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Journal Hydrology

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Nimi Dan-Jumbo, Marc Metzger
Published: 17 September 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030082

Abstract:Globally, cities in developing countries are urbanising at alarming rates, and a major concern to hydrologists and planners are the options that affect the hydrologic functioning of watersheds. Environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been recognised as a key sustainable development tool for mitigating the adverse impacts of planned developments, however, research has shown that planned developments can affect people and the environment significantly due to urban flooding that arises from increased paved surfaces. Flooding is a major sustainable development issue, which often result from increased paved surfaces and decreased interception losses due to urbanisation and deforestation respectively. To date, several environmental assessment studies have advanced the concept of alternatives, yet, only a small number of hydrologic studies have discussed how the location of paved surface could influence catchment runoff. Specifically, research exploring the effects of location alternative in EIAs on urban hydrology is very rare. The Greater Port-Harcourt City (GPH) development established to meet the growth needs in Port-Harcourt city (in the Niger Delta) is a compelling example. The aim of this research is to examine the relative effect of EIA alternatives in three different locations on urban hydrology. The Hydrologic Engineering Centre’s hydrologic modelling system (HEC-HMS) hydrodynamic model was used to generate data for comparing runoff in three different basins. HEC-HMS software combine models that estimate: Loss, transformation, base flow and channel routing. Results reveal that developments with the same spatial extent had different effects on the hydrology of the basins and sub-basins in the area. Findings in this study suggest that basin size rather than location of the paved surface was the main factor influencing the hydrology of the watershed.
Nura Boru Jilo, Bogale Gebremariam, Arus Edo Harka, Gezahegn Weldu Woldemariam, Fiseha Behulu
Published: 11 September 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030081

Abstract:It is anticipated that climate change will impact sediment yield in watersheds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of climate change on sediment yield from the Logiya watershed in the lower Awash Basin, Ethiopia. Here, we used the coordinated regional climate downscaling experiment (CORDEX)-Africa data outputs of Hadley Global Environment Model 2-Earth System (HadGEM2-ES) under representative concentration pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Future scenarios of climate change were analyzed in two-time frames: 2020–2049 (2030s) and 2050–2079 (2060s). Both time frames were analyzed using both RCP scenarios from the baseline period (1971–2000). A Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was constructed to simulate the hydrological and the sedimentological responses to climate change. The model performance was calibrated and validated using the coefficient of determination (R2), Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), and percent bias (PBIAS). The results of the calibration and the validation of the sediment yield R2, NSE, and PBIAS were 0.83, 0.79, and −23.4 and 0.85, 0.76, and −25.0, respectively. The results of downscaled precipitation, temperature, and estimated evapotranspiration increased in both emission scenarios. These climate variable increments were expected to result in intensifications in the mean annual sediment yield of 4.42% and 8.08% for RCP4.5 and 7.19% and 10.79% for RCP8.5 by the 2030s and the 2060s, respectively.
Ahmed Naseh Ahmed Hamdan, Abdulhussain A. Abbas, Alauldeen T. Najm
Published: 3 September 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030080

Abstract:Recently, the Shatt Al-Arab River has suffered from increased salinization of its water due to the reduction of freshwater from its tributaries, mainly from the Tigris River, which has resulted in long-distance salinity intrusion. Therefore, there is a need to establish a regulator in the Abu-Flus district to prevent salt intrusion. The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of a proposed regulator on the Shatt Al-Arab River with simulations using the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) model. The upstream boundary conditions were the daily discharges of Tigris River and the downstream boundary conditions were the hourly water stages of the Shatt Al-Arab River. The river model was operated by using the daily discharges recorded in 2014 for calibration and verification of the model. Then, a program operated with a suggested regulator and a flood wave assumed a 200 m3/s peak flow for a duration of 27 days. The flooding occurrence period of the flood wave was investigated under the effect of three study cases of regulator gates, which were fully open (case B1), tide gate (case B2), and fully closed (case B3). The results showed that flooding inundation occurred only in two cases (B2 and B3). These results will encourage the construction of the regulator considering certain precautions.
Saba Naz, Muhammad Ahsanuddin, Syed Inayatullah, Tanveer Ahmed Siddiqi, Muhammad Imtiaz
Published: 30 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030079

Abstract:Flooding from the Indus river and its tributaries has regularly influenced the region of Pakistan. Therefore, in order to limit the misfortune brought about by these inevitable happenings, it requires taking measures to estimate the occurrence and effects of these events. The current study uses flood frequency analysis for the forecast of floods along the Indus river of Pakistan (Tarbela). The peak and volume are the characteristics of a flood that commonly depend on one another. For progressively proficient hazard investigation, a bivariate copula method is used to measure the peak and volume. A univariate analysis of flood data fails to capture the multivariate nature of these data. Copula is the most common technique used for a multivariate analysis of flood data. In this paper, four Archimedean copulas have been tried using the available information, and in light of graphical and measurable tests, the Gumbel Hougaard copula was found to be most appropriate for the data used in this paper. The primary (TAND, TOR), conditional and Kendall return periods have been also determined. The copula method was found to be a powerful method for the distribution of marginal variables. It also gives the Kendall return period for the multivariate analysis the consequences of flooding.
Mojtaba Rashvand, Li, Liu, Jiang Li, Yi Liu
Published: 29 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030078

