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, Uwafiokun Idemudia
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, Volume 41, pp 213-238; https://doi.org/10.1080/15426432.2022.2049434

Abstract:
This paper explores the ways in which, as part of their settlement process, Ethiopian immigrants in Canada (1) draw on religious beliefs, practices, and communities; (2) how they employ the teachings of their faith to advance their well-being; and (3) how these practices pattern their resilience and frame how they articulate – and the methods by which they ultimately achieve – their post-migration aspirations. Findings underscore how religion fashions transnational belonging that allows them to maintain multi-stranded social relations, and how this in turn shapes, maintains, and informs their post-migratory lives. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for social work practice.
Morgan E. Braganza, Sandra Hoy,
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, Volume 41, pp 23-50; https://doi.org/10.1080/15426432.2021.1955427

Abstract:
The study of help seeking experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors typically focus on traditional supports such as mental health and community services. Spiritual or religious supports are utilized in ways often overlooked because issues of spirituality and religiosity are infrequently discussed in IPV scholarship and social services. Using qualitative interviews and focus group data of 104 women who survived IPV from three geographic areas in Ontario, Canada, this article explores the usage of intrinsic, informal, and formal spiritual and religious supports by a subset of participants. Implications for social work professionals, including those working in the area of IPV are discussed.
Published: 12 August 2021
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 51, pp 857-877; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211029714

Abstract:
The field of nonprofit studies often assumes that efforts of actors in the nonprofit landscape are beneficial, especially when considering nonprofit human service organizations. However, there are both theoretical and empirical reasons for scholars to adopt a more critical lens when examining these organizations. Taking nonprofit human services organizations as a common setting, the article uses a critical lens to apply classic, “mainstream” theories of the role of heterogeneity in nonprofit sector formation and illuminate risks often neglected in nonprofit human services research. In this way, the article demonstrates that classic social science theories of heterogeneity already offer us the tools we need to critically question dominant assumptions about nonprofit human services provision and challenges the reader to consider why we so rarely use these well-known theoretical frameworks in a critical manner. The article concludes by inviting scholars to utilize additional critical theoretical perspectives in future studies of nonprofit human services.
, John Wilson
Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 60, pp 749-768; https://doi.org/10.1111/jssr.12742

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 7 July 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12070505

Abstract:
Black public activism has been guided largely by black affinities toward the U.S. Constitution, including its core democratic liberalist premises. This range of constitutionally defined political possibilities has both animated (and confined) a sense of public imagination and agency for many black Christians. Divergences and convergences between black religion-based public confidence and dissent are examined here, with reference to three paradigmatic approaches: (1) civil religious patriotism; (2) religious counter-publics; and (3) socio-religious liminality and semi-publics. Contrasts and continuities between these approaches are examined with attention to the impact of these approaches on a beleaguered and diminished American public realm and their relative affirmations or negations of broad understandings and undertakings of public purposes.
Published: 14 June 2021
Journal of religion and health, Volume 60, pp 4061-4081; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-021-01304-8

Abstract:
Preadolescents’ involvement in religious congregations may serve as a distal protective factor against aggression. Interviews were conducted to explore Puerto Rico (PR) Christian church and faith-based organization (FBO) leaders' knowledge and perceptions about preadolescent violence, and the role of congregations in its prevention. Bullying was perceived as the most common type of aggression among PR preadolescents. Education, positive role modeling, and relationships with pro-social adults are considered important in its prevention. While willing to engage in violence prevention efforts, congregations may possess limited knowledge on the topic and its relevance. Findings can help inform the development of collaborative research and prevention efforts at the family and community levels.
MinKyung Kim, Melanie Kwestel, Hyunsook Youn, Justine Quow, Marya L. Doerfel
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 51, pp 279-300; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211013912

Abstract:
The interplay between formal organizing structures and the informal social networks of employees and organizations furthers the resilience of nonprofit organizations that serve the community. This case study draws on qualitative multi-pronged data collected in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey from two faith networks of social welfare organizations serving the vulnerable in Houston, Texas. Results show that hybrid organizing of formal structures and informal networks contributes to organizational and community resilience. By examining both forms of organizing, this article shows how formal structures offer foundational support to the more informal and nimble social networks across the interorganizational partnerships that support the community. As such, this study extends the process orientation toward resilience by documenting how individuals, organizations, and networks expand organizational internal capacities through disaster relief efforts enacted across levels (employee–organization–community).
Holly Tamlin, , Alexandra Hoppe
Published: 18 March 2021
Journal of Community Psychology, Volume 49, pp 1748-1766; https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.22555

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Michelle Shumate
Published: 26 August 2020
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 50, pp 241-261; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764020952167

