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(searched for: doi:10.2105/ajph.2017.304042)
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, Pamela K. Meza
Current Opinion in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 34, pp 373-378; https://doi.org/10.1097/gco.0000000000000825

Abstract:
Purpose of review The Dobbs vs Jackson case (Dobbs) decided by the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) in 2022 rescinded the constitutional right to abortion care, resulting in immediate state bans and severe restrictions on abortion care in almost half of the states at the time of submission. This article reviews the current state of abortion education and training as well as available curricula and programmes to support continued training. Recent findings Prior to Dobbs, a national residency-level training programme, the Ryan Residency Training Program, has helped expand abortion care training in residency programs nationally, yet there remained many barriers to incorporating this training into practice, including practice and hospital restrictions. New state restrictions now additionally constrain almost half of all the Ob-Gyn residency programmes. Medical students benefit from education on options counselling and values exploration. Summary Abortion care education and training is in crisis. Almost half of the Ob-Gyn residents are training in states that have banned or severely restricted abortion care. This threatens to create a workforce without critical early pregnancy management knowledge and skills. Residents are more likely to provide abortion care when they have scheduled routine training. Medical students can apply options counselling and values exploration knowledge broadly. Online education resources provide some patchwork solutions to continue abortion care education and training in this heavily restrictive landscape.
, Adi Katz, Frank A. Chervenak
The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care pp 1-5; https://doi.org/10.1080/13625187.2022.2140008

Abstract:
On 24 June 2022, the US Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, a 49-year-old precedent that provided federal constitutional protection for abortions up to the point of foetal viability, returning jurisdiction to the individual states. Restrictions that came into effect automatically in several states, and are anticipated in others, will severely limit access to abortions in approximately half of the US. Even though every state allows for exceptions to the abortion bans, in some instances these exceptions can be used to preserve the health of a pregnant patient, while in other instances, only to preserve their life. The vague and confusing nature of the abortion ban exceptions threatens to compromise the standard of care for patients with pregnancy complications that are distinct from abortions, such as nonviable pregnancies, miscarriages, and ectopic pregnancies. Additionally, we envision challenges for the treatment of women with certain autoimmune conditions, pregnant cancer patients, and patients contemplating preimplantation genetic diagnosis as part of assisted reproductive technologies. The abortion ban exceptions will impact and interfere with the medical care of pregnant and non-pregnant patient populations alike and are poised to create a medical and public health crisis unlike any other one from the recent past.
Published: 19 October 2022
Abstract:
Reproductive coercion encompasses a collection of pregnancy promoting and pregnancy avoiding behaviours. Coercion may vary in severity and be perpetrated by intimate partners or others. Research is complicated by the inclusion of behaviours that do not necessarily involve an intention to influence reproduction, such as contraceptive sabotage. These behaviours are the most common, but are not always included in survey instruments. This may explain why the prevalence of reproductive coercion varies widely. Prevalence also varies when coerced abortion is included in survey instruments. When it is, it seems roughly comparable in prevalence to coercion intended to impregnate. The extent and nature of coerced abortion can also be derived from studies that explore the reasons why women access abortion, the relationship between abortion and intimate partner violence, and online blogs and forums. This narrative review of reproductive coercion examines the evidence and attempts to comprehend why coerced abortion has been neglected.
, Sarah K. Horvath, Eleanor Bimla Schwarz, Alexandra E. Bachorik, Cynthia C. Chuang
Published: 11 October 2022
Journal of General Internal Medicine, Volume 37, pp 4272-4275; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-022-07833-6

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Natasha Rich, Rachel Rapkin
Published: 1 October 2022
Journal of Gynecologic Surgery, Volume 38, pp 339-343; https://doi.org/10.1089/gyn.2022.0068

Abstract:
With the recent changes in U.S. law governing abortion, the topic of abortion provision is all the more important among health care providers. This commentary, from the perspective of physicians who provide abortions, highlights the key points of what makes abortion provision a net-positive ethical/moral action, utilizing the framework of medical ethical principles. The authors discuss how abortion provision applies the medical ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice to achieve safe, quality, and equitable care that improves the lives and well-being of patients. (J GYNECOL SURG 38:339)
, Anna Carroll, Steven P. Hesse, Emily Norkett, Jessika A. Ralph
Published: 1 October 2022
Journal of Gynecologic Surgery, Volume 38, pp 335-338; https://doi.org/10.1089/gyn.2022.0065

