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Results in Journal American Journal of Critical Care: 3,859

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MD Peter A. Kahn , Malgorzata Cartiera, Msc Walter Lindop, MD Robert L. Fogerty
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 77-79; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021780

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rhonda Board
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 8-8; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021824

Lixue Huang, Man Song, Yan Liu, Wenmei Zhang, Zhenye Pei, Nan Liu, Ming Jia, Xiaotong Hou, Haibo Zhang, Jinhua Li, et al.
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 64-71; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021753

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Bsn Kimberly Bolling , Bsn Takako Long, Dnp Cathy D. Jennings, Francis C. Dane, PhD Kimberly Ferren Carter
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 21-26; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021687

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PhD Cynda Hylton Rushton, Ms Sandra M. Swoboda, Bs Nancy Reller, PhD Kimberly A. Skarupski, Ba Michelle Prizzi, Mbe Peter D. Young, Ginger C. Hanson
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021359

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Jean-Louis Fergé , Mph Rishika Banydeen, Christophe Le Terrier, Hélène Fize, Mathurina Miguel, Nancy Kentish-Barnes, Md Louis Jehel, Anne Moroy, Ruddy Valentino, Hossein Mehdaoui
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 72-76; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021799

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PhD Marta Prats Arimon, PhD Montserrat Puig Llobet, PhD Juan Roldán-Merino, PhD Carmen Moreno-Arroyo, PhD Miguel Ángel Hidalgo Blanco, PhD Teresa Lluch-Canut
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 45-54; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021619

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PhD Ruth M. Lebet , Mph Natalie R. Hasbani, Rn Martha T. Sisko, Michael S. D. Agus, Vinay M. Nadkarni, David Wypij, PhD Martha A. Q. Curley
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 27-35; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021725

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Catherine L. Auriemma , Michael O. Harhay, PhD Kimberley J. Haines, PhD Frances K. Barg, Md Scott D. Halpern, Md Sarah M. Lyon
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 11-20; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021398

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PhD Cindy L. Munro, Md Aluko A. Hope
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 4-6; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021734

Hayato Taniguchi, Tokuji Ikeda, MD Ichiro Takeuchi, Md Shingo Ichiba
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 55-63; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021351

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Ms Linda Berger Spivack, Mpa/id Marla Spivack
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 80-82; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020537

PhD Grant A. Pignatiello
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 36-37; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021923

Md Florian B. Mayr , Judith L. Plowman, Sandra Blakowski, Msw Kimberly Sell-Shemansky, Crnp Joleene M. Young, Md Sachin Yende
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021117

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PhD Salah S. Al-Zaiti, Abdullah Ahmad, PhD Teri M. Kozik, PhD Michele M. Pelter, PhD Mary G. Carey
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 83-84; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021472

PhD Marjorie Funk , Kristopher P. Fennie, PhD Krista A. Knudson, PhD Halley Ruppel
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 38-44; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021122

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Cindy Cain
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 30, pp 10-10; doi:10.4037/ajcc2021103

PhD Jenny Alderden , PhD Linda J. Cowan, Bsn Jonathan B. Dimas, Mstat Danli Chen, Yue Zhang, PhD Mollie Cummins, PhD Tracey L. Yap
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020810

Abstract:
Background Hospital-acquired pressure injuries disproportionately affect critical care patients. Although risk factors such as moisture, illness severity, and inadequate perfusion have been recognized, nursing skin assessment data remain unexamined in relation to the risk for hospital-acquired pressure injuries. Objective To identify factors associated with hospital-acquired pressure injuries among surgical critical care patients. The specific aim was to analyze data obtained from routine nursing skin assessments alongside other potential risk factors identified in the literature. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 5101 surgical critical care patients at a level I trauma center and academic medical center. Multivariate logistic regression using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method identified important predictors with parsimonious representation. Use of specialty pressure redistribution beds was included in the model as a known predictive factor because specialty beds are a common preventive intervention. Results Independent risk factors identified by logistic regression were skin irritation (rash or diffuse, nonlocalized redness) (odds ratio, 1.788; 95% CI, 1.404-2.274; P < .001), minimum Braden Scale score (odds ratio, 0.858; 95% CI, 0.818-0.899; P < .001), and duration of intensive care unit stay before the hospital-acquired pressure injury developed (odds ratio, 1.003; 95% CI, 1.003-1.004; P < .001). Conclusions The strongest predictor was irritated skin, a potentially modifiable risk factor. Irritated skin should be treated and closely monitored, and the cause should be eliminated to allow the skin to heal.
Alyson Takaoka, Meredith Vanstone, Thanh H. Neville, Sophia Goksoyr, Marilyn Swinton, France J. Clarke, Orla M. Smith, Allana Leblanc, Denise Foster, Yuhan Kao, et al.
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 422-428; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020733

