Refine Search

New Search

Advanced search

Journal Hydrology

-
305 articles
Page of 31
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Published: 18 February 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010012

Abstract:In this paper, three different flash floods episodes were analyzed, which occurred in October 2006, February 2010, and June 2018 in the Chalkidiki peninsula (North Greece). The Soil Conservation Service (SCS) model and a revised assessment of the CN parameter were applied to estimate the flood hydrographs, and Hydrologic Engineering Center's-River Analysis System (HEC-RAS) software was used for the flood simulations. Initially, hydrological and hydraulic models were calibrated at Vatonias watershed (240.90 km2, North Greece), where three rain gauges and one water level station are located. Vatonias is located very close to the Stavros ungauged watersheds and presents similar geomorphology and land use conditions. The effectiveness and accuracy of the methodology were validated using post-flash-flood measurements. The root mean square error goodness of fit was used to compare the observed and simulated flood depths. Critical success index was calculated for the assessment of the accuracy of observed and modeled flooded areas. The results showed that the dense forest vegetation was not capable of preventing the flash flood generation or reducing the peak discharge, especially in small watersheds characterized by short concentration times. The main cause of flash flood generation was the human interference that influenced the hydraulic characteristics of streams and floodplains. The revised assessment of the CN parameter enhanced the estimation and spatial distribution of CN over the entire watershed. The results revealed that the proposed methodology could be a very useful tool to researchers and policy makers for flood risk assessment of higher accuracy and effectiveness in ungauged Mediterranean watersheds.
Published: 14 February 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010011

Abstract:This study assessed the performance of eight general circulation models (GCMs) implemented in the upper Ouémé River basin in Benin Republic (West Africa) during the Fifth Assessment Report on Climate Change. Historical rainfall simulations of the climate model of Rossby Regional Centre (RCA4) driven by eight Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) GCMs over a 55-year period (1951 to 2005) are evaluated using the observational data set. Apart from daily rainfall, other rainfall parameters calculated from observed and simulated rainfall were compared. U-test and other statistical criteria (R2, MBE, MAE, RMSE and standard of standard deviations) were used. According to the results, the simulations correctly reproduce the interannual variability of precipitation in the upper Ouémé River basin. However, the models tend to produce drizzle. Especially, the overestimation of April, May and November rains not only explains the overestimation of seasonal and annual cumulative rainfall but also the early onset of the rainy season and its late withdrawal. However, we noted that this overestimation magnitude varies from one model to another. As for extreme rainfall indices, the models reproduced them poorly. The CanESM2, CNRM-CM5 and EC-EARTH models perform well for daily rainfall. A trade-off is formulated to select the common MPI-ESM-LR, GFDL-ESM2M, NorESM1-M and CanESM2 models for different rainfall parameters for the reliable projection of rainfall in the area. However, the MPI-ESM-LR model is a valuable tool for studying future climate change.
Published: 6 February 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010010

Abstract:Floods are among the most destructive natural hazards that cost lives and disrupt the socioeconomic activities of residents, especially in the rapidly growing cities of developing countries. Jeddah, a coastal city situated in Saudi Arabia, has experienced severe flash flood events in recent years. With intense rainfall, extensive coastal developments, and sensitive ecosystems, the city is susceptible to severe flash flood risks. The objective of this article is to apply an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) model to explore the impacts of flash flood hazards and identify the most effective approaches to reducing the flash flood impacts in Jeddah using expert’s opinions. The study utilizes experts’ judgments and employs the AHP for data analyses and modeling. The results indicated that property loss has the highest probability of occurrence in the events of a flash flood with a priority level of 42%, followed by productivity loss (28%). Injuries and death were rated the least priority of 18% and 12%, respectively. Concerning flood impact reduction alternatives, river management (41%) and early warning system (38%) are the most favorable options. The findings could assist the government to design appropriate measures to safeguard the lives and properties of the residents. The study concludes by underscoring the significance of incorporating experts’ judgments in assessing flash flood impacts.
Published: 25 January 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010009

Abstract:Clarifying hydrologic behavior, especially behavior related to extreme events such as flash floods, is vital for flood mitigation and management. However, discharge and rainfall measurement data are scarce, which is a major obstacle to flood mitigation. This study: (i) simulated flash floods on a regional scale using three types of rainfall forcing implemented in a land surface model; and (ii) evaluated and compared simulated flash floods with the observed discharge. The three types of rainfall forcing were those observed by the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) (Simulation I), the observed rainfall from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transportation (MLIT) (Simulation II), and the estimated rainfall from the Multi-purpose Transport Satellite (MTSAT), which was downscaled by AMeDAS rainfall (Simulation III). MLIT rainfall observations have a denser station network over the Ishikari River basin (spacing of approximately 10 km) compared with AMeDAS (spacing of approximately 20 km), so they are expected to capture the rainfall spatial distribution more accurately. A land surface model, the Minimal Advance Treatments of Surface Interaction and Runoff (MATSIRO), was implemented for the flash flood simulation. The river flow simulations were run over the Ishikari river basin at a 1-km grid resolution and a 1-h temporal resolution during August 2010. The statistical performance of the river flow simulations during a flash flood event on 23 and 24 August 2010 demonstrated that Simulation I was reasonable compared with Simulation III. The findings also suggest that the advantages of the MTSAT-based estimated rainfall (i.e., good spatial distribution) can be coupled with the benefit of direct AMeDAS observations (i.e., representation of the true rainfall).
Published: 24 January 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010008

