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Results in Journal Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World: 33

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Julie Devonald, Lou Kushnick
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 5, pp 9-15; https://doi.org/10.7227/ercw.5.1.1

Jo Manby
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 5, pp 45-88; https://doi.org/10.7227/ercw.5.1.4

James West, Joe Ellery, Jo Manby
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 4, pp 59-111; https://doi.org/10.7227/ercw.4.1.5

Laura Wilson, Sadia Habib
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3, pp 30-41; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.2.3

Jo Manby
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3, pp 43-89; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.2.4

Perlita R. Dicochea
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.2.2

Abstract:
The social force of racism in relation to natural resources plays a prominent role in the development of environmental justice (EJ) studies within the United States. I contend that the dominant paradigm of environmental racism (ER) may encourage superficial applications of race and racism and colorblind approaches to EJ. I argue that race and racism are at times essentialized, which has in part to do with essentialized notions of the environment. The goal of this eco-racial intervention is to encourage more explicit engagement with the dynamic ways that society creates meaning around and makes use of race and natural resources in relation to each other, processes that may include and operate beyond conventional and critical approaches to ER. Spirited by critical ER and racial formation theory, I propose the construct ‘eco-racial justice project’ as part of an alternative framework for evaluating racialization within efforts to achieve environmental justice.
Dolapo Adeniji-Neill
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3, pp 3-16; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.1.1

Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore the socio-cultural and educational contexts of parental expectations of Nigerian voluntary immigrants to the United States. Immigrant or voluntary minorities are people who have migrated essentially of their own volition to the United States, or any other nation, because they seek more economic mobility, or a better life in general, and/or political freedom (Ogbu, 1995). This case study sought an explanation for the success in education attributed to these new African immigrants and their children. This study investigated the relationship among three factors: (a) parental expectations, (b) socio-cultural experiences, and (c) (adult) children’s internalization of their parent’s aspirations for them. The method of inquiry included phenomenological analysis on data collected through participants’ topical life-histories (Giorgio, 1985). The results of the study represent the Nigerian immigrants’ worldviews: a folk theory shared by their cultural and life experiences. The common threads running throughout their responses are ‘education is the number one priority,’ ‘hard work,’ ‘effort begets luck,’ and ‘failure is not an option.’ Nigerian culture had a strong influence on the upbringing and fulfillment of expectations for the children of the participants.
David L. Brunsma, Priya Dua, Thomas J. Keil, Jacqueline M. Keil
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3, pp 32-46; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.1.3

Antoinette L. Allen, Jo Manby, Christopher Searle
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 3, pp 47-82; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.3.1.4

Hum, Louis Bailey, Bethan Harries, Saima Latif, Humaira Saeed
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 2, pp 67-98; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.2.2.4

David A. Bositis, Marika Sherwood
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 2, pp 43-66; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.2.2.3

Saima Latif, Abdul Alkalimat
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 2, pp 33-42; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.2.1.3

Monica White Ndounou, Louis Bailey, Bethan Harries, Saima Latif, Humaira Saeed
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 2, pp 43-85; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.2.1.4

Aneez Esmail, David A. Bositis, Marika Sherwood, Katherine M. Helm
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 28-50; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.1.3

Kristina Graaff, Louis Bailey, Bethan Harries, Agnes Khoo, Valrie Rowe, Barrie Stanhope, Jenny Van Hooff
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 51-84; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.1.4

Louis Bailey, Bethan Harries
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 64-100; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.2.5

Jr. Willie J. Harrell
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 13-27; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.1.2

Abstract:
This essay recognizes the social protest rhetoric of former President Nelson Mandela and Black Consciousness Movement founder Steve Biko as jeremiads that called for social change in the midst of the apartheid despotic structure. Although they employed varying methods while delivering their jeremiads, they sought to fulfill their missions as representatives of justice and social equality. The uncovering of an anti-apartheid jeremiadic discourse in South African social protest—a tradition characterized by a steadfast refusal to adapt to apartheid’s perspectives—indicates a complex failure of the established order. Anti-Apartheid jeremiadic discourse in the South African social protest tradition sought to rebuild or restructure community politics void of apartheid’s regime.
Whitney Naman
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 26-39; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.2.3

Abstract:
At seventeen per cent, Black students represent the second largest school age minority population in public schools in America, while Black teachers make up only six per cent of the nation's teachers. Research explored in this paper demonstrates why there is a discrepancy between the percentage of Black students and teachers and how racial mismatches between teachers and students have negative implications for Black students’ academic achievement and behavior evaluations. There is a specific focus in the paper on a lack of ‘cultural synchronicity’ between White teachers and their Black students and how this disconnect may affect the existence and persistence of the racial academic achievement gap on standardized national achievement tests. Recommendations for recruitment and instructional strategies are presented.
Marc Mauer, Pedro A. Noguera
Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World, Volume 1, pp 40-63; https://doi.org/10.7227/erct.1.2.4

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