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
ScM Lisa Aronson Friedman, Pt Daniel L. Young, Archana Nelliot, Elizabeth Colantuoni, Pedro A. Mendez-Tellez, Fcpa Dale M. Needham, Victor D. Dinglas
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 429-438; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020966

Abstract:
Background Participant retention is vital for longitudinal studies. Home visits may increase retention, but little is known about the subset of patients they benefit. Objective To evaluate patient-related variables associated with home visits. Methods In a 5-year, longitudinal, multisite, prospective study of 195 survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome, in-person assessments were conducted at a research clinic. Home visits were offered to participants who could not attend the clinic. Associations between having a home visit, prior follow-up visit status, and baseline and in-hospital patient variables were evaluated with multivariable, random-intercept logistic regression models. The association between home visits and patients’ posthospital clinical status was evaluated with a subsequent regression model adjusted for these variables. Results Participants had a median age of 49 years and were 56% male and 58% White. The following had independent associations with home visits (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI]): age (per year: 1.03 [1.00-1.05]) and immediately preceding visit incomplete (2.46 [1.44-4.19]) or at home (8.24 [4.57-14.86]). After adjustment for prior-visit status and baseline and hospitalization variables, these posthospital patient outcome variables were associated with a subsequent home visit: instrumental activities of daily living (≥ 2 vs < 2 dependencies: 2.32 [1.29-4.17]), EQ-5D utility score (per 0.1-point decrease: 1.15 [1.02-1.30]), and 6-minute walk test (per 10-percentage-point decrease in percent-predicted distance: 1.50 [1.26-1.79]). Conclusions Home visits were important for retaining older and more physically impaired study participants, helping reduce selection bias caused by excluding them.
PhD Mary G. Carey, PhD Salah S. Al-Zaiti, PhD Teri M. Kozik, PhD Michele M. Pelter
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 493-494; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020827

Grant A. Pignatiello
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 448-449; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020415

PhD Annette M. Bourgault , PhD Jan Powers, Dnp Lillian Aguirre, Robert Hines
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 439-447; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020744

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rhonda Board
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 419-419; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020411

PhD Jean Connor , Mph Lauren Hartwell, PhD Jennifer Baird, Mph Benjamin Cerrato, Mph Araz Chiloyan, Mph Courtney Porter, PhD Patricia Hickey
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 468-478; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020884

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
PhD Marilyn Schallom , PhD Donna Prentice, Msn Carrie Sona, Bs Kara Vyers, Cassandra Arroyo, Brian Wessman, Md Enyo Ablordeppey
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 458-467; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020741

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
EdD Bobbie Ann Adair White, Do Heath D. White, Christie Bledsoe, Randy Hendricks, Md Alejandro C. Arroliga
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020886

Abstract:
Background Conflicts in medical settings affect both team function and patient care, yet a standardized curriculum for conflict management in clinical teams does not exist. Objectives To evaluate the effects of an educational intervention for conflict management on knowledge and perceptions and to identify trends in preferred conflict management style among intensive care unit workers. Methods A conflict management education intervention was created for an intensive care team. The intervention was 1 hour long and incorporated the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument as well as conflict management concepts, self-reflection, and active learning through discussion and reviewing clinical cases. Descriptive statistics were prepared on the participants’ preferred conflict management modes. A pretest/posttest was analyzed to evaluate knowledge and perceptions of conflict before and after the intervention, and 3 open-ended questions on the posttest were reviewed for categories. Results Forty-nine intensive care providers participated in the intervention. The largest portion of participants had an avoiding conflict management mode (32%), followed by compromising (30%), accommodating (25%), collaborating (9%), and competing (5%). Pretest/posttest data were collected for 31 participants and showed that knowledge (P < .001) and perception (P = .004) scores increased significantly after the conflict management intervention. Conclusions The conflict management educational intervention improved the participants’ knowledge and affected perceptions. Categorization of open-ended questions suggested that intensive care providers are interested in concrete information that will help with conflict resolution, and some participants understood that mindfulness and awareness would improve professional interactions or reduce conflict.
Md Aluko A. Hope, PhD Cindy L. Munro
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 415-417; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020334