Abstract:Comprehensive spatially referenced soil data are a crucial input in predicting biophysical and hydrological landscape processes. In most developing countries, these detailed soil data are not yet available. The objective of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the detail needed in soil resource inventories to predict the hydrologic response of watersheds. Using three distinctively different digital soil inventories, the widely used and tested soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) was selected to predict the discharge in two watersheds in the headwaters of the Blue Nile: the 1316 km2 Rib watershed and the nested 3.59 km2 Gomit watershed. The soil digital soil inventories employed were in increasing specificity: the global Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), the Africa Soil Information Service (AfSIS) and the Amhara Design and Supervision Works Enterprise (ADSWE). Hydrologic simulations before model calibration were poor for all three soil inventories used as input. After model calibration, the streamflow predictions improved with monthly Nash–Sutcliffe efficiencies greater than 0.68. Predictions were statistically similar for the three soil databases justifying the use of the global FAO soil map in data-scarce regions for watershed discharge predictions.
Published: 20 January 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010007

Abstract:The editorial team greatly appreciates the reviewers who have dedicated their considerable time andexpertise to the journal’s rigorous editorial process over the past 12 months, regardless of whetherthe papers are finally published or not
Published: 7 January 2020
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010006

Abstract:Permafrost hydrology is an emerging discipline, attracting increasing attention as the Arctic region is undergoing rapid change. However, the research domain of this discipline had never been explicitly formulated. Both ‘permafrost’ and ‘hydrology’ yield differing meanings across languages and scientific domains; hence, ‘permafrost hydrology’ serves as an example of cognitive linguistic relativity. From this point of view, the English and Russian usages of this term are explained. The differing views of permafrost as either an ecosystem class or a geographical region, and hydrology as a discipline concerned with either landscapes or generic water bodies, maintain a language-specific touch of the research in this field. Responding to a current lack of a unified approach, we propose a universal process-based definition of permafrost hydrology, based on a specific process assemblage, specific to permafrost regions and including: (1) Unconfined groundwater surface dynamics related to the active layer development; (2) water migration in the soil matrix, driven by phase transitions in the freezing active layer; and (3) transient water storage in both surface and subsurface compartments, redistributing runoff on various time scales. This definition fills the gap in existing scientific vocabulary. Other definitions from the field are revisited and discussed. The future of permafrost hydrology research is discussed, where the most important results would emerge at the interface between permafrost hydrology, periglacial geomorphology, and geocryology.
Published: 31 December 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010005

Abstract:The quality of groundwater resources in coastal aquifers is affected by saltwater intrusion. Over-abstraction of groundwater and seawater level rise due to climate change accelerate the intrusion process. This paper investigates the effects of aquifer bed slope and seaside slope on saltwater intrusion. The possible impacts of increasing seawater head due to sea level rise and decreasing groundwater level due to over-pumping and reduction in recharge are also investigated. A numerical model (SEAWAT) is applied to well-known Henry problem to assess the movement of the dispersion zone under different settings of bed and seaside slopes. The results showed that increasing seaside slope increased the intrusion of saltwater by 53.2% and 117% for slopes of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. Increasing the bed slope toward the land decreased the intrusion length by 2% and 4.8%, respectively. On the other hand, increasing the bed slope toward the seaside increased the intrusion length by 3.6% and 6.4% for bed slopes of 20:1 and 10:1, respectively. The impacts of reducing the groundwater level at the land side and increasing the seawater level at the shoreline by 5% and 10% considering different slopes are studied. The intrusion length increased under both conditions. Unlike Henry problem, the current investigation considers inclined beds and sea boundaries and, hence, provides a better representation of the field conditions.
Published: 31 December 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010004

Abstract:We present a rigorous mathematical treatment of water flow in saturated heterogeneous porous media based on the classical Navier-Stokes formulation that includes vorticity in a heterogeneous porous media. We used the mathematical approach proposed in 1855 by James Clark Maxwell. We show that flow in heterogeneous media results in a flow field described by a heterogeneous complex lamellar vector field with rotational flows, compared to the homogeneous lamellar flow field that results from Darcy’s law. This analysis shows that Darcy’s Law does not accurately describe flow in a heterogeneous porous medium and we encourage precise laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions these issues are important. We publish this work to encourage others to perform numerical and laboratory experiments to determine the circumstances in which this derivation is applicable, and in which the complications can be disregarded.
Published: 27 December 2019
by MDPI
Hydrology, Volume 7; doi:10.3390/hydrology7010002

Abstract:National level floods affect large sections of the population, and in turn, receive attention from the government and international agencies. Localized natural disasters, including localized floods, do not get the attention of the government and policymakers because their impact is felt within limited geographical areas, despite the fact that these disasters severely affect the livelihood of rural communities. This study examines the impact of localized floods on the livelihood of farmers in Pakistan using a cross-sectional data set collected from 812 households. The empirical results show that localized floods severely affect rural livelihoods, and affected households have lowered cereal crop yields, less income, and reduced food security levels. Farmers adopt a number of strategies, including crop and livestock insurance, bund-making, land-leveling, and tree planting, to combat the impact of localized floods. Among all these mitigating strategies, the tree plantation is ranked as the best mitigating strategy followed by crop and livestock insurance, land leveling, and bund making, respectively. Education, wealth, access to non-governmental organizations (NGOs), extension services, and infrastructure, influence the adoption of measures to mitigate the effect of flood risks. National policy on localized flood risks needs to strengthen local institutions to provide support to families and extension services to train farmers to mitigate the impact of localized floods.
Page of 31
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all