s “Palestinian Historiography: 1900–1948” (1981) as a “greatest hit.” Relying on primary sources by participants in the rebellion and highlighting the history of the revolt, Anderson shifts the focus of traditional accounts of the revolt from the mostly ineffective role of Palestinian notables and elites to the successes of the rebels. In a similar vein, Khalidi’s article paints a picture of a rich and vibrant Palestinian intellectual life in the first half of the twentieth century that reverses the conventional view of the colonized as reactive and of the colonizer as the primary agent of history.
Norbert Scholz
Published: 30 December 2020
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 140-160; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842006

Abstract:
(2021). Bibliography of Periodical Literature 16 MAY–15 AUGUST 2020. Journal of Palestine Studies: Vol. 50, No. 1, pp. 140-160.
Published: 17 December 2020
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 77-90; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842002

Abstract:
In contemporary conversations around Israel/Palestine, the Gaza Strip is construed as a state of exception, rendering the territory either hypervisible or entirely invisible. Through the prism of the Covid-19 pandemic and Israel’s possible de jure annexation of portions of the West Bank, this piece argues that rather than being exceptional, the Gaza Strip represents the very embodiment of Israeli settler colonialism in Palestine. Its isolation and de-development constitute the endpoint of Israel’s policies of land theft and Palestinian dispossession. This endpoint, referred to as Gazafication, entails the confinement of Palestinians to urban enclaves entirely surrounded by Israel or Israeli-controlled territory. The Trump plan, otherwise known as the “deal of the century,” along with the ­Covid-19 crisis, have inadvertently exposed the reality of Gaza as an enclave of the one-state paradigm.
Published: 17 December 2020
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 50, pp 91-98; https://doi.org/10.1080/0377919x.2020.1842017

Abstract:
Ariella Aïsha Azoulay’s new book, Potential History: Unlearning Imperialism, offers a rethinking of violence and modernity that presents collaborative, reparative forms of world building as the only viable means of resisting and overcoming the ravages of imperialism. The book is at once a reckoning with empire, a semiautobiographical theorization of complicity, and a magnificent analytic exposé of imperial technologies of knowing, including photography, art, archives and museums, history, sovereignty, and human rights.
Weeam Hammoudeh, Samah Jabr, Maria Helbich, Cindy Sousa
Journal of Palestine Studies, Volume 49, pp 77-90; https://doi.org/10.1525/jps.2020.49.4.77

Abstract:
The Covid-19 pandemic has laid bare the devastating and disproportionate effects of structures of violence that produce vulnerability in communities of color globally, including with respect to mental health-care provision. While coping and resilience are dominant mainstream frameworks to understand mental health in crisis—both in Palestine and elsewhere—the three contributors to this roundtable were asked to offer a rejoinder to that approach. They reflect on the pandemic as an opportunity to revisit how we understand and advocate for critical approaches to mental health in Palestine in the midst of prolonged crisis.
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