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Journal Forests

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Zhi Chen, Guirui Yu, Junhua Yan, Huimin Wang
Published: 13 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100902

Abstract:Canopy temperature (Tc), one of the most important plant ecophysiological parameters, has been known to respond rapidly to environmental change. However, how environmental factors—especially the temperature and precipitation pattern—impact Tc has been less discussed for forest stands. In this study, we investigated seasonal variations and responses of the Tc and canopy-to-air temperature difference (ΔT) associated with environmental conditions in two subtropical forests with contrasting temperature and precipitation patterns—Dinghushan (DHS) (temperature and precipitation synchronous site: hot and wet in the summer) and Qianyanzhou (QYZ) (temperature and precipitation asynchronous site: hot and arid in the summer). The results showed that Tc exhibits clear diurnal and seasonal variations above air temperature throughout the day and year, suggesting that the canopy of both DHS and QYZ is typically warmer than ambient air. However, the canopy-warming effect was substantially intensified in QYZ, and the difference of ΔT between dry and wet seasons was small (−0.07 °C) in DHS, while it was up to 0.9 °C in QYZ. Regression analysis revealed that this resulted from the combined effects of the increased solar radiation and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), but reduced canopy conductance (gc) caused by drought in the summer in QYZ. Sensitivity analysis further indicated that the responses of ΔT to VPD and gc changes were quite divergent, presenting negative responses to the enhanced VPD and gc in QYZ, while there were positive responses in DHS. The high productivity coupled with low transpiration cooling that occurs in a temperature and precipitation synchronous condition mainly contributes to the positive responses of ΔT in DHS. This study reveals the seasonal variations, environmental responses, and underlying causes of Tc under different temperature and precipitation patterns, providing useful information for the regional assessment of plant responses to future climate change.
Magh, Bonn, Rüdiger Grote, Tim Burzlaff, Sebastian Pfautsch, Heinz Rennenberg, Ruth-Kristina Magh, Boris Bonn
Published: 11 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100897

Abstract:Research Highlights: Investigations of evapotranspiration in a mature mixed beech-fir forest stand do not indicate higher resilience towards intensified drying-wetting cycles as compared with pure beech stands. Background and Objectives: Forest management seeks to implement adaptive measures, for example, the introduction of more drought resistant species into prevailing monospecific stands to minimize forest mortality and monetary losses. In Central Europe this includes the introduction of native silver fir (Abies alba) into monospecific beech (Fagus sylvatica) stands. In order to determine, if the introduction of fir would improve the resilience against drier conditions, this study investigates water relations of a mature pure beech and a mature mixed beech-fir stand under natural as well as reduced water availability. Materials and Methods: Sap flow rates and densities were measured in two consecutive years using the heat ratio method and scaled using stand inventory data and modeling. Results: Transpiration rates estimated from sap flow were significantly higher for beech trees as compared with silver fir which was attributed to the more anisohydric water-use strategy of the beech trees. We estimate that stand evapotranspiration was slightly higher for mixed stands due to higher interception losses from the mixed stand during times of above average water supply. When precipitation was restricted, beech was not able to support its transpiration demands, and therefore there was reduced sap flow rates in the mixed, as well as in the pure stand, whereas transpiration of fir was largely unaffected, likely due to its more isohydric behavior toward water use and access to moister soil layers. Thus, we found the rates of evapotranspiration in the mixed beech-fir stand to be smaller during times with no precipitation as compared with the pure beech stand, which was accountable to the severely reduced transpiration of beech in the mixed stand. Conclusions: We conclude that smaller evapotranspiration rates in the mixed beech-fir stand might not be the result of increased water use efficiency but rather caused by restricted hydraulic conductivity of the root system of beech, making mixed beech-fir stands at this site less resilient towards drought.
Fan, Achim Bräuning, Fu, Yang, Qi, Jussi Grießinger, Aster Gebrekirstos, Ze-Xin Fan, Pei-Li Fu, Rao-Qiong Yang, et al.
Published: 11 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100899

