Refine Search

New Search

Results in Journal of General Internal Medicine: 12,548

(searched for: container_group_id:1938)
Page of 251
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
, Richard L. Kravitz
Published: 4 October 2017
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 32, pp 1269-1272; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-017-4190-z

, Gary Winkel, , Nicole Roberts, Heiddis Valdimarsdottir, Simon J. Hall, Hayley S. Thompson
Published: 2 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 549-555; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1288-y

Abstract:
Socioculturally relevant measures of medical mistrust are needed to better address health disparities, especially among Black men, a group with lower life expectancy and higher death rates compared to other race/gender groups. The study aim was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Group-Based Medical Mistrust Scale (GBMMS) in a Black male sample. Data were collected as part of a randomized controlled trial testing educational strategies to support Black men’s decisions about prostate cancer screening. Participants included 201 Black men ages 40–75 years recruited in New York City during 2006–2007. The primary measures included: race-based medical mistrust, health care participation, avoidance of health care, perceived access to health care, health care satisfaction, racial identity, residential racial segregation, attitudes towards prostate cancer screening, and past prostate cancer screening behavior. An exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor structure. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the three-factor model. Internal consistency was high for the total GBMMS and the three sub-scales: Suspicion, Discrimination, and Lack of Support. Construct validity was supported by: significant positive correlations between GBMMS and avoidance of health care and racial identity as well as significant negative correlations with health care access, health care satisfaction, pt?>and attitudes about prostate cancer screening. ANOVA showed that the GBMMS was associated with greater residential racial segregation. Higher total GBMMS scores were associated with not visiting a physician in the last year and not having a regular physician. The present findings provide strong additional evidence that the GBMMS is a valid and reliable measure that may be used among urban Black men.
, Hilary F. White, Daniel Newman, Jerome E. Sobieraj, Manjusha Gokhale,
Published: 4 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 575-580; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1287-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Stephen J. McPhee, , Ginny Gildengorin, Lena Zhang, Ching Wong, , Roshan Bastani, Vicky M. Taylor, Moon S. Chen
Published: 20 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 694-700; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1285-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Rajiv Thakkar, Scott M. Wright, Patrick Alguire, Robert S. Wigton,
Published: 2 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 448-452; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1284-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Crystal Wiley Cené, Jada Bussey-Jones, , Dionne Blackman, Alicia Fernández, Leonor Fernández, , Carol R. Horowitz, Elizabeth A. Jacobs, et al.
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 160-163; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1283-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , , Leila Kahwati, Joel Tsevat, Karin Nelson, Chen-Pin Wang, Mary J. Bollinger, Helen P. Hazuda
Published: 24 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 510-516; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1279-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, for the Community Health and Academic Medicine Partnership Project, Edith Gurrola, Chima D. Ndumele, Bruce E. Landon, James A. O’Malley, Tom Keegan, John Z. Ayanian, LeRoi S. Hicks
Published: 24 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 504-509; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1278-0

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Jeanette W. Chung
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 453-459; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1276-2

Abstract:
General internists and other generalist physicians have traditionally cared for their patients during both ambulatory visits and hospitalizations. It has been suggested that the expansion of hospitalists since the mid-1990s has "crowded out" generalists from inpatient care. However, it is also possible that declining hospital utilization relative to the size of the generalist workforce reduced the incentives for generalists to continue providing hospital care. To examine trends in hospital utilization and the generalist workforce before and after the emergence of hospitalists in the U.S. and to investigate factors contributing to these trends. Using data from 1980-2005 on inpatient visits from the National Hospital Discharge Survey, and physician manpower data from the American Medical Association, we identified national trends before and after the emergence of hospitalists in the annual number of inpatient encounters relative to the number of generalists. Inpatient encounters relative to the number of generalists declined steadily before the emergence of hospitalists. Declines in inpatient encounters relative to the number of generalists were driven primarily by reduced hospital length of stay and increased numbers of generalists. Hospital utilization relative to generalist workforce declined before the emergence of hospitalists, largely due to declining length of stay and rising generalist workforce. This likely weakened generalist incentives to provide hospital care. Models of care that seek to preserve dual-setting generalist care spanning ambulatory and inpatient settings are most likely to be viable if they focus on patients at high risk of hospitalization.
, P. Todd Korthuis, Somnath Saha, Geetanjali Chander, Victoria Sharp, Jonathon Cohn, Richard Moore,
Published: 24 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 517-523; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1275-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Julie Crosson, Sandra Gordon, Sheila Chapman, Peter Gonzalez, Eric Hardt, Leyda Delgado, , Michele David
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 146-154; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1274-4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
LuAnn Wilkerson, , , Donna Elliott
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 86-90; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1273-5