Vinciya Pandian, Linda L. Morris, Martin B. Brodsky, James Lynch, Brian Walsh, Cynda Rushton, Jane Phillips, Alphonsa Rahman, Troy Derose, Leah Lambe, et al.
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020561

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 489-492; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020694

Kevin B. Laupland , PhD Fiona Coyer
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 450-457; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020136

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
King A. Daniel , Essam Hussein, Gali Epstein Shochet, Yaron P. Bar-Lavie
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 480-483; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020934

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Comment
Rn Shannon A. Cotton, Ms Chelsea E. Roche, Atul Malhotra
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 418-418; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020542

Armeen Poor
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 418-418; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020519

PhD Maya N. Elías, PhD Cindy L. Munro, PhD Zhan Liang
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 484-488; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020132

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Linda Bell
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 479-479; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020231

Med Abigail C. Jones, Ms Rachel Hilton, Bs Blair Ely, Jd Lovemore Gororo, PhD Valerie Danesh, Carla M. Sevin, PysD James C. Jackson, LeAnne M. Boehm
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020149

Abstract:
The theory of posttraumatic growth arose from accounts of various trauma survivors experiencing not only distress but also growth and change. An intensive care unit admission is an unplanned, sudden, and traumatic experience, and many survivors have posttraumatic stress that can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder. Survivors leave the intensive care unit with new functional impairments that drive depression, and they frequently experience anxiety. Amidst the stress of understanding the trauma of an intensive care unit admission, survivors can grow in their world views, relationships, and sense of self. Understanding posttraumatic growth in intensive care unit survivors will inform health care providers on how to help survivors understand their new difficulties after an intensive care unit stay and facilitate growth. This article is a conceptual review of posttraumatic growth, identifiers of posttraumatic growth, and how the tenets of the posttraumatic growth theory apply to intensive care unit survivors. Health care professionals, specifically nurses, can incorporate practices into their care during and after the intensive care unit stay that encourage understanding and positive accommodation of new difficulties brought on by the intensive care unit hospitalization to support survivor growth. Opportunities for research include incorporating posttraumatic growth assessments into post–intensive care unit clinics, self-help materials, and various programs or therapies. Outcomes associated with posttraumatic growth are listed to suggest directions for research questions concerning posttraumatic growth in intensive care unit survivors.
Sarah M. Beesley , Md Eliotte L. Hirshberg, Mstat Emily L. Wilson, Jorie M. Butler, Thomas A. Oniki, Kathryn G. Kuttler, James F. Orme, Ramona O. Hopkins, Md Samuel M. Brown
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 350-357; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020181

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Bsn Debbie Leigher, Bsn Paula Kemppainen, David M. Neyens
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 390-395; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020120

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
PhD Grant A. Pignatiello
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 369-370; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020683

María Soria-Oliver, Bd Begoña Aramayona, Jorge S. López , María J. Martín, José M. Martínez, PhD Raquel Sáenz, Rubén García-Sánchez
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 358-368; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020960

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lakshman Swamy , David Mohr, PhD Amanda Blok, Ekaterina Anderson, Martin Charns, Md Renda Soylemez Wiener, MD Seppo Rinne
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 380-389; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020831

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Md Jin H. Han, Mph Erin M. Collar, PhD Caroline Lassen-Greene, Md Wesley H. Self, Ba Richard W. Langford, PsyD James C. Jackson
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 398-402; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020492

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PhD Judith A. Tate, PhD JiYeon Choi
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 340-349; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020953

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rhonda Board
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 338-338; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020673

PhD Steven Talbert , Msn Christine Wargo Detrick, Bsn Kimberly Emery, Bsn Aurea Middleton, PhD Bassam Abomoelak, Msc Chirajyoti Deb, Devendra I. Mehta, PhD Mary Lou Sole
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 371-378; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020129

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Brandee Pak
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 396-396; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020106

PhD Cindy L. Munro, Md Aluko A. Hope
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020139

PhD Clayton J. Shuman, PhD Deena Kelly Costa
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 403-406; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020421

PhD Teri M. Kozik, Marisa Mitchell, PhD Salah S. Al-Zaiti, PhD Mary G. Carey, PhD Michele M. Pelter
Published: 1 September 2020
American Journal of Critical Care, Volume 29, pp 407-408; doi:10.4037/ajcc2020779

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