Abstract:Intra-annual monitoring of tree growth dynamics is increasingly applied to disentangle growth-change relationships with local climate conditions. However, such studies are still very limited in subtropical regions which show a wide variety of climate regimes. We monitored stem radius variations (SRV) of Pinus kesiya var. langbianensis (Szemao pine) over five years (2012–2015 and 2017) in the subtropical monsoon mountain climate of the Ailao Mountains, Yunnan Province, southwest China. On average, the stem radial growth of Szemao pine started in early March and ended in early October, and the highest growth rates occurred during May to June. Stem radius increments were synchronous with precipitation events, while tree water deficit corresponded to the drought periods. Correlation analysis and linear mixed-effects models revealed that precipitation and relative humidity are the most important limiting factors of stem radial increments, whereas air temperature and vapor pressure deficit significantly affected tree water balance and may play an important role in determining the growing season length and seasonality (i.e., duration, start, and cessation). This study reveals that moisture availability plays a major role for tree growth of P. kesiya var langbianensis in the Ailao Mountains, southwest China.
Ewa M. Kalemba, Bagniewska- Zadworna, Jan Suszka, Stanisława Pukacka, Agnieszka Bagniewska-Zadworna
Published: 11 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100900

Abstract:Shortage of water is a limiting factor for the growth and development of plants, particularly at early developmental stages. We focused on the European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), which produces seeds and further seedlings in large intervals of up to ten years. To explore the beech seedling establishment process, six stages referring to embryo expansion were studied to determine sensitivity to dehydration. The characterization of the response of elongating embryonic axes and cotyledons included a viability test before and after dehydration and measurement of the amounts of electrolyte leakage, concentration, and arrangement of storage materials, changes in chaperone proteins related to water deficit, and accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radicals. Elongating embryonic axes and cotyledons differed in water content, dehydration rates, membrane permeability before and after dehydration, protein, and lipid decomposition pattern, and amount of 44-kDa dehydrin and 22-kDa small heat shock protein (sHSP). Protruding embryonic axes were more sensitive to dehydration than cotyledons, although dehydration caused transient reinduction of three dehydrin-like proteins and sHSP synthesis, which accompany desiccation tolerance. Extended deterioration, including overproduction of hydrogen peroxide and depletion of superoxide anion radicals, was reported in dehydrated embryonic axes longer than 10 mm characterized by highly elevated cellular leakage. The apical part elongating embryonic axes consisting of the radicles was the most sensitive part of the seed to dehydration, and the root apical meristem area was the first to become inviable. The effects of severe dehydration involving ROS imbalance and reduced viability in beech seedlings with embryonic axes longer than 10 mm might help to explain the difficulties in beech seedling establishment observed in drought-affected environments. The conversion of environmental drought into climate-originated oxidative stress affecting beech seedling performance is discussed in this report.
Robert Köhler, Philipp Sauerbier, Gisela Ohms, Wolfgang Viöl, Holger Militz
Published: 11 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100898

Abstract:In contrast to conventional coating processes such as varnishing, plasma powder deposition by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet on wood is not yet widely used. A key advantage of this process is that volatile organic compounds and organic solvents are avoided. In the present work, European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and pine sapwood (Pinus sylvestris L.) were coated with polymer (polyester), metal (aluminum coated silver) or metal oxide (bismuth oxide) particles. Furthermore, a layer system consisting of polyester and metal or metal oxide was investigated. The layer thickness and topography were analyzed with a laser scanning microscope and scanning electron microscope, revealing thicknesses of 2–22 µm depending on the coating material. In general, the chemical composition of the layers was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. The coatings consisting of metal and metal oxide showed a band gap and plasmon resonance in the range of 540 and 450 nm. Through this absorption, the wood may be protected against ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In the water uptake and release tests, the polyester layers exhibited a reduction of water vapor absorption after 24 h in 100% relative humidity (RH) by 53%–66%, whereas the pure metal oxide layers indicated the best desorption performance. The combination of metal oxide and polyester in the one-layer system combines the protection properties of the single coatings against water vapor and UV radiation.
Vu, Tian, Khan, Zada, Bin Zhang, Nguyen, Thi Thanh Huyen Vu, Gang Tian, Naveed Khan, Muhammad Zada, et al.
Published: 11 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100901