Abstract:
Although nonprofit collaboration is commonplace, recent research suggests that faith-based organizations (FBOs) are less likely to collaborate than other nonprofits. This study builds on prior FBO, collaboration, and nonprofit capacity research to examine the influence of religiosity and operational capacity on FBOs’ within- and cross-sector partnerships. Findings from a survey with 197 FBOs across the United States reveal a complex picture of how religiosity and operational capacity influence FBO collaboration. More specifically, staff religiosity was positively related to cross-sector partnerships. Service religiosity (i.e., religious elements in staff–client interactions) was negatively associated with collaboration with government agencies. Results also indicated that FBOs with higher operational capacity had more partners in the nonprofit, business, and public sectors. These findings suggest that FBOs generally lack the operational capacity for collaboration and that service religiosity creates additional barriers to it. This article concludes with implications for research in FBOs, interorganizational collaboration, and nonprofit capacity.
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought, Volume 39, pp 248-274; https://doi.org/10.1080/15426432.2020.1760180

Abstract:
Recently, interest has piqued on the effects of neighborhood context on parolee recidivism; however, examinations often neglect to model neighborhood institutions. One type of institution that may be important to neighborhood processes, and moreover, parolee reentry, are houses of worship. Based on the literature, we examine the effect of congregation-oriented (i.e., Evangelical Protestant) and community-oriented (i.e., Catholic and Mainline Protestant) churches on parolee reincarceration. Furthermore, reincarceration was disaggregated to test whether effects were more sensitive to technical parole violations (TPV), or varied by time served on parole. Parolee data were obtained from the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections (PA-DOC) and Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole (PBPP) for 3,077 parolees released to 209 neighborhoods across Philadelphia. Multilevel analyses indicated that community-oriented (i.e., Mainline Protestant, Catholic) churches were not associated with parolee outcomes. Conversely, Evangelical Protestant churches were associated with increased odds of reincarceration, and strongest on TPV reincarceration and after the initial six months following release.
Published: 7 March 2020
Journal of religion and health, Volume 59, pp 1161-1174; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-020-01006-7

Abstract:
This paper emphasises the important role that place has in determining how religious social processes operate and impact on health and wellbeing. It draws upon evidence through qualitative in-depth interviews with families (both parents and children) living in two deprived neighbourhoods in Malta, a ‘traditional’ and a ‘modern’ one. It emerged that religious faith and practices can generate normative and resource-based social capital which can positively impact on health and wellbeing. However, some individuals found this social capital constraining and this had detrimental effects on their wellbeing. The context, composition, history and norms of the place emerge as highly important. This study emphasises that religious social processes operate in a highly complex manner, and ‘adherents’ and ‘disaffiliates’ are likely to enjoy positive or negative health and wellbeing according to where they live and according to important persons living in the neighbourhood such as the parish priest. This study contributes to the research gap between religion, social capital and health and the complex, social processes that operate at the local level of place.
, Lisa A. Dicke
Published: 24 December 2019
Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 30, pp 399-421; https://doi.org/10.1002/nml.21401

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Harold D. Green, , David E. Kanouse, , Michael A. Mata, Clyde W. Oden,
Published: 5 December 2019
Social Science & Medicine (1982), Volume 246, pp 112718-112718; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2019.112718

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Patrick Washington
Published: 5 November 2019
Review of Religious Research, Volume 62, pp 67-82; https://doi.org/10.1007/s13644-019-00390-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
George C Nche
Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies, Volume 37, pp 18-36; https://doi.org/10.1177/0265378819878212

Abstract:
This study explored the role of faith-based organizations (FBOs) in addressing the scourge of cultism in Rivers State. Views were elicited from 16 informants from different parts of the state. Using a descriptive narrative approach, the study revealed that youth unwillingness to work and unemployment were ranked highest among the factors responsible for the menace of cultism in Rivers State. Prayers and occasional enlightenment are the major roles FBOs (e.g. congregations) have played in addressing the menace amidst setbacks such as complicity of politicians, lack of fund and lack of cooperation from parents and local chiefs in some communities in the state. The implications of the findings for FBOs, youths and family are discussed.
Elizabeth B. Lynch, Joselyn Williams, Elizabeth Avery, , Brittney Lange-Maia, Christy Tangney, LaDawne Jenkins, Sheila A. Dugan, , Steve M. Epting
Published: 9 August 2019
Journal of community health, Volume 45, pp 98-110; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-019-00715-9