Abstract:In this study, a stress-dependent groundwater model, MODFLOW-SD, has been developed and coupled with the nonlinear subsidence model, NDIS, to predict vertical deformation occurring in basins with highly compressible deposits. The MODFLOW-SD is a modified version of MODFLOW (the USGS Modular Three-Dimensional Groundwater Flow Model) with two new packages, NONK and NONS, to update hydraulic conductivity and skeletal specific storage due to change in effective stress. The NDIS package was developed based on Darcy–Gersevanov Law and bulk flux to model land subsidence. Results of sample simulations run for a conceptual model showed that hydraulic heads calculated by MODFLOW significantly overestimated for confining units and slightly underestimated for aquifer ones. Moreover, it showed that applied stress due to pumping changed initially homogeneous layers to be heterogeneous ones. Comparison of vertical deformations calculated by NDIS and MODFLOW-SUB showed that neglecting horizontal strain and stress-dependency of aquifer parameters can overestimate future subsidence. Furthermore, compared to the SUB (Subsidence and Aquifer-System Compaction) package, NDIS is more likely to provide a more accurate compaction model for a complex aquifer system with vertically variable compression (Cc), recompression (Cr), and hydraulic conductivity change (Ck) indices.
Emmanuel Zúñiga, David A. Novelo-Casanova
Published: 27 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030077

Abstract:The hydrological hazard for the municipality of Yautepec de Zaragoza, State of Morelos, Mexico, is evaluated considering the overflow process of the rivers located in the Yautepec sub-basin. Different scenarios of hydrological hazard were generated to identify those areas with high flood potential using hydraulic modeling for three return periods (Rp) of 50, 100 and 500 years based on statistical analysis of the maximum annual discharge of the Yautepec hydrometric station. We used the Hec-Ras software and geographic information systems (GIS) to model the different flood scenarios. Our results indicate that 10% (1.5 km2) of the total urban area of the municipality will be flooded for a return period of 50 years. About 12% (1.8 km2) of the territory will be affected by flood for a Rp of 100 years. For a Rp of 500 years, approximately 13.5% (2.1 km2) of the municipality’s area will be flooded. Spatially, the central and southern regions of the municipality will be affected by flood heights greater than 1 m for Rp of 100 and 500 years. The northern zone will have heights of less than 0.50 m for Rp of 50 years. Our results can be used as a tool to prevent and reduce the impact of future floods in the municipality of Yautepec de Zaragoza.
Wendso Awa Agathe Ouédraogo, John Mwangi Gathenya, James Messo Raude
Published: 26 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030076

Abstract:Each year, many African countries experience natural hazards such as floods and, because of their low adaptative capabilities, they hardly have the means to face the consequences, and therefore suffer huge economic losses. Extreme rainfall plays a key role in the occurrence of these hazards. Therefore, climate projection studies should focus more on extremes in order to provide a wider range of future scenarios of extremes which can aid policy decision making in African societies. Some researchers have attempted to analyze climate extremes through indices reflecting extremes in climate variables such as rainfall. However, it is difficult to assess impacts on streamflow based on these indices alone, as most hydrological models require daily data as inputs. Others have analyzed climate projections through general circulation models (GCMs) but have found their resolution too coarse for regional studies. Dynamic downscaling using regional climate models (RCMs) seem to address the limitation of GCMs, although RCMs might still lack accuracy due to the fact that they also contain biases that need to be eliminated. Given these limitations, the current study combined both dynamic and statistical downscaling methods to correct biases and improve the reproduction of high extremes by the models. This study’s aim was to analyze extreme high flows under the projection of extreme wet rainfall for the horizon of 2041 of a Kenyan South Coast catchment. The advanced delta change (ADC) method was applied on observed data (1982–2005), control (1982–2005) and near future (2018–2041) from an ensemble mean of multiple regional climate models (RCMs). The created future daily rainfall time series was introduced in the HEC-HMS (Hydrologic Engineering Center’s Hydrologic Modeling System) hydrological model and the generated future flow were compared to the baseline flow at the gaging station 3KD06, where the observed flow was available. The findings suggested that in the study area, the RCMs, bias corrected by the ADC method, projected an increase in rainfall wet extremes in the first rainy season of the year MAMJ (March–April–May–June) and a decrease in the second rainy season OND (October–November–December). The changes in rainfall extremes, induced a similar change pattern in streamflow extremes at the gaging station 3KD06, meaning that an increase/decrease in rainfall extremes generated an increase/decrease in the streamflow extremes. Due to lack of long-term good quality data, the researchers decided to perform a frequency analysis for up to a 50 year return period in order to assess the changes induced by the ADC method. After getting a longer data series, further analysis could be done to forecast the maximum flow to up to 1000 years, which could serve as design flow for different infrastructure.
Ahmad Nemati, Seyed Hossein Ghoreishi Najafabadi, Gholamreza Joodaki, S. Saeid Mousavi Nadoushani, Seyed Ghoreishi Najafabadi, S. Mousavi Nadoushani
Published: 25 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030075