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Carolyn M. Rutter, Malia Oliver, Lisa H. Williams, Paul Ciechanowski, Elizabeth H. B. Lin, Wayne J. Katon, Michael Von Korff
Published: 24 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 524-529; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1272-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sylvia Bereknyei, Andrew Nevins, Erika Schillinger, Ronald D. Garcia, A. Elizabeth Stuart,
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 155-159; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1271-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 82-85; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1270-8

Abstract:
Diversity improves all students’ academic experiences and their abilities to work with patients from differing backgrounds. Little is known about what makes minority students select one medical school over another. To measure the impact of the existence of a health disparities course in the medical school curriculum on recruitment of underrepresented minority (URM) college students to the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. All medical school applicants interviewed in academic years 2007 and 2008 at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine (PSOM) attended an orientation that detailed a required health care disparities curriculum introduced in 2006. Matriculants completed a precourse survey measuring the impact of the existence of the course on their decision to attend PSOM. URM was defined by the American Association of Medical Colleges as Black, American Indian/Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Mexican American, and Mainland Puerto Rican. Precourse survey responses were 100% and 96% for entering classes of 2007 and 2008, respectively. Among those students reporting knowledge of the course (128/210, 61%), URM students (27/37, 73%) were more likely than non-URM students (38/91, 42%) to report that knowledge of the existence of the course influenced their decision to attend PSOM (p = 0.002). Analysis of qualitative responses revealed that students felt that the curriculum gave the school a reputation for placing importance on health disparities and social justice issues. URM student enrollment at PSOM, which had remained stable from years 2005 and 2006 at 12% and 11% of the total incoming classes, respectively, increased to 22% of the total class size in 2007 (p = 0.03) and 19 percent in 2008. The required health disparities course may have contributed to the increased enrollment of URM students at PSOM in 2007 and 2008.
, for the National Consortium for Multicultural Education for Health Professionals, Sylvia Bereknyei, Desiree Lie, Clarence H. Braddock Iii
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 108-114; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1269-1

Abstract:
The National Consortium for Multicultural Education for Health Professionals (Consortium) comprises educators representing 18 US medical schools, funded by the National Institutes of Health. Collective lessons learned from curriculum implementation by principal investigators (PIs) have the potential to guide similar educational endeavors.Describe Consortium PI's self-reported challenges with curricular development, solutions and their new curricular products.Information was collected from PIs over 2 months using a 53-question structured three-part questionnaire. The questionnaire addressed PI demographics, curriculum implementation challenges and solutions, and newly created curricular products. Study participants were 18 Consortium PIs. Descriptive analysis was used for quantitative data. Narrative responses were analyzed and interpreted using qualitative thematic coding.Response rate was 100%. Common barriers and challenges identified by PIs were: finding administrative and leadership support, sustaining the momentum, continued funding, finding curricular space, accessing and engaging communities, and lack of education research methodology skills. Solutions identified included engaging stakeholders, project-sharing across schools, advocacy and active participation in committees and community, and seeking sustainable funding. All Consortium PIs reported new curricular products and extensive dissemination efforts outside their own institutions.The Consortium model has added benefits for curricular innovation and dissemination for cultural competence education to address health disparities. Lessons learned may be applicable to other educational innovation efforts.
, Henry D. Anaya, Steven Asch, Tuyen Hoang, Joya F. Golden, Ahmed M. Bayoumi, Douglas K. Owens
Published: 4 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 556-563; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1265-5

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Mark A. Hall, N. Chantelle Hardy, Joëlle Y. Friedman, Kevin A. Schulman,
Published: 26 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 460-464; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1264-6