Abstract:
West Side Alive (WSA) is a partnership among pastors, church members and health researchers with the goal of improving health in the churches and surrounding community in the West Side of Chicago, a highly segregated African American area of Chicago with high rates of premature mortality and social disadvantage. To inform health intervention development, WSA conducted a series of health screenings that took place in seven partner churches. Key measures included social determinants of health and healthcare access, depression and PTSD screeners, and measurement of cardiometabolic risk factors, including blood pressure, weight, cholesterol and hemoglobin A1C (A1C). A total of 1106 adults were screened, consisting of WSA church members (n = 687), members of the local community served by the church (n = 339) and 80 individuals with unknown church status. Mean age was 52.8 years, 57% were female, and 67% reported at least one social risk factor (e.g. food insecurity). Almost all participants had at least one cardiovascular risk factor (92%), including 50% with obesity, 79% with elevated blood pressure and 65% with elevated A1C. A third of participants experienced ≥ 4 potentially traumatic events and 26% screened positive for depression and/or post-traumatic stress disorder. Participants were given personalized health reports and referred to services as needed. Information from the screenings will be used to inform the design of interventions targeting the West Side community and delivered in partnership with the churches. Sharing these results helped mobilize community members to improve their own health and the health of their community.
, Nathan R. Todd
Published: 8 June 2019
Social Justice Research, Volume 32, pp 459-485; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11211-019-00335-7

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Christopher P. Scheitle, Erin B. Hudnall
Published: 4 June 2019
The Sociological Quarterly, Volume 61, pp 164-186; https://doi.org/10.1080/00380253.2019.1583047

Abstract:
Research utilizing routine activities theory has focused on the victimization of individuals and not organizations. Organizations vary in the activities that they engage in, and these activities produce variation in organizations’ exposure to potential offenders. Drawing from routine activities theory and using data on religious congregations, we examine how congregational activities shaped experiences with property crime in the past year. The analysis shows that routine activities are positively associated with theft and external vandalism. These findings contribute to the routine activities literature and highlight a tension between congregations’ desire to serve the community and the risks of that service.
, David P King, Brad R Fulton
Published: 23 May 2019
Journal: Social Compass
Social Compass, Volume 66, pp 400-417; https://doi.org/10.1177/0037768619852230

Abstract:
Religious congregations in the US receive substantially more philanthropic contributions than any other category of organizations, yet little research has investigated how congregations receive, manage, and spend these donations. Although the economic practice of religious giving has been researched extensively, most of this research has focused on individuals or households, seeking to explain why people give to religious organizations. Relatively little research has examined the recipients of religious giving to determine how giving works within and affects these organizations. This review examines studies in the field of congregational finances, assesses available sources of data on congregations’ economic practices, and concludes with recommendations for new avenues of research in this field.
Published: 12 April 2019
Ecology of food and nutrition, Volume 58, pp 265-280; https://doi.org/10.1080/03670244.2019.1598979

Abstract:
Food insecurity has been a persistent problem in the U.S., and yet over the past three decades, federally funded food programs have become more restrictive. Scholars and policymakers have inquired whether the nonprofit sector is increasing its food provision activities to address this unmet need. This study analyzes data from the U.S. Census and a nationally representative survey of religious congregations in the U.S. to examine trends in food insecurity and congregation-based food provision between 1998 and 2012. The objective of the study is to investigate the extent to which congregation-based food provision fluctuated with national food insecurity prevalence for the overall population, and for subgroups vulnerable to this condition. Results show an over-time correspondence between the prevalence of food-insecure households and the prevalence of congregations that provide food. Parallel patterns are observed between food insecurity in disproportionately affected subpopulations (e.g., African-Americans and immigrants) and food provision in the congregations likely to serve those households. These findings indicate that congregations are helping meet the needs of food-insecure households. However, research suggests that congregations and nonprofits are not an adequate substitute for federally funded programs. Policy recommendations include expanding access to federally funded programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to more immigrants and other groups vulnerable to food insecurity, as well as providing more systematic financial or federal support and quality control of congregation-based efforts.
Barbara D. Warner,
Published: 3 April 2019
Journal of Urban Affairs, Volume 41, pp 1183-1204; https://doi.org/10.1080/07352166.2019.1581030

Abstract:
Neighborhood organizations are important aspects of the urban landscape that are increasingly being studied in relationship to crime. However, the neighborhood mechanisms through which organizations are hypothesized to affect crime have rarely been examined. Rooted in social disorganization theory, this study examines the effects of churches—a common and important neighborhood organization—on neighborhood social processes related to crime prevention (i.e., informal social control, social ties, conventional values). These processes are measured with survey data from approximately 2,300 residents in 66 neighborhoods. Several measures for churches are examined in relation to these social processes using multilevel modeling. Data come from several sources, including survey data previously collected for a National Institute of Justice–funded study, the U.S. Census Bureau, and Polk City Directories. Findings show that churches have significant effects on the processes examined; however, the type of church measure used impacts these findings. The total number of churches in the neighborhood and within a buffer zone around the neighborhood, Mainline Protestant, community-oriented (“Bridging”), and Evangelical Protestant churches had significant (or marginally significant) effects on at least one processes examined, although some of these effects were only in disadvantaged neighborhoods.
Published: 18 March 2019
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel10030204

