2010 IEEE 6th International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education (WMUTE)

Conference Information
Name: 2010 IEEE 6th International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education (WMUTE)
Date: 2010-4-12 - 2010-4-16

Latest articles from this conference

Daniel Spikol, Johan Eliasson
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 137-141; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.44

Abstract:
The availability of low-cost and powerful mobile devices and 3D modeling and visualization tools provides new opportunities for bringing innovation into mathematics education. This paper reports on the findings from a mobile geometry project pilot for middle school students designed together with teachers that consisted of outdoors and indoors activities. The aim of the project has been to design and implement a prototype that combines mobile and 3D technologies that allow students to collaboratively, explore, and discuss geometrical concepts. The focus of this paper is to present and reflect on the lessons we have learned after experimenting with novel pedagogical activities that rely on mobile applications, 3D modeling and visualization to support learning in the field of geometry. Finding a balance between team goals and expectations while focusing on the learning activity flow can lead to more innovative solutions.
Stis Wu, Alex Chang, , Yu-Ren Yen, Jia-Sheng Heh
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 213-215; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.14

Abstract:
Traditional formal education asks students studying in classroom and listening to teacher's lecturing. Recent years, teachers are taking students out from the classroom and doing field trip for learning history and cultural contents. Students can benefit from situated learning theory by interacting with the historical objects, local people, and cultural atmosphere. This research combines treasure hunting and mobile phone together to create a mobile treasure hunting learning situation for students learning historical and cultural contents during the field trip. In this mobile treasure hunting learning model, students act as hunters who can get hints through their mobile phones to find the treasures - the knowledge of historical and cultural contents. The mobile phones provide students not only display interface of treasure hunting maps and clues, but also position locator and treasure collector. In the experiment that eighteen elementary school students (5th Grade) learning in five-harbor district of Tainan, Taiwan.
Bahtijar Vogel, Daniel Spikol, , Marcelo Milrad
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 65-72; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.41

Abstract:
Recent advances in mobile, wireless, and sensor technologies provide new possibilities for supporting learning activities that can be spatially distributed and incorporate different physical and environmental sensory data. In this paper, we present our technical efforts in relation to the design and implementation of mobile and web applications that integrate sensory data used to support inquiry-based science learning. In order to test the validity of our solution and its functionality and novelty, we conducted a prototype experiment with high school students in the field of environmental sciences. The initial outcomes presented in this paper point towards the potential benefits of using sensor and mobile technologies with real-time geo-positioned data and visualizations, which may increase students' engagement, enabling them to conduct scientific inquiries and analyses in new ways.
Nian-Shing Chen, Daniel Chia-En Teng, Cheng-Han Lee
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 201-203; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.39

Abstract:
We present in this paper a developing project attempting to integrate the strengths of mobile technology into paper-based reading activities to enhance learners' reading comprehension. While conventional print text provides very limited information in fostering learners' comprehension, integrating mobile technology with paper prints is a possible way to offer learners essential content-related resources to make sense of the text. We explored the possibility of this integration, and to verify the practicability of such a system in an English reading practice.
Gregg Orr
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 107-111; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.20

Abstract:
Mobile learning, sometimes referred to as `m-learning' or `handheld learning,' has become a new focus for technical issues as well as pedagogical issues for instructional technology. This paper reviews literature that deals with the definition of mobile learning, distinguishing it from traditional e-learning. It also reviews the affordances and constraints of mobile learning, and addresses how mobile learning is being deployed as a supplement to traditional e-learning or in addition to a classroom. Later, the paper reviews the learning theories that are addressed in the literature, as well as the strategies employed for mobile learning development. Finally the paper reveals some of the gaps in research literature.
, Norshuhada Shiratuddin
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 127-131; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.27

Abstract:
Evaluation of learning media is necessary for determining the effectiveness of the produced media. When evaluating mobile game-based learning (mGBL), conventional usability heuristics evaluations lack comprehension and difficult to be directly implemented. Therefore, heuristics evaluation strategy is proposed to evaluate specifically for mGBL. The strategy consists of four components: Game Usability, Mobility, Game Play, and Learning Content. Each of the components represents the issues to be considered and evaluated for mGBL. Additionally, in this study, a prototype of mGBL was developed and evaluated by utilizing the proposed strategy. The results indicate that the strategy is useful and potential to be implemented for similar mGBL applications.
Takahiro Kayama, , Haruko Miyakoda, Masatoshi Ishikawa
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 207-209; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.46

Abstract:
In an autonomous and collaborative learning environment where learners participate in learning material creation, it is difficult to accumulate materials for abstract words. In this study, we first define the abstraction level of words as well as its measurement method. Next, we prove that learners feel it difficult to create materials for abstract words. Finally, we pre-pare materials based on still images and movies, and compare their learning effect with respect to the abstraction levels of corresponding words to find effective materials for abstract words.
Sarah Lewis, Roy Pea, Joseph Rosen
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 112-116; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.52

Abstract:
While social mobile sites such as Twitter and Facebook have opened new possibilities for human interaction, these applications have barely begun to tap the wellspring of potential for collaborative learning with social media. Although many applications encourage people to be persistently aware of what friends and acquaintances do or care about, rarely do they foster a persistent sense of “doing” or “caring” together. We propose that social mobile applications that support distributed learning communities would benefit from a shift in framing, away from the popular “participation” model of mobile media to a “co-creation” model. We describe a mobile media application in development, “Mobltz”, designed to support collaboration via mobile media co-creation.
, Toru Misumi, Bin Hou, Mengmeng Li, Moushir El-Bishouty, Yoneo Yano
2010 6th IEEE International Conference on Wireless, Mobile, and Ubiquitous Technologies in Education pp 151-155; https://doi.org/10.1109/wmute.2010.18

Abstract:
This paper proposes a personal learning assistant called LORAMS (Link of RFID and Movies System), which supports learners with a system to share and reuse learning experiences by linking movies to environmental objects. We assume that every object has RFID tags and mobile devices have a RFID reader and can record a video at anytime and anyplace. By scanning RFID tags of real objects, LORAMS can provide only video segments that include the objects. Also LORAMS recommends the similar videos to be compared. In LORAMS, the video recording and RFID tagging are used purposely to support further teaching or learning rather than “just record it and use it in some day”. We think that LORAMS can be applied to various kinds of domains that employ several kinds of real objects and vary the results depending on the combination of the objects; for example, cooking, checking upon cars such as oils, battery, and tires, surgery operations and chemical bioreactor experimentation.
Back to Top Top