Abstract:
Induced abortion in the United States is safe, and complications are rare. Because of their rarity, many clinicians may not have direct experience with managing complications during surgical abortions. This review details the management of hemorrhage, uterine and cervical injury, and infection after surgical abortions. (J GYNECOL SURG 38:335)
Maria Montenegro, Danny Valdez, , , Wen-Juo Lo,
Published: 27 September 2022
The Social Science Journal pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/03623319.2022.2092379

Abstract:
The growth of populations for whom English is not a native language has reinforced the need for multilanguage survey data collections. This is particularly true in the study of sexual and reproductive health issues such as abortion. However, the limited number of bilingual surveys about abortion and the lack of information regarding the translation process for bilingual surveys necessitates the development of new surveys specifically attuned to linguistic and cultural nuances in Spanish-speaking communities. To that end, this paper explores various comparative survey research frameworks, with emphasis on simultaneous survey development through decentering. We also highlight the processes, successes, and challenges of our team’s development of a bilingual English and Spanish abortion survey using Erkut’s Dual Focus Model—an approximation of the asking the same question by decentering (ASQD) approach—to co-construct an English and Spanish survey about abortion in the wake of the nomination and confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme Court. We conclude with recommendations, including that comparative survey research be conducted with team-based and systematic translations.
Published: 25 August 2022
Culture, Health & Sexuality pp 1-16; https://doi.org/10.1080/13691058.2022.2113434

Abstract:
Abortion is a difficult-to-measure behaviour with extensive underreporting in surveys, which compromises the ability to study and monitor it. We aimed to improve understanding of how women interpret and respond to survey items asking if they have had an abortion. We developed new questions hypothesised to improve abortion reporting, using approaches that aim to clarify which experiences to report; reduce the stigma and sensitivity of abortion; reduce the sense of intrusiveness of asking about abortion; and increase respondent motivation to report. We conducted cognitive interviews with cisgender women aged 18–49 in two US states (N = 64) to assess these new approaches and questions for improving abortion reporting. Our findings suggest that including abortion as part of a list of other sexual and reproductive health services, asking a yes/no question about lifetime experience of abortion instead of asking about number of abortions, and developing an improved introduction to abortion questions may help to elicit more accurate survey reports. Opportunities exist to improve survey measurement of abortion. Reducing the underreporting of abortion in surveys has the potential to improve sexual and reproductive health research that relies on pregnancy histories.
, Sitara M. Weerakoon, Matthew S. Mathew, Luyu Xie, Sarah E. Messiah
Published: 24 August 2022
Journal of Interpersonal Violence; https://doi.org/10.1177/08862605221119519

Abstract:
The recent overturning of Roe v. Wade has the potential to adversely impact reproductive health among adolescents experiencing unplanned pregnancies from dating violence. We examined the associations between contraceptive use and dating violence among Texas high schoolers in the years leading up to this new law. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System data from Texas 9th to 12th graders from 2011, 2013, 2017, and 2019 were analyzed. Multinomial logistic regression analyses examined the association between contraceptive use and key descriptive predictors (physical and/or sexual dating violence, survey year, age, sex, and race/ethnic group). Eleven percent of Texas adolescents surveyed reported experiencing either physical or sexual dating violence and 2% reported experiencing both types of violence. Those who experienced any dating violence were significantly more likely to report not using contraception versus those who did not experience violence (12.5% vs. 68.3%, p = 0.01). Adolescents who experienced any type of dating violence were more likely to report using hormonal contraception, condom use, or withdrawal versus those who did not experience dating violence. Hispanic adolescents were 63% more likely than their ethnic group counterparts to use no contraception (odds ratio [OR] 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.11–2.40]). A significant proportion of Texas adolescents reported experiencing dating violence, and this group also reported higher noncontraception use versus those not experiencing dating violence. Given new strict Texas antiabortion laws, dating violence prevention and contraceptive use promotion to prevent unwanted reproductive outcomes such as sexually transmitted infections or unplanned pregnancies are imperative in this age group.
Fabiola Orihuela-Cortés, Asunción Álvarez del Río, Roberto Lagunes-Córdoba,
Published: 19 July 2022
Women's Reproductive Health pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1080/23293691.2022.2094738