Abstract:
The growing diversity of U.S. communities has led scholars to explore how racial/ethnic diversity effects social capital, civic engagement, and social trust. Less is known about the relationship between diversity and the work of community-based organizations (CBOs). In this study, we examine how the racial/ethnic composition of one ubiquitous type of CBO, religious congregations, is related to measures of organizational bridging social capital. Analyzing data collected through a census of congregations in one Midwestern county, we explore the relationship between racial/ethnic diversity and the bridging activity of religious congregations. We find that multiracial congregations are more likely to be involved with externally focused service programs, tend to support a larger number of programs, and report more interorganizational collaborators than other congregations. Our findings suggest that multiracial congregations can provide a valuable resource for increasingly diverse communities and civil society.
, , Shaila Strayhorn, , David R. Williams, Neil Krause
Published: 6 March 2019
Journal of affective disorders, Volume 250, pp 439-446; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2019.03.021

Abstract:
Suicide and alcohol use disorders (AUD) have high public health and economic costs. We investigate the relationship between religious features that are external to the individual (hereafter, contextual religiosity) and individuals’ risk of AUD and suicidal thoughts.
, Todd Nicholas Fuist, Rhys H. Williams
Published: 21 December 2018
Sociology Compass, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.1111/soc4.12656

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Ann Haas, Beth Ann Griffin, Brad R. Fulton
Published: 2 October 2018
Journal of HIV/AIDS & Social Services, Volume 17, pp 290-312; https://doi.org/10.1080/15381501.2018.1477641

Abstract:
Religious congregations play an important role in HIV prevention and care. However, most research on congregation-based HIV activities has focused on prevention. Using data from a nationally representative survey of U.S. congregations, this study found that 18.6% of congregations were engaged in some type of HIV activity; 8.7% engaged in prevention; 7.6% offered support to people with HIV; 7.4% raised awareness; and 7.6% provided donations for other organizations’ HIV activities. Among congregations that participate in some type of HIV activities, having more educated clergy is associated with higher odds of engaging in support, raising awareness, and giving donations relative to prevention activities. Being a predominantly African-American congregation is associated with lower odds of these other three types of HIV activities compared to prevention activities. Understanding the factors associated with specific types of HIV activities helps inform policy and practice related to congregation-based HIV programming.
, Malcolm V. Williams, Cheryl A. Branch, , Jennifer Hawes-Dawson, Michael A. Mata, Clyde W. Oden, Eunice C. Wong
Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Volume 6, pp 254-264; https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-018-0520-z

Abstract:
Faith and public health partnerships offer promise to addressing health disparities, but examples that incorporate African-Americans and Latino congregations are lacking. Here we present results from developing a multi-ethnic, multi-denominational faith and public health partnership to address health disparities through community-based participatory research (CBPR), focusing on several key issues: (1) the multi-layered governance structure and activities to establish the partnership and identify initial health priority (obesity), (2) characteristics of the congregations recruited to partnership (n = 66), and (3) the lessons learned from participating congregations’ past work on obesity that informed the development of a multi-level, multi-component, church-based intervention. Having diverse staff with deep ties in the faith community, both among researchers and the primary community partner agency, was key to recruiting African-American and Latino churches. Involvement by local health department and community health clinic personnel provided technical expertise and support regarding health data and clinical resources. Selecting a health issue—obesity—that affected all subgroups (e.g., African-Americans and Latinos, women and men, children and adults) garnered high enthusiasm among partners, as did including some innovative aspects such as a text/e-mail messaging component and a community mapping exercise to identify issues for advocacy. Funding that allowed for an extensive community engagement and planning process was key to successfully implementing a CBPR approach. Building partnerships through which multiple CBPR initiatives can be done offers efficiencies and sustainability in terms of programmatic activities, though long-term infrastructure grants, institutional support, and non-research funding from local foundations and health systems are likely needed.
Perspectives on Politics, Volume 16, pp 380-399; https://doi.org/10.1017/s1537592717004248

Abstract:
Studies of the “delegated state” highlight the growing role of nongovernmental organizations to fulfill public purposes. We argue that America’s delegated state has taken two distinct forms: a civic-public model prominent in the North and Midwest and a very different religious-private model more evident in the South and the West. Distinctive regional legacies rooted in European immigration, religion, race, and the timing of urban growth gave rise to diverse organizational configurations for assisting the poor in different parts of the country. As a consequence, the institutions for assisting the poor are weaker in the growing regions of the South and Mountain West.
, Dana Sawchuk
Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, Volume 30, pp 325-353; https://doi.org/10.1080/15528030.2018.1461729

