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Results in Journal Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials: 4,241

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Ali Lesani, Iman Ramazani Sarbandi, Hengameh Mousavi, Somaieh Kazemnejad,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35007

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Cai‐Sheng Liu, Bo‐Wen Feng, , Yu‐Mei Liu, Liang Chen, Yan‐Ling Chen, Zhi‐Ye Yao, Min‐Qiao Jian
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35000

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Reem S. Al‐Hejailan, Razan H. Bakheet, Mashael M. Al‐Saud, Mansour B. Al‐Jufan, Hussain M. Al‐Hindas, Somaya M. Al‐Qattan, Muhanna K. Al‐Muhanna, Ranjit S. Parhar, Walter Conca, Jan Hansmann, et al.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Volume 110; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35013

Abstract:
The cover image is based on the Research Article Toward allogenizing a xenograft: Xenogeneic cardiac scaffolds recellularized with human-induced pluripotent stem cells do not activate human naïve neutrophils by Reem S. Al-Hejailan et al., https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34948.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Volume 110, pp 501-506; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34871

Diana Julaidy Patty, Ari Dwi Nugraheni, ,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35009

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Elena Markova, Lea Taneska, Monika Kostovska, Dushko Shalabalija, Ljubica Mihailova, Marija Glavas Dodov, Petre Makreski, Nikola Geskovski, Marija Petrushevska, Arben N. Taravari, et al.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35006

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, Janis Lungevics, Jana Vecstaudza, Liga Stipniece, Janis Locs
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35005

Abstract:
Calcium phosphates (CaP) are extensively studied as additives to dental care products for tooth enamel protection against caries. However, it is not clear yet whether substituted CaP could provide better enamel protection. In this study we produced, characterized and tested in vitro substituted and co-substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHAp) with Sr2+ and F ions. X-ray powder diffractometry, Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller were used to characterize synthesized powders and also cytotoxicity was evaluated. pH = f(t) test was performed to estimate, weather synthesized CDHAp suspensions are able to increase pH of experimental media after acid addition. Synthesis products were incorporated into paste to perform in vitro remineralization on the bovine enamel. In addition to mentioned instrumental methods, profilometry was used for evaluation of remineralised enamel samples. The obtained results confirmed formation of CDHAp substituted with 1.5–1.6 wt% of fluoride and 7.4–7.8 wt% of strontium. pH = f(t) experiment pointed out that pH increased by approximately 0.3 within 10 min after acid addition for all CDHAp suspensions. A new layer of the corresponding CDHAp was formed on the enamel. Its thickness increased by 0.8 ± 0.1 μm per day and reached up to 5.8 μm after 7 days. Additionally, octa calcium phosphates were detected on the surface of control samples. In conclusion, we can assume that CDHAp substituted with Sr2+ and/or F could be used as an effective additive to dental care products promoting formation of protecting layer on the enamel, but there was no significant difference among sample groups.
, Małgorzata Siatkowska, Kamila Białkowska, Marcin Rosowski, Piotr Komorowski, Bogdan Walkowiak
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35002

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, Lucas Siqueira Pinheiro, Júlia Silveira Nunes, Roberta De Almeida Mendes, Cláudia Daniela Schuster, Renata Grazziotin Soares, Patrícia Maria Poli Kopper, José Antônio Poli de Figueiredo,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35004

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Colleen Fisher, Hui Shao,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35003

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, Lance Erik Westerlund, Vedran Lovric, William Walsh
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34971