Abstract:
Studies of conflicts of interest in clinical research have focused on academic centers, but most clinical research takes place in nonacademic settings. To compare oversight and management of investigators’ financial relationships in academic and nonacademic research settings. Survey of officials at 199 sites that contributed participants to commercially sponsored phase 3 clinical trials published in JAMA or the New England Journal of Medicine in 2006 and 2007. Response rates were 66% for academic medical centers, 37% for nonacademic medical centers (inpatient), and 27% for outpatient nonacademic sites. Almost all academic medical centers (97%) and most nonacademic medical centers (87%) followed written conflict-of-interest policies, whereas 44% of outpatient nonacademic sites had written policies (P< 0.001). Academic and nonacademic medical centers relied mainly on internal institutional review boards (69% and 71%, respectively); outpatient nonacademic sites relied primarily on independent institutional review boards (59%; P< 0.001). Nonacademic sites have substantially different approaches to the oversight and management of financial relationships in commercially sponsored clinical research than academic medical centers. These differences warrant more attention to how financial relationships are monitored in community research settings.
, Judy A. Shea, Elizabeth O’Grady, Lisa M. Bellini, Frank Ciminiello
Published: 13 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 403-407; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1263-7

Abstract:
Medical student interest in internal medicine is decreasing. Whether the internal medicine sub-internship affects intent to pursue internal medicine is unknown. Determine the immediate and longer-term effect of the medicine sub-internship on students’ decision to pursue internal medicine residency. Mixed method, single institution, prospective cohort study. Ninety-two students completing an internal medicine sub-internship in 2006. Survey administered prior to and immediately after the sub-internship and prior to the match. Questions included likelihood of applying in internal medicine and perceived impact of the sub-internship on career choice. Seventy-seven percent of students (N = 63) completed the first two surveys; 63% (N = 58) completed the second and third. Immediately post sub-internship, 21% (N = 13) were less likely to apply in internal medicine and 11% (N = 7) were more likely to apply (net change in plans was not significant, p = 0.38). There was a significant relationship between the perceived impact of the sub-internship and likelihood of applying in medicine (ANOVA comparison across means, p < 0.001). Compared to the second survey, on the third survey more students (41%, N = 24) believed the sub-internship positively impacted their decision to apply in medicine, though overall shifting was not significant (p = 0.39). Key themes describing sub-internship impact included the intense workload, value of experiencing internship, rewards of assuming the physician role, and education received (30%, 25%, 20% and 16% of comments, respectively). Overall, there was not a significant effect of the sub-internship on students’ decision to apply in internal medicine. Additional research about the relative impact of the sub-internship in relationship to other career choice predictors is needed to better address factors that may encourage or dissuade students from pursuing internal medicine.
Asaf Bitton, Carina Martin,
Published: 14 May 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 584-592; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1262-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Mitchell D. Feldman
Published: 17 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 173-173; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1261-9

, Howard Brody
Published: 9 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 470-473; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1259-3

Abstract:
The role of defensive medicine in driving up health care costs is hotly contended. Physicians and health policy experts in particular tend to have sharply divergent views on the subject. Physicians argue that defensive medicine is a significant driver of health care cost inflation. Policy analysts, on the other hand, observe that malpractice reform, by itself, will probably not do much to reduce costs. We argue that both answers are incomplete. Ultimately, malpractice reform is a necessary but insufficient component of medical cost containment. The evidence suggests that defensive medicine accounts for a small but non-negligible fraction of health care costs. Yet the traditional medical malpractice reforms that many physicians desire will not assuage the various pressures that lead providers to overprescribe and overtreat. These reforms may, nevertheless, be necessary to persuade physicians to accept necessary changes in their practice patterns as part of the larger changes to the health care payment and delivery systems that cost containment requires.
, Quyen Ngo-Metzger, Israel De Alba
Published: 10 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 390-396; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1257-5

Abstract:
Racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to report receipt of lower quality of health care; however, the mediators of such patient reports are not known. To determine (1) whether racial disparities in perceptions of quality of health care are mediated by perceptions of being discriminated against while receiving medical care and (2) whether this association is further mediated by patient sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, and patient satisfaction across racial/ethnic groups. A cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample of California adults responding to the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and perceived quality of health care after adjusting for patient characteristics and reports of access to care. A total of 36,831 respondents were included. African Americans (68.7%) and Asian/Pacific Islanders (64.5%) were less likely than non-Hispanic whites (72.8%) and Hispanics (74.9%) to rate their health care quality highly. African Americans (13.1%) and Hispanics (13.4%) were the most likely to report discrimination, followed by Asian/Pacific Islanders (7.3%) and non-Hispanic whites (2.6%). Racial/ethnic discrimination in health care was negatively associated with ratings of health care quality within each racial/ethnic group, even after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and other indicators of access and satisfaction. Feeling discriminated against fully accounted for the difference in low ratings of quality care between African Americans and whites, but not for other racial/ethnic minorities. Patient perceptions of discrimination may play an important, yet variable role in ratings of health care quality across racial/ethnic minority groups. Health care institutions should consider how to address this patient concern as a part of routine quality improvement.
, Molly R. McDaniel, Joseph Feinglass, David W. Baker, , , Gary A. Noskin
Published: 24 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 441-447; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1256-6