Abstract:
This article is a qualitative examination of how older workers who lost their jobs during the Great Recession and its prolonged recovery employed religion to cope with this stressful experience. Based on 62 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with middle-class adults age 50 or older, our data reveal five distinct themes in relation to religious coping with the job-loss experience: faith as solace, surrendering to God, meaning making, discontent with God or believers, and gaining strength from religious community. Findings are placed in the context of the broader religious coping literature and several empirical and applied implications are discussed.
Jr. Gary J Adler, Andrea L Ruiz
Published: 17 February 2018
Sociology of religion, Volume 79, pp 323-355; https://doi.org/10.1093/socrel/srx060

Abstract:
Short-term mission (STM) travel is a popular religious and civic practice done by religious congregations, but the local conditions that facilitate its production are poorly understood. We analyze organizational factors behind STM travel, with special focus on the role of recent immigrants within congregations. We use data from the third wave of the National Congregations Study. Our results show large differences by religious tradition, as well as the influence of foreign clergy, youth ministry, college-educated members, recent immigrants, and immigrant service orientation. We identify an immigrant effect, theorizing how immigrant presence and identity influence U.S. congregations’ transnational engagement, especially within religious traditions with relatively low levels of recent immigrants. By connecting research on congregational civic engagement with that on transnational immigrant religion, we argue that about 30% of STM travel is a form of civic remittance in which recent immigrants and their U.S. congregations aid foreign communities.
Published: 15 February 2018
Critical Research on Religion, Volume 6, pp 184-204; https://doi.org/10.1177/2050303218757319

Abstract:
Although scholars have thoroughly assessed American Evangelical Protestants’ beliefs about government intervention in addressing socioeconomic stratification and racial discrimination, they have paid considerably less attention to interpretations of health care reform. Especially important is that American Evangelicalism in recent years has incorporated personal accountability in such a way that makes this group distinctive when considering social responsibility toward others. Whereas earlier Evangelicals were instrumental in furthering the social gospel, American Evangelicals today prioritize matters of personal accountability ahead of social action. The cultural toolkit available to Evangelicals includes a rationale for caring for others, but an emphasis on personal accountability shapes how they evaluate government health care interventions. This paper employs qualitative methods to understand how Evangelicals link such individualism with strategies for caring for others in the context of health care. The findings suggest that Evangelicals emphasize personal accountability, especially when evaluating government programs. However, personal accountability is accompanied by a conflicting ethical responsibility to provide care to others. The priority given to personal accountability or an ethic of care, however, varies according to the situational context or social location of white Evangelicals. These findings may be helpful in framing future health policies to draw Evangelical support.
Published: 26 October 2017
Journal of Social Service Research, Volume 44, pp 108-118; https://doi.org/10.1080/01488376.2017.1416725

Abstract:
By 2060, the number of Americans aged 65 and older is expected to more than double, while the number of Americans aged 85 and older is expected to nearly triple. As the nation's aging population grows, older adults will need to rely on social support services, such as transportation and housing services, in order to remain active and lead independent lives. In this study we use data collected from the elderly supplement of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Household Health Survey (SPHHS) (n = 3,042) to explore the relationship between the availability of elderly specific social service providers and utilization of social support services among older adults. We find that while the number of elderly specific social service providers can increase use of social support services among older adults, its impact is relatively minimal. We find that individual factors, instead, are stronger predictors of service use. This is a finding that should be particularly encouraging for elder care providers who may not have the resources needed to undertake large structural changes (like building new facilities). Still, future research should explore how the availability of a broader range of elderly specific social services (than explored in this study) impacts use.
, Kenya McKinley, Leslie Hossfeld, Brittney Oliver, Claudette Jones, Laura Jean Kerr, Maria Trinh
Published: 26 September 2017
Community Development, Volume 49, pp 2-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/15575330.2017.1379029

Abstract:
This exploratory research project identifies critical needs for food pantry delivery in rural Mississippi. Our study describes the experiences of food pantry operators and volunteers while documenting the challenges these pantry providers encounter when attempting to meet the needs of pantry patrons. We interviewed 25 food pantry providers/volunteers at 14 food pantries located in nine counties in Mississippi, representing four geographic areas of the state (North Central, Central, Delta (West), and Southwest). Findings suggest that growing demand for services, coupled with stricter reporting requirements and infrastructure barriers are key challenges that food pantry service providers face. These issues are important to community development studies that focus on how coalition building facilitates community partnerships that support food assistance programs.
, Kathryn P. Derose, Paula Litt, Jeremy N. V. Miles
Published: 13 May 2017
Journal of religion and health, Volume 57, pp 1200-1210; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10943-017-0412-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Nadine F. Bowers Du Toit
Published: 16 February 2017
Hts Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies, Volume 73; https://doi.org/10.4102/hts.v73i2.3836