Abstract:
The ability of particulate bioactive glass to function as an effective bone graft material is directly related to its in vivo dissolution, ion release, and interparticle spacing (area associated with bone in-growth). A spherical shape represents an optimal geometry to control bioactive glass bone formation properties. Spherical particles were fabricated from 45S5 bioactive glass with unimodal (90–180, 180–355, and 355–500 μm) and bimodal size ranges (180–355/355–500 and 90–180/355–500 μm). Particles were formed into bone graft putties and compared to a commercially available product composed of irregular 45S5 bioactive glass particles (32–710 μm). Scanning electron microscopy characterization of spherical particles showed a relatively uniform sphere shape and smooth surfaces. Irregular particles were characterized by random shapes with flat surfaces and sharp edges. X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction indicated that the spheroidization process maintained the properties of 45S5 bioactive glass. Cross-sectional micro-computed tomography imaging of the putty samples demonstrated that smaller spheres and irregular particles resulted denser packing patterns compared to the larger spheres. Isolated particles were immersed in simulated body fluid for 14 days to measure silicon ion release and bioactivity. Inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy showed faster ion release from smaller particles due to increased surface area. Bioactivity characterization of 14-day simulated body fluid exposed particle surfaces showed the presence of a hydroxycarbanoapatite mineral layer (characteristic of 45S5 bioactive glass) on all bioactive glass particles. Results demonstrated that spherical particles maintained the properties of the starting 45S5 bioactive glass, and that particle shape and size directly affected short-term glass dissolution, ion release, and interparticle spacing.
Karuppuswamy Balasubramaniyan, Krishnamoorthy Bhoobalan, Dhasarathi Jayaraman, Shanmugam Sounderraj, K Rajendran Muthuukumar,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.35001

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Yoshitaka Suematsu, Hisato Nagano, Tomoharu Kiyosawa, Shinji Takeoka,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34995

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Danielle Diniz Vilela, Allisson Benatti Justino, Douglas Carvalho Caixeta, Adriele Vieira de Souza, Renata Roland Teixeira, Rodrigo Rodrigues Franco, André Lopes Saraiva, Belchiolina Beatriz Fonseca, Noelio Oliveira Dantas, , et al.
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34988

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, , , Kawany Munique Boriolo Shimomura, Fabio Roberto Passador, Lidiane Cristina Costa, Luiz Antonio Pessan
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34997

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Rebu Sundar, , Suresh Babu, Harikrishna Varma, Annie John, Annie Abraham
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34989

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Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Volume 110, pp 259-264; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34870

, Aaqil Rifai, Rumbidzai Zizhou, Chaitali Dekiwadia, , Sabu John, Kate Fox,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34987

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Jiaxi Liu, Xiang Zhou, , Anping Wang, Wei Zhu, Meijia Xu, Shuxian Zhuang
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34996

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Limei Li, Jidong Li, Qin Zou, Yi Zuo, Lili Lin, Bin Cai, Yubao Li
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34991

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Andrew Baldwin, Maximilian Hartl, Mathaeus Tschaikowsky, Bizan N. Balzer,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34990

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, , Gunnar Dahlén, , Lena Larsson
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34978

Abstract:
The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface cleanness and cytocompatibility following mechanical instrumentation of biofilm-contaminated titanium surfaces. Titanium discs (non-modified [Ti(s)] and shot-blasted surfaces [Ti(r)]) contaminated with Streptococcus gordonii were instrumented using four different techniques: (i) gauze soaked in saline (GS), (ii) ultra-sonic device (US), (iii) rotating nickel-titanium brush (TiB), or (iv) air-polishing device (AP). Non-contaminated, untreated titanium disks were used as controls (C). Residual deposits and cytocompatibility for osteoblast-like cells were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. While the number of residual bacteria on Ti(s) discs was close to 0 in all treatment groups, significantly higher mean numbers of residual bacteria were observed on Ti(r) discs for GS (152.7 ± 75.7) and TiB (33.5 ± 22.2) than for US (0) and AP (0). Instrumentation with US resulted in deposition of foreign material (mean area% of foreign material: 3.0 ± 3.6% and 10.8 ± 9.6% for Ti(s) and Ti(r) discs, respectively). AP was the most effective decontamination procedure in reducing bacteria without depositing residual foreign material on Ti(r) discs. TiB and AP were superior methods in restoring cytocompatibility, although no method of mechanical decontamination resulted in pristine levels of cytocompatibility.
Zahra Ayar, , Farhad Shokraneh, Narges Saderi,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34993