Abstract:
Stigma toward women who have had an induced abortion was measured in 458 adult Mexicans and was related to the respondents’ place of residence, religiosity, beliefs about motherhood, ambivalent sexism, age, and personal acquaintance with a woman who had aborted. All participants completed a set of questionnaires that were validated in Mexico. The variables that predicted stigma were religiosity, hostile sexism, age, and beliefs about motherhood as giving meaning to life. The results of this study could facilitate designing strategies to reduce such stigma and its negative consequences on the psychological and physical health of women who have aborted.
, , Miranda Dalton
Published: 7 July 2022
Social Work in Public Health pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1080/19371918.2022.2096736

Abstract:
This study utilized a social media post by a well-known social media influencer and the accompanying 63 responses to explore feelings and experiences related to abortion. This study employed qualitative thematic analysis and identified three themes related to reasons for abortion (i.e., relationship issues, not being ready for pregnancy, and other reasons) and one supplemental theme of bystander support. Findings highlight the efforts of many respondents to normalize abortion as an issue of women’s health and women’s rights. In fact, in response to the original post’s discussion regarding valid reasons for an abortion, most respondents remarked similarly that any reason is valid. While study limitations include concerns regarding generalizability, this study provides access to abortion experiences outside of a traditional health clinic survey and insight into the abortion beliefs of women, both who have and have not experienced an abortion. Findings are in line with previous studies which found that multiple reasons are cited for obtaining an abortion, but also revealed a more supportive climate than the divisive discourse typically portrayed in the media. This suggests the timing may be conducive for efforts aiming to normalize abortion and reduce stigma, including potential avenues for interventions (e.g., social networks and platforms). Lastly, the innovative use of social media to inform this study should be considered by others as they seek to understand and explore topics that can be challenging to study.
, Lisbet S. Lundsberg, Marney A. White, Nancy L. Stanwood, Aileen M. Gariepy
Published: 28 June 2022
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 17 June 2022
by MDPI
Journal of Personalized Medicine, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm12060985

Abstract:
Pediatric spina bifida (SB) and spinal cord injury (SCI) are unfortunately common in our society, and their unique findings and comorbidities warrant special consideration. This manuscript will discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and management strategies for children growing and developing with these unique neuromuscular disorders. Growth and development of the maturing child places them at high risk of spinal cord tethering, syringomyelia, ascending paralysis, pressure injuries, and orthopedic abnormalities that must be addressed frequently and judiciously. Similarly, proper neurogenic bladder and neurogenic bowel management is essential not just for medical safety, but also for optimal psychosocial integration into the child’s expanding social circle.
Robert B. Hood, , Mikaela Smith, , Alison H. Norris,
Published: 3 June 2022
Journal: PLOS ONE
Abstract:
Abortion is highly stigmatized in the United States which prevents its accurate measurement in surveys. The list experiment aims to improve the reporting of abortion history. We evaluated whether a list experiment resulted in higher reporting of abortion experiences than did two direct questions. Utilizing data from a representative survey of adult women of reproductive age in Ohio, we examined abortion history using two direct questions and a double list experiment. Through the double list experiment, we asked respondents to report how many of two lists of health items they had experienced; one list included abortion. We compared weighted history of abortion between these measures and by respondent demographic characteristics (age and socioeconomic status). Estimates of abortion history were similar between direct and list experiment questions. When measured with the two different direct question of abortion history, 8.4% and 8.0% of all respondents indicated ever having an abortion and with the list experiment, 8.5% indicated ever having an abortion. In a Midwestern state-level survey, the list experiment did not lead to increases in abortion reporting as compared to the direct questions. Subgroup analyses require larger samples, and future iterations should incorporate related but non-stigmatized control items to reduce misclassification and under-powering of such subgroup analyses.
, Patricia Kelly, Megha Ramaswamy
Published: 1 June 2022
Journal of Correctional Health Care, Volume 28, pp 172-178; https://doi.org/10.1089/jchc.20.06.0050