Abstract:
The findings of an empirical study entitled ‘Meeting the challenge of poverty and inequality in the Cape Metropole: Factors impacting the mobilisation of congregations in their response to poverty and injustice’ reaffirm that the majority of congregations are still largely operating within a ‘relief and welfare’ paradigm with regard to poverty. In attempting to analyse the hindrances to churches’ mobilisation in addressing poverty from a holistic perspective, it became clear that, while there were common challenges (such as lack of capacity and feeling overwhelmed in view of the enormity of the task), several other intersectional issues (e.g. race, class and theological convictions) also play a role with regard to engagement. This article, therefore, analyses and discusses how these factors have an impact on the mobilisation of local congregations in their response to the twin challenge of poverty and inequality.
Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.1177/2378023117742259

Abstract:
The U.S. social safety net for the very poor has been shrinking for several decades. Two factors stand out as potential drivers of this transformation: a neoliberal turn in poverty governance that favors incarceration and other punitive policies and “religious neoliberalism,” which melds neoliberal, anti-statist political ideology with conservative Christian ideals of compassionate assistance administered not by government but through local congregations. Yet these two streams have not been studied simultaneously in relation to welfare retrenchment. Analysis of the demise of state General Assistance (GA) programs using Cox regression models and a unique longitudinal data set shows that higher incarceration rates and higher church density both contribute to the decline of public assistance over time. Findings support the theoretical perspective of religious neoliberalism.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13111164

Abstract:
Few studies have examined the sociocultural determinants of risky sexual behavior trajectories among adult Latinas. To longitudinally examine the link between sociocultural determinants of risky sexual behaviors, we followed a sample of adult Latina mother-daughter dyads (n = 267) across a 10-year span through four waves of data collection. The present study investigates how risky sexual behavior (operationalized as sex under the influence of alcohol or other drugs, sex without a condom, or multiple sex partners) is affected by: (a) socioeconomic conditions; (b) mental health; (c) medical health; (d) acculturation to U.S. culture; (e) interpersonal support; (f) relationship stress; (g) mother-daughter attachment; (h) intimate partner violence; (i) religious involvement; and (j) criminal justice involvement. Results indicate the following factors are negatively associated with risky sexual behavior: drug and alcohol use, treating a physical problem with prescription drugs, religious involvement, and mother–daughter attachment. The following factors are positively associated with risky sexual behavior: higher number of mental health symptoms, being U.S.-born, and criminal justice involvement. We discuss implications for the future development of culturally relevant interventions based on the study findings.
Melissa Intindola, Judith Weisinger, Claudia Gomez
Published: 21 November 2016
Management Decision, Volume 54, pp 2562-2586; https://doi.org/10.1108/md-06-2015-0237

Abstract:
Purpose Studies of multi-sector collaborations have increased in recent years. However, the topic is still complex and lacks synthesis. Toward that end, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how collaboration is addressed in the public administration and nonprofit sector journals, and applies well-established strategic decision-making theories to shed light on possible research directions that would provide rigor to the field of collaboration. Design/methodology/approach The authors conduct a literature review of the top nonprofit and public administration journals, believing these most likely to contain articles on the topic of multi-sector collaboration. Findings The authors identify a number of themes, including need for clarity, temporality, call to collaborate, funding, partnering issues and processes, benefits of collaboration across three different collaborative types. Originality/value The authors embed well-known strategic decision-making theories into the themes emergent from this review and offer suggestions as to how future researchers may test strategic decision-making processes within multi-sector collaborations.
Karen Bullock, Paul Johnson
The British Journal of Criminology; https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azw080

Abstract:
Involving faith-based organizations (FBOs) in the production of crime control has been seen as a way of increasing efficiency, promoting accountability and improving trust and confidence in policing. In this article, which draws on qualitative research, we consider how police officers understand the role of faith in policing, engage with faith communities and work with FBOs to mobilize crime prevention activities. We demonstrate that any effective co-production of crime control that involves faith communities and FBOs requires police officers to negotiate a number of complex and multifaceted issues. We argue that the co-production of crime control has symbolic, moral and technical qualities which all need to be successfully negotiated to achieve its aims.
, Daniel Skinner, Kelly Kelleher
Published: 22 September 2016
Community Development, Volume 48, pp 2-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/15575330.2016.1234492