Abstract:Drought monitoring needs comprehensive and integrated meteorological and hydrologic data. However, such data are generally not available in extensive catchments. The present study aimed to analyze drought in the central plateau catchment of Iran using the terrestrial water storage deficit index (TSDI). In this arid catchment, the meteorological and hydrologic observed data are scarce. First, the time series of terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC) obtained from the gravity recovery and climate experiment (GRACE) was calculated and validated by the water budget output. Then, the studied area was divided into semi-arid, arid, and hyper-arid zones and the common drought indices of SPI and RDIe within a timescale of 3, 6, and 12 months were calculated to compare the results obtained from the TSDI by using the meteorological data of 105 synoptic stations. Based on the results, the study area experienced a drought with extreme severity and expansion during 2007–2008. The drought spatial distribution map obtained from three indices indicated good conformity. Based on the maps, the severity, duration, and frequency of drought in the semi-arid zone were greater than that in other zones, while no significant drought occurred in the hyper-arid zone. Furthermore, the temporal distribution of drought in all three zones indicated that the TSDI could detect all short- and long-term droughts. The study results showed that the TSDI is a reliable, integrated, and comprehensive index. Using this index in arid areas with little field data led to some valuable results for planning and water resource management.
Jiping Jiang, Yasong Chen, Baoyu Wang
Published: 20 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030074

Abstract:It is important to identify source information after a river chemical spill incident occurs. Among various source inversion approaches, a Bayesian-based framework is able to directly characterize inverse uncertainty using a probability distribution and has recently become of interest. However, the literature has not reported its application to actual spill incidents, and many aspects in practical use have not yet been clearly illustrated, e.g., feasibility for large scale pollution incidents, algorithm parameters, and likelihood functions. This work deduced a complete modular-Bayesian approach for river chemical spills, which combined variance assumptions on a pollutant concentration time series with Adaptive-Metropolis sampling. A retrospective case study was conducted based on the ‘landmark’ spill incident in China, the Songhua River nitrobenzene spill of 2005. The results show that release mass, place, and moment were identified with biases of −26.9%, −7.9%, and 16.9%, respectively. Inverse uncertainty statistics were also quantified for each source parameter. Performance, uncertainty sources, and future work are discussed. This study provides an important real-life case to demonstrate the usefulness of the modular-Bayesian approach in practice and provides valuable references for the setting of parameters for the sampling algorithm and variance assumptions.
Jun Guo, Guoyu Ren, Mingming Xiong, He Huang
Published: 20 August 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 6; doi:10.3390/hydrology6030073

Abstract:The Haihe River basin of North China is characterized by extremely low per capita water resources and a consistently long-term decreasing trend of precipitation and runoff over the last few decades. This study analyzes the climatological features of rainy season (May–September) precipitation in the Haihe River basin and its branch systems based on a high-density hourly observational dataset during 2007–2017. We show that there are two high-rainfall zones in the basin, with one along the south of the Yanshan Mountains to Taihang Mountains and another along the Tuma River in the south. Rainstorm centers exist amidst the two zones. July generally sees the highest precipitation, followed by August, and May has the lowest precipitation. The major flood season is reached between the third pentad of July and the fourth pentad of August. The precipitation is high at night but low in the daytime. In the pre-flood season before early July, rainfalls mostly arrive at 16:00–21:00 h. After entering the major flood season, the diurnal precipitation has two peaks, one at 17:00–22:00 h and the other at 0:00–7:00 h. In the post-flood season after mid-August, the most rain occurs at night, with the peak appearing at 0:00–8:00 h. The short-duration precipitation is mainly distributed in the mountainous areas, and the long-duration precipitation that contributes most to seasonal rainfalls appears in the plain areas, and the continuous precipitation mostly occurs in the windward slopes of the Taihang Mountains and the Yanshan Mountains. In addition, urbanization process around large city stations may have affected the rainy season precipitation to a certain extent in the Haihe River basin, with large and medium city stations experiencing around 10% higher precipitation than small city stations. However, this issue needs to be investigated exclusively.
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