Abstract:
Women in the criminal legal system face structural barriers to social resources such as education, employment, and benefits. Little is known how these resources intersect with their reproductive lives, specifically with obtaining abortions. We explored the relationship between social resources and abortion history among women incarcerated in a county jail through a secondary analysis of survey data from a 2014 to 2016 jail-based sexual health intervention. Regression analyses determined correlates of having an abortion history. Thirty percent of participants had an abortion and were more likely to have at least a high school education (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.25–8.77) and a history of sexually transmitted infections (aOR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.25–8.06). Appropriate systems-level efforts should be expanded to support women with criminal legal histories in their reproductive lives.
Published: 27 May 2022
American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 22, pp 22-30; https://doi.org/10.1080/15265161.2022.2075976

Abstract:
The majority of U.S. abortion patients are poor women, and Black and Hispanic women. Therefore, this article encourages bioethicists and equity advocates to consider whether the need for abortion care should be considered a health disparity, and if yes, whether framing it this way would increase the ability of poor women and women of color to get the medical care they need. In order to engage with these critical questions, bioethicists must avoid abortion exceptionalism and respect patients as moral agents. Centering the conscience of pregnant people shifts our analysis away from the ethics of the act of abortion, and toward the ethics of access to abortion care. Because the Supreme Court is on the brink of shifting the question of abortion’s legality to state legislatures, this is the moment for all bioethicists to clarify and strengthen their thinking, writing, and teaching in abortion ethics.
Elizabeth A. Pleasants, Alice F. Cartwright,
Published: 2 May 2022
Abstract:
Abortion is a common pregnancy outcome in the United States and an essential health service, yet many people must travel long distances to reach an abortion facility. As of 2017, 89% of counties within the US did not have a facility providing abortion.1 Myriad state laws across the US make it harder to obtain an abortion. An unprecedented number of increasingly aggressive restrictions have been enacted in recent years, including the 6-week abortion ban in Texas and laws in 26 states that will certainly or likely ban abortion if the US Supreme Court overturns Roe v Wade.2,3 State-level abortion restrictions also influence the geographic distribution of facilities, given that these restrictions may be associated with facilities closing and dissuade new facilities from opening, often where needed most.4-8
Payal Chakraborty, Stef Murawsky, Mikaela H. Smith, Michelle L. McGowan, Alison H. Norris, Danielle Bessett
Perspectives on sexual and reproductive health, Volume 54, pp 54-63; https://doi.org/10.1363/psrh.12191

Si Wang, Kana Wang, Qing Hu, Hua Liao, Xiaodong Wang,
Published: 15 April 2022
Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00404-022-06557-6

Abstract:
Purpose: To investigate the perinatal outcomes of singleton pregnant women with Müllerian anomalies (MuAs). Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted on singleton pregnant women with MuAs who delivered at the West China Second University Hospital between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2020. Results: Four hundred fifty-seven cases of MuAs were identified, with an incidence of 0.40%. The most common anomaly was a septate uterus (38.7%). Compared to the control group, the MuAs group had significantly higher incidences of perinatal complications, including preterm deliveries (PTDs) (27.4 vs. 9.8%, P < 0.001), preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) (29.1 vs. 22.5%, P = 0.001), malpresentation (34.4 vs. 5.6%, P < 0.001), abruptio placentae (4.6 vs. 1.2%, P < 0.001), placental accreta/increta (19.7 vs. 11.8%, P < 0.001), and uterine rupture (2.8 vs. 1.6%, P = 0.035). The rates of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF–ET), foetal growth restriction (FGR), and low birth weight were also significantly higher in the MuAs group (8.3 vs. 4.5%, P < 0.001; 2.6 vs. 0.9%, P = 0.001; 3.1 vs. 1.7%, P = 0.033, respectively). In the MuAs group, the incidence of PPROM was high in cases with unicornuate uterus (31.5%), and malpresentation was as high as 42.4 and 37.0% in cases with septate and didelphys uteri, respectively. Conclusion: The data suggest that pregnancy with MuAs may increase adverse perinatal outcomes, which calls for intensive supervision during pregnancy and delivery to reduce maternal and foetal complications. Individualized considerations should be emphasized according to the different categories of MuAs in pregnancies.
Morgan S. Levy, Vineet M. Arora, Hina Talib, Roohi Jeelani, Cindy M. P. Duke,
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Volume 139, pp 910-912; https://doi.org/10.1097/aog.0000000000004724