Abstract:
Health disparities in the US pose a significant challenge to scholars, providers, and community activists. An ongoing transition to population health shifts the focus away from individual health outcomes to the prevention of disease and the wellbeing of communities. This approach, however, requires developing partnerships with communities to enact appropriate interventions. In this article, Evangelical churches, an important community institution in the US, are considered potential stakeholders in future health initiatives. We present qualitative findings from 29 Christian Evangelical Protestants, on how Evangelicals themselves view their role in caring for the health of their communities. Our findings suggest a need for: better understanding of the boundaries between (a) domains that require elite expertise, (b) domains in which non-elites such as pastors and parishioners can play a role, and (c) domains in which elites within churches might play an important role through volunteer efforts.
Published: 20 September 2016
Cogent Social Sciences, Volume 2; https://doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2016.1234670

Abstract:
This study integrates research in the civic community tradition and structuralist and individualist perspectives on poverty to assess the relationship between religious-based civic community structures and family poverty in the United States. Using multilevel analyses of 2006–2008 American Community Survey, 2000 Census of Population and Housing, and 2000 Religious Congregations and Membership Survey data, results demonstrate that the presence of Mainline Protestant and Catholics adherents within communities–measured as the percentage of a community’s population comprised of Mainline Protestant and Catholic adherents–is significantly and negatively associated with family poverty risks, net of other family and community factors. That is, in communities with a greater presence of Mainline Protestants and Catholics, there were also lower risks of families being in poverty. These findings suggest the importance of the ecology of religion within communities in understanding poverty outcomes for families.
, Kathryn Pitkin Derose, Frances Aunon, David E. Kanouse, Laura M. Bogart, Beth Ann Griffin, Ann C. Haas, Deborah Owens Collins
Published: 22 August 2016
Public Health Reports, Volume 131, pp 676-684; https://doi.org/10.1177/0033354916662641

Abstract:
Community-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing at religious congregations has been proposed as a potentially effective way to increase screening among disproportionately affected populations, such as those self-identifying as African American and Latino. Although congregations may provide reach into these communities, the extent to which church-based HIV testing alleviates access barriers, identifies new cases, and reaches people at increased risk for HIV is not well documented. We examined the results of an HIV testing program that was conducted as part of a larger intervention aimed at reducing HIV stigma at five churches in Los Angeles County, California, in 2011-2012. HIV screening identified one positive result in 323 tests but reached a substantial proportion of people who had not been tested before, including many who lacked health insurance. Although this approach may not be an efficient way to identify cases of previously unknown HIV infection, it could help achieve universal testing goals.
Mario De La Rosa, Hui Huang, Judith S. Brook, Mariana Sanchez, Patria Rojas, Mariano Kanamori, Miguel Ángel Cano, Marcos Martinez
Journal of ethnicity in substance abuse, Volume 17, pp 303-323; https://doi.org/10.1080/15332640.2016.1201716

Abstract:
Few studies have examined the socio-cultural determinants of alcohol and drug misuse trajectories among adult Latinas. To assess the associations between socio-cultural determinants and alcohol and drug misuse, we used a longitudinal design to follow a sample of adult Latina mother-daughter-dyads (N = 267) for ten years, and collected four waves of data. They were adult Latinas of Caribbean, South and Central American descent. Specifically, this study investigated the effects of the following factors: (1) Individual Determinants (e.g., socioeconomic conditions, mental health, and medical status); (2) Cultural Determinants (e.g., acculturation to US culture); (3) Interpersonal Determinants (e.g., interpersonal support, relationship stress, mother-daughter attachment, intimate partner violence); (4) Community Determinants (e.g., neighborhood related stress); and (5) Institutional Determinants (e.g., religious involvement, involvement with the criminal justice system). Using hierarchical modeling, we found that taking prescribed medication on a regular basis for a physical problem, religious involvement, and mother-daughter attachment were negatively associated with drug misuse, while involvement in criminal activity was positively associated with drug misuse. Regarding alcohol misuse, results showed that age at arrival in the United States, number of years in the United States, and religious involvement were negatively associated with alcohol misuse, while involvement in criminal activity was positively associated with alcohol misuse. Based on our findings, explicit implications are provided for culturally relevant interventions.
Published: 7 June 2016
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7060071

Abstract:
In the following, we characterize the contemporary conservative Evangelical movement as an example of contentious politics, a movement that relies on both institutional and noninstitutional tactics to achieve political outcomes. Examining multiple institutional and legislative outcomes related to the Faith Based Initiative, we seek to understand why some states have established state faith-based bureaucracies and passed significantly more faith-based legislation. We find that the influence of elite movement actors within state Republican parties has been central to these policy achievements. Furthermore, we find that the presence of movement-inspired offices increase the rate of adoption of legislation, and the passage of symbolic policies increases the likelihood of passage of more substantive faith-based legislation. We argue that the examination of multiple outcomes over time is critical to capturing second order policy effects in which new institutions, the diffusion of legislation and institutions, and increasing policy legitimacy may shape subsequent legislative developments.
, Nathan R. Todd
Published: 28 May 2016
American Journal of Community Psychology, Volume 57, pp 459-472; https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12055