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Shannon L. Rowell, Christopher R. Reyes, Robert H. Hopper Jr, Charles A. Engh Jr, Orhun K. Muratoglu
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34985

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Germano Duarte Porto, Daniela Pacheco Dos Santos Haupenthal, Priscila Soares Souza, Gustavo De Bem Silveira, Renata Tiscoski Nesi, Paulo Emilio Feuser, Jonathann Corrêa Possato, Vanessa Moraes de Andrade, Ricardo Aurino Pinho,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34994

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, Vincent Sarou‐Kanian, Franck Fayon, Sylvie Bonnamy, Nathalie Rochet
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34986

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Somayeh Tofighi Nasab, Nasim Hayati Roodbari, , ,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34983

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Ping Xia,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34979

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, Pulak Mohan Pandey, Muzamil Ahmad Mir, Asit Ranjan Mridha
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34975

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Colton Kostelnik, , Carlos E. Escoto-Diaz, Jesse B. Kooistra, Matthew Stern, Derrick E. Swinton, William Richardson, Wayne Carver, John Eberth
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34969

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, Debarati Ghose, Robert D. Bolskar, Isha Mutreja,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34972

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Meiling Li, Cheng Zheng, Shumang Zhang, Binggang Wu, Kailei Ding, Xueyu Huang, ,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34982

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Neda Eskandari, , Mohammad Mehdi Dehghan, Saeed Farzad‐Mohajeri
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34973

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Tao Zhang, Dekun Zhang, Hongtao Liu, Kai Chen
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34977

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Abdur R. Aleem, Lubna Shahzadi, Muhammad Nasir, Pegah Hajivand, Farah Alvi, Amna Akhtar, Mubashra Zehra, Azra Mehmood,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34981

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, Allison Madeline, Chris Theos, Ricardo Vela, Alex Garon, Sanjitpal Gill,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34980

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Diana M. Abraham, Calvin Herman, , , Roberto L. Flores, Paulo G. Coelho
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34968

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, Julie Vanacker, Emna Ouni, Natalija Tatic, Aiswarya Viswanath, Anne Des Rieux, Marie‐Madeleine Dolmans, ,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34974

Abstract:
To successfully assemble a bio-engineered ovary, we need to create a three-dimensional matrix able to accommodate isolated follicles and cells. The goal of this study was to develop an extracellular matrix hydrogel (oECM) derived from decellularized bovine ovaries able to support, in combination with alginate, human ovarian follicle survival and growth in vitro. Two different hydrogels (oECM1, oECM2) were produced and compared in terms of decellularization efficiency (dsDNA), ECM preservation (collagen and glycosaminoglycan levels), ultrastructure, rigidity, and cytotoxicity. oECM2 showed significantly less dsDNA, greater retention of glycosaminoglycans and better rigidity than oECM1. Isolated human ovarian follicles were then encapsulated in four selected hydrogel combinations: (1) 100% oECM2, (2) 90% oECM2 + 10% alginate, (3) 75% oECM2 + 25% alginate, and (4) 100% alginate. After 1 week of in vitro culture, follicle recovery rate, viability, and growth were analyzed. On day 7 of in vitro culture, follicle recovery rates were 0%, 23%, 65%, 82% in groups 1–4, respectively, rising proportionally with increased alginate content. However, there was no difference in follicle viability or growth between groups 2 and 3 and controls (group 4). In conclusion, since pure alginate cannot be used to graft preantral follicles due to its poor revascularization and degradation after grafting, oECM2 hydrogel combined with alginate may provide a new and promising alternative to graft isolated human follicles in a bio-engineered ovary.
Lívia Bueno Campi, Fernanda Ferrari Esteves Torres, Elisandra Márcia Rodrigues, Juliane Maria Guerreiro‐Tanomaru,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34966

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Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials, Volume 110, pp 1-6; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34869

Lucas Fabricio Bahia Nogueira, Bianca C. Maniglia, , José Luis Millán, Pietro Ciancaglini, ,
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34967

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, Woei Jye Lau, Sajad Rasaee, Kaveh Abbasi
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials; https://doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.34964

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