Gorkem Turgut Ozer, , Anandasivam Gopal
Information Systems Research; https://doi.org/10.1287/isre.2022.1126

Abstract:
Access to short-term capital remains a pressing problem for many people, especially those facing medical emergencies or needing immediate care. Peer-to-peer lending platforms have the ability to resolve these capital constraints by providing access to small to medium sums of money in an environment that is private and protective of personal information. In this study, we consider how the introduction of P2P lending platforms, and the resulting access to capital, influences local abortion rates, a medical procedure characterized by significant financial barriers and social stigma. We find that the entry of the P2P platform LendingClub is associated with an increase in the rate at which women choose to not carry to term. We argue that the availability of capital through these platforms, when combined with privacy protections, is able to reduce the financial barriers women face when accessing abortion services. This observed effect is stronger in more religious areas and areas with lower levels of education, indicating that social frictions and stigma may be higher in these areas, and also showing where providing an additional channel for funding is more influential.
Published: 18 March 2022
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Dana Northcraft, Fabiola Carrión
Published: 17 March 2022
Frontiers in Global Women's Health, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.3389/fgwh.2022.805767

Abstract:
Telehealth, one of the newest health innovations, has been promoted as a tool to enhance access to health care services in ways that center patient needs. However, integrating telehealth within an inequitable health system undermines its potential. This perspective highlights policies and practices that foster structural inequities and names their impact on the use and acceptability of telehealth for medication abortion among specific communities of color. Communities of color have a higher prevalence of abortion use but face many barriers, including financial and geographic barriers, to abortion access. Preliminary evidence on telehealth for medication abortion shows that it is highly acceptable, accommodating of patient needs, and may allow patients to access abortion care at earlier gestational ages. However, evidence during the COVID-19 pandemic shows that utilization of telehealth is lower among communities of color. We describe how systemic barriers, including regulations on or laws banning telehealth for medication abortion, disinvestments in digital access, and restrictions on public insurance coverage, could perpetuate lower utilization of telehealth for medication abortion care among communities of color. We call for systems changes that will remove these barriers and make this health care innovation available to all who may desire it.
, Troy Quast
Published: 13 March 2022
Economics & Human Biology, Volume 46; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ehb.2022.101120

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Gabrielle R. Magalski, Yen P. Doan, Sydney Bowman
The New England Journal of Medicine, Volume 386, pp 707-709; https://doi.org/10.1056/nejmp2117368

Abstract:
The Supreme Court’s decision to hear a case challenging a restrictive Mississippi abortion law could dramatically change the landscape of abortion care in the United States. It could also allow states to impose new regulations on training related to reproductive health.
, Katharine O. White, Elisabeth Woodhams, Rushina Pancholi, Leanne Yinusa-Nyahkoon
Obstetrics & Gynecology, Volume 139, pp 407-416; https://doi.org/10.1097/aog.0000000000004675

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: To explore Black women's lived experiences of racism and the associated effects on reproductive health decisions and the reproductive health care experience. METHODS: We recruited participants through social media and community outreach. We conducted semi-structured individual interviews focusing on Black women's lived experiences of racism and their effects on reproductive health. We coded and analyzed interview transcripts using process coding methodology. RESULTS: Participants (N=21) were 21–45 years old and from Boston, Chicago, and Atlanta. Our primary themes were: 1) reproductive health racism across the life course, 2) anti-Black racism in the reproductive health care system, and 3) self-protective actions when interacting with the reproductive health care system. Reproductive racism across the life course included subthemes of early sexualization of Black women, heightened awareness of reproductive health inequities, and knowledge of reproductive oppression. Anti-Black racism in the reproductive health care system included subthemes of absence of shared decision making; vicarious reproductive health experiences; stereotyping, invalidation, and dismissal by reproductive health professionals; and medical mistrust. Participants guarded themselves against racism within reproductive health care by engaging in a variety of self-protective actions including seeking a health care professional of color, overpreparing for their appointments, enlisting advocates, seeking care only when desperate, and heightening symptoms to be heard. CONCLUSION: Personal, vicarious, and historical experiences of racism within reproductive health care triggered participants to perform self-protective actions when interacting with the reproductive health care system. These actions served to promote safety, autonomy and rehumanization within a system that has historically and contemporarily devalued Black reproductive health.
, Lauren Ralph, Natalie Morris, , Jamila Perritt, Nathalie Kapp, Kelly Blanchard, , Rana Barar,
Published: 23 January 2022
Journal: Contraception
Contraception, Volume 109, pp 25-31; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2022.01.010