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Published: 19 May 2016
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7050055

Abstract:
Congregations and other religious organizations are an important part of the social welfare system in the United States. This article uses data from the 2012 National Congregations Study to describe key features of congregational involvement in social service programs and projects. Most congregations (83%), containing 92% of religious service attendees, engage in some social or human service activities intended to help people outside of their congregation. These programs are primarily oriented to food, health, clothing, and housing provision, with less involvement in some of the more intense and long-term interventions such as drug abuse recovery, prison programs, or immigrant services. The median congregation involved in social services spent $1500 per year directly on these programs, and 17% had a staff member who worked on them at least a quarter of the time. Fewer than 2% of congregations received any government financial support of their social service programs and projects within the past year; only 5% had applied for such funding. The typical, and probably most important, way in which congregations pursue social service activity is by providing small groups of volunteers to engage in well-defined and bounded tasks on a periodic basis, most often in collaboration with other congregations and community organizations.
Published: 7 May 2016
by MDPI
Journal: Religions
Religions, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel7050051

Abstract:
When congregations seek to address social needs, they often pursue this goal through acts of service and political engagement. Over the past three decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated to analyzing congregation-based service provision and political participation. However, little is known about how congregations’ involvement in these arenas has changed during this period. To help fill this gap, this study analyzes three waves of data from a national survey of congregations to assess how congregations’ participation patterns in service-related and political activities have been changing since the 1990s. It also examines trends among subpopulations of congregations grouped by their religious tradition, ethnoracial composition, and ideological orientation. Overall, this study finds that among most types of congregations, the percentage participating in service-related activities is substantial and increasing, while the percentage participating in political activities is less substantial and decreasing. This decline in political participation has implications for the role congregations play in addressing social needs. Relieving immediate needs through service provision without also pursuing long-term solutions through political participation can limit congregations’ ability to comprehensively address social needs. Among the few types of congregations that have high and/or increasing participation rates in both service-related and political activities are Catholic, predominantly Hispanic, and politically liberal congregations.
, Gail Adorno, Karen Magruder, , Brandi J. Felderhoff
Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging, Volume 28, pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/15528030.2016.1155526

Abstract:
Although the role of religion and spirituality in the lives of older adults is well documented, more research is needed to better understand the role of churches within the context of “age-friendly” cities. Qualitative data were collected (= 60) from six ethnically diverse focus groups and individual interviews of homebound older adults. Study participants emphasized the importance of churches as a source of social connectivity, volunteering, and as a provider of health-related education and informal services. Findings underscore the importance of churches in age-friendly cities and address a critical gap in the literature.
Published: 25 February 2016
Journal of Teaching in Social Work, Volume 36, pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/08841233.2016.1139650

Abstract:
Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have an important presence in contemporary civil society and have gained further prominence through their repertoire of social welfare and services. This study engaged social work educators (n = 316) across nine countries to examine their perceptions of including discourses on faith and FBOs in the social work curriculum. Findings are discussed in terms of intercountry variations on whether FBOs should form a part of the social work curriculum, the curriculum objectives, content, and positioning, and whether the curricular orientation should promote partnerships/collaborations/synergies between FBOs and the discipline of social work.
Published: 1 July 2015
American Journal of Health Promotion, Volume 29; https://doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.130531-quan-280

Abstract:
Purpose. Identify and compare predictors of the existence of congregational human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other health programs. Design. Cross-sectional study. Setting. United States. Subjects. A nationally representative sample of 1506 U.S. congregations surveyed in the National Congregations Study (2006–2007). Measures. Key informants at each congregation completed in-person and telephone interviews on congregational HIV and other health programs and various congregation characteristics (response rate = 78%). County-level HIV prevalence and population health data from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's 2007 County Health Rankings were linked to the congregational data. Analysis. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess factors that predict congregational health programs relative to no health programs; and of HIV programs relative to other health activities. Results. Most congregations (57.5%) had at least one health-related program; many fewer (5.7%) had an HIV program. Predictors of health vs. HIV programs differed. The number of adults in the congregation was a key predictor of health programs, while having an official statement welcoming gay persons was a significant predictor of HIV programs (p < .05). Other significant characteristics varied by size of congregation and type of program (HIV vs. other health). Conclusion. Organizations interested in partnering with congregations to promote health or prevent HIV should consider congregational size as well as other factors that predict involvement. Results of this study can inform policy interventions to increase the capacity of religious congregations to address HIV and health.
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