Abstract:Indicators measuring industrial international competitiveness are being continuously improved. However, so far, there is no unified perfect indicator to measure the level of international competitiveness of the industry. Based on the market share index (MS), trade competitiveness index (TC), revealed comparative advantage index (RCA), and relative trade advantage index (RTA), we constructed a comprehensive international competitiveness index by combining the variation coefficient and the entropy method. This study aims to compare and evaluate the international competitiveness of the wood processing industry (ICWPI) in Vietnam using a comprehensive international competitiveness index. The data is collected from the top 22 countries and the total import and export volume of the wood processing industry from the repository of official international trade statistics (UN Comtrade) database for 2001–2017. The results found that it is more accurate to use the combined variation coefficient and the entropy method to evaluate the international competitiveness of the wood processing industry, compared to using only a single index. The growth rate of international competitiveness of Vietnam increased rapidly from 2001 to 2007 but slowed from 2008 to 2017. Vietnam has the advantages of natural resources, low labor costs and favorable geographical location. However, the low productivity gains and added industry value have led to a gradual decline in the international competitiveness growth rate of Vietnam's wood processing industry.
Xiaoqian Dan, Zhaoxiong Chen, Shenyan Dai, Xiaoxiang He, Zucong Cai, Jinbo Zhang, Christoph Müller
Published: 10 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100894

Abstract:Soil temperature change caused by global warming could affect microbial-mediated soil nitrogen (N) transformations. Gross N transformation rates can provide process-based information about abiotic–biotic relationships, but most previous studies have focused on net rates. This study aimed to investigate the responses of gross rates of soil N transformation to temperature change in a subtropical acidic coniferous forest soil. A 15N tracing experiment with a temperature gradient was carried out. The results showed that gross mineralization rate of the labile organic N pool significantly increased with increasing temperature from 5 °C to 45 °C, yet the mineralization rate of the recalcitrant organic N pool showed a smaller response. An exponential response function described well the relationship between the gross rates of total N mineralization and temperature. Compared with N mineralization, the functional relationship between gross NH4+ immobilization and temperature was not so distinct, resulting in an overall significant increase in net N mineralization at higher temperatures. Heterotrophic nitrification rates increased from 5 °C to 25 °C but declined at higher temperatures. By contrast, the rate of autotrophic nitrification was very low, responding only slightly to the range of temperature change in the most temperature treatments, except for that at 35 °C to 45 °C, when autotrophic nitrification rates were found to be significantly increased. Higher rates of NO3− immobilization than gross nitrification rates resulted in negative net nitrification rates that decreased with increasing temperature. Our results suggested that, with higher temperature, the availability of soil N produced from N mineralization would significantly increase, potentially promoting plant growth and stimulating microbial activity, and that the increased NO3− retention capacity may reduce the risk of leaching and denitrification losses in this studied subtropical acidic forest.
Shunzhong Wang, Guang Qi, Benjamin O. Knapp
Published: 10 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100895