Abstract:
This study was designed to determine risk factors and potential harm associated with medication errors at hospital admission. Study pharmacist and hospital-physician medication histories were compared with medication orders to identify unexplained history and order discrepancies in 651 adult medicine service inpatients with 5,701 prescription medications. Discrepancies resulting in order changes were considered errors. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association of patient demographic and clinical characteristics including patients' number of pre-admission prescription medications, pharmacies, prescribing physicians and medication changes; and presentation of medication bottles or lists. These factors were tested after controlling for patient demographics, admitting service and severity of illness. Over one-third of study patients (35.9%) experienced 309 order errors; 85% of patients had errors originate in medication histories, and almost half were omissions. Cardiovascular agents were commonly in error (29.1%). If undetected, 52.4% of order errors were rated as potentially requiring increased monitoring or intervention to preclude harm; 11.7% were rated as potentially harmful. In logistic regression analysis, patient's age > or = 65 [odds ratio (OR), 2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-4.30] and number of prescription medications (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.14-1.29) were significantly associated with errors potentially requiring monitoring or causing harm. Presenting a medication list (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.19-0.63) or bottles (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.27-1.10) at admission was beneficial. Over one-third of the patients in our study had a medication error at admission, and of these patients, 85% had errors originate in their medication histories. Attempts to improve the accuracy of medication histories should focus on older patients with a large number of medications. Primary care physicians and other clinicians should help patients utilize and maintain complete, accurate and understandable medication lists.
, , Joyce Lii, Christine Vogeli, William H. Shrank, M. Alan Brookhart, Joel S. Weissman
Published: 4 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 284-290; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1253-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 30 January 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 316-320; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1251-y

Abstract:
Physicians are reluctant to use decision aids despite their ability to improve care. A potential reason may be that physicians do not believe decision aid advice. To determine whether internal medicine residents lend more credence to contradictory decision aid or human advice. Randomized controlled trial. Residents read a scenario of a patient with community-acquired pneumonia and were asked whether they would admit the patient to the intensive care unit or the floor. Residents were randomized to receive contrary advice from either a referenced decision aid or an anonymous pulmonologist. They were then asked, in light of this new information, where they would admit the patient. One hundred eight internal medicine residents. The percentage of residents who changed their admission location and the change in confidence in the decision. Residents were more likely to change their original admission location (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.04 to 5.1, P = 0.04) and to reduce their confidence in the decision (adjusted difference between means −12.9%, 95% CI −3.0% to −22.8%, P = 0.011) in response to the referenced decision aid than to the anonymous pulmonologist. Confidence in their decision was more likely to change if they initially chose to admit the patient to the floor. In a hypothetical case of community-acquired pneumonia, physicians were influenced more by contrary advice from a referenced decision aid than an anonymous specialist. Whether this holds for advice from a respected specialist or in actual practice remains to be studied.
, Jada Bussey-Jones
Published: 30 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 102-107; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1250-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, M. Bryant Howren, , , Barry L. Carter, Jamie A. Cvengros, Kenneth A. Wallston, Gary E. Rosenthal
Published: 20 February 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 397-402; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-010-1249-5