Abstract:A thorough understanding of carbon storage patterns in forest ecosystems is crucial for forest management to slow the rate of climate change. Here, we explored fine-scale biomass spatial patterns in a secondary warm temperate deciduous broad-leaved forest in north China. A 20-ha plot was established and classified by topographic features into ridge, valley, gentle slope, and steep slope habitats. Total tree biomass varied from 103.8 Mg/ha on the gentle slope habitats to 117.4 Mg/ha on the ridge habitats, with an average biomass of 109.6 Mg/ha across the entire plot. A few species produced the majority of the biomass, with five species contributing 78.4% of the total tree biomass. These five species included Quercus mongolica Fisch. ex Ledeb (41.7 Mg/ha, 38.1%), Betula dahurica Pall. (19.8 Mg/ha, 18.0%), Acer mono Maxim. (12.6 Mg/ha, 11.5%), Betula platyphylla Suk. (7.0 Mg/ha, 6.4%), and Populus davidiana Dode. (4.8 Mg/ha, 4.4%). The five species were also associated with certain habitats; for example, Q. mongolica was positively associated with the ridge habitat and A. mono was positively associated with the valley habitat. Results from this work document the variability in forest biomass across a warm temperate forest ecosystem of north China, with implications for managing and accounting forest carbon.
Andrew Lister, Tonya Lister, Thomas Weber
Published: 10 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100896

Abstract:Forest fragmentation and degradation are a problem in many areas of the world and are a cause for concern to land managers. Similarly, countries interested in curtailing climate change have a keen interest in monitoring forest degradation. Traditional methods for measuring forested landscape pattern dynamics with maps made from classified satellite imagery fall short with respect to the compatibility of their forest definitions with information needs. In addition, they are not easily amenable to interpretation using tools like confidence intervals derived from survey sampling theory. In this paper, we described a novel landscape monitoring approach that helps fill these gaps. In it, a grid of photo plots is efficiently created and overlaid on high-resolution imagery, points are labeled with respect to their land-use by a human interpreter, and mean values and their variance are calculated for a suite of point-based fragmentation metrics related to forest degradation. We presented three case studies employing this approach from the US states of Maryland and Pennsylvania, highlighted different survey sampling paradigms, and discussed the strengths and weaknesses of the method relative to traditional, satellite imagery-based approaches. Results indicate that the scale of forest fragmentation in Maryland is between 250 and 1000 m, and this agrees with compatible estimates derived from raster analytical methods. There is a positive relationship between an index of housing construction and change in forest aggregation as measured by our metrics, and strong agreement between metric values collected by human interpretation of imagery and those obtained from a land cover map from the same period. We showed how the metrics respond to simulated degradation, and offered suggestions for practitioners interested in leveraging rapid photointerpretation for forest degradation monitoring.
Xu Yuan, Kati Laakso, Philip Marzahn, G. Arturo Sanchez-Azofeifa
Published: 9 October 2019
by MDPI
Forests, Volume 10; doi:10.3390/f10100890

Abstract:Lianas (woody vines) are important non-structural elements of all tropical forests. Current field observations across the Neotropics suggest that liana abundance is rising as a result of forest disturbance, increasing atmospheric CO2, and more frequent extreme climate events. Lianas can cause mechanical stress on their host trees, thus increasing mortality, in addition to potentially reducing carbon storage capacity. Furthermore, previous studies have suggested that liana leaves have an overall higher temperature than tree leaves, which presents the question of whether these differences can be extended from the leaf to the canopy. In this context, the ability to detect these temperature differences from a remote sensing platform has so far not been put into test, despite the importance such knowledge can have in large-scale land surface modeling studies and liana extent monitoring. To partially fill this knowledge gap, we acquired thermal infrared data using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system over an intermediate tropical dry forest in Costa Rica, Central America. Classification results from a previous study in the same area were used to subset the thermal infrared images into liana-infested areas, non-liana infested areas, and forest gaps. The temperature differences between these three image components were then investigated using the Welch and Games–Howell post-hoc statistical tests. Our results suggest that liana-infested areas have, on average, a statistically significant higher temperature than non-liana infested areas. Shadowed forest gaps, used as reference, have a cooler temperature than forest canopies. Our findings on the temperature differences between liana-infested and non-liana infested areas support previous leaf-level observations and open the door to the use of new approaches for the classification and modeling of liana infestation in tropical ecosystems.
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