Abstract:
Past work suggests that the degree of similarity between patient and physician attitudes may be an important predictor of patient-centered outcomes. To examine the extent to which patient and provider symmetry in health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs was associated with objectively derived medication refill adherence in patients with co-morbid diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN). Eighteen primary care physicians at the VA Iowa City Medical Center and affiliated clinics; 246 patients of consented providers with co-morbid DM and HTN. Established patient-physician dyads were classified into three groups according to the similarity of their HLOC scores (assessed in parallel). Data analysis utilized hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to account for clustering of patients within physicians. Objectively derived medication refill adherence was computed using data from the VA electronic pharmacy record; blood pressure and HgA1c values were considered as secondary outcomes. Physician-patient dyads holding highly similar beliefs regarding the degree of personal control that individual patients have over health outcomes showed significantly higher overall and cardiovascular medication regimen adherence (p = 0.03) and lower diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.02) than in dyads in which the patient held a stronger belief in their own personal control than did their treating physician. Dyads in which patients held a weaker belief in their own personal control than did their treating physician did not differ significantly from symmetrical dyads. The same pattern was observed after adjustment for age, physician sex, and physician years of practice. These data are the first to demonstrate the importance of attitudinal symmetry on an objective measure of medication adherence and suggest that a brief assessment of patient HLOC may be useful for tailoring the provider's approach in the clinical encounter or for matching patients to physicians with similar attitudes towards care.
, Elizabeth H. B. Lin, Lisa H. Williams, Paul Ciechanowski, Susan R. Heckbert, Evette Ludman, Carolyn Rutter, , Malia Oliver, Michael Von Korff
Published: 28 January 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 423-429; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-1248-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Sophie Lanzkron, Neda Ratanawongsa, Shawn M. Bediako, Lakshmi Lattimer, Neil R. Powe,
Published: 3 March 2010
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 25, pp 543-548; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-1247-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Dan M. Jacob, Mark Hochhauser,
Published: 3 February 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 489-494; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0914-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Susan L. Ettner, W. John Boscardin, Martin F. Shapiro
Published: 3 February 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 475-481; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0912-1

Abstract:
BACKGROUND African Americans have higher cancer mortality rates than whites. Understanding the relative contribution of cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis and survival after diagnosis to the racial gap in life expectancy has important implications for directing future health disparity interventions toward cancer prevention, screening and treatment. OBJECTIVE We estimated the degree to which higher cancer mortality among African Americans is due to higher incidence rates, later stage at diagnosis or worse survival after diagnosis. DESIGN Stochastic model of cancer incidence and survival after diagnosis. PATIENTS Surveillance and Epidemiology End Result cancer registry and National Health Interview Survey data. MEASUREMENTS Life expectancy if African Americans had the same cancer incidence, stage and survival after diagnosis as white adults. RESULTS African-American men and women live 1.47 and 0.91 fewer years, respectively, than whites as the result of all cancers combined. Among men, racial differences in cancer incidence, stage at diagnosis and survival after diagnosis account for 1.12 (95% CI: 0.52 to 1.36), 0.17 (95% CI: −0.03 to 0.33) and 0.21 (95% CI: 0.05 to 0.34) years of the racial gap in life expectancy, respectively. Among women, incidence, stage and survival after diagnosis account for 0.41 (95% CI: −0.29 to 0.60), 0.26 (95% CI: −0.06 to 0.40) and 0.31 (95% CI: 0.05 to 0.40) years, respectively. Differences in stage had a smaller impact on the life expectancy gap compared with the impact of incidence. Differences in cancer survival after diagnosis had a significant impact for only two cancers—breast (0.14 years; 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.16) and prostate (0.05 years; 95% CI 0.01 to 0.09). CONCLUSIONS In addition to breast and colorectal cancer screening, national efforts to reduce disparities in life expectancy should also target cancer prevention, perhaps through smoking cessation, and differences in survival after diagnosis among persons with breast and prostate cancer.
, Lisa I. Iezzoni, Steven Rauch
Published: 28 January 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 517-519; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0911-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Loree Boyle, Kaveh G. Shojania, Thomas E. Feasby, Carl van Walraven
Published: 21 January 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 520-525; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0910-3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Elizabeth Eckstrom, Gail M. Sullivan
Published: 29 January 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 421-426; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0909-9

, Julia H. Arnsten, Galit Sacajiu, Alison Karasz
Published: 3 February 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 482-488; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0908-x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Christopher L. Bryson, Jason W. Chien, Haili Sun, Edmunds M. Udris, Laura E. Evans, Katharine A. Bradley
Published: 5 February 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 457-463; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0907-y

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Robert El-Kareh, Tejal K. Gandhi, , Lisa P. Newmark, Jonathan Ungar, Stuart Lipsitz,
Published: 21 January 2009
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 24, pp 464-468; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-009-0906-z

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Page of 251
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top