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Lauren K. Hunt, Carly M. Goldstein, Camille L. Garnsey, Katherine W. Bogen,
Published: 20 January 2022
Women's Reproductive Health, Volume 9, pp 237-258; https://doi.org/10.1080/23293691.2021.2016161

Abstract:
Thematic content analysis was used to examine 1,151 tweets that mention the hashtags #YouKnowMe or #YouKnowUs, which trended in 2019 in response to anti-abortion legislation proposed in two U.S. states. Most tweets were pro-choice, centered on positive experiences, and focused on building community. Major themes in the data included personal abortion disclosures, general reflections on abortion, hashtag commentary, links and awareness raising, and a call to action. Individuals who disclosed their own abortions cited factors that influenced their decision. Tweets countered the belief that women regret abortion. Findings showcase the use of social media to raise awareness regarding abortion experiences.
, Brooke H. Wolfe, Cimmiaron F. Alvarez
Published: 7 January 2022
Journal of Family Communication, Volume 22, pp 104-118; https://doi.org/10.1080/15267431.2021.2019743

Abstract:
Women who have late-term abortions not only have to cope with losing a child but also the stigma associated with termination. Understanding the ways stigmatizing ideologies are resisted by alternatives has the potential to disrupt meanings that disenfranchise populations. Interested in ideological resistance, we framed this study in relational dialectics theory, which highlights how marginalized discourses resist dominant ones to make meaning of a semantic object. We used RDT’s corresponding method, contrapuntal analysis, which revealed two discourses that competed to illuminate the meanings of women who terminate wanted pregnancies due to health complications (WTHC): the Discourse of Independent Murder (DIM) and the Discourse of Collective Sacrifice (DCS). These discourses interplayed through contractive practices (i.e., disqualification, naturalization, ideal violation), synchronic interplay (i.e., entertaining, countering, negating), and dialogic transformation (i.e., hybridization and aesthetic moment) illustrating a struggle that both reified and resisted the DIM. Theoretical implications and practical applications are discussed.
Published: 1 January 2022
Journal of Family Social Work, Volume 25, pp 44-63; https://doi.org/10.1080/10522158.2022.2049666

Abstract:
Current sexual health outcomes disproportionately represent Black adolescent and young adult females. The significance of this conceptual review is to first highlight reduced access to traditional forms of sexual health resources and the urgency for innovative social work intervention. Secondly, I present an overview of fatherhood literature that points to the value of Black father–daughter relationships pertaining to sexual health. Recent policies have insufficiently addressed the sexual health needs of many young Black females, and the Black father, despite historically damaging images of his engagement, may offer immediate support to a daughter’s sexual health decision making processes. While large scale structural changes are needed for developing effective health policies, in the interim, benefits of Black father engagement through sexual communication training and education may support the healthy sexual decisions of daughters.
Madeline Adams, Gennifer Kully, Sarah Tilford, , , Marisa Hildebrand, , Daniel Grossman,
Published: 27 December 2021
Journal: Contraception
Contraception, Volume 110, pp 76-80; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2021.12.009

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Julia Mathis
Published: 27 December 2021
Journal: Contraception
Contraception, Volume 109, pp 32-36; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2021.12.010

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Maha K. Younes, , Carly Franklin
Published: 20 December 2021
Journal: Affilia
Affilia, Volume 37, pp 215-231; https://doi.org/10.1177/08861099211068241

Abstract:
Despite social work's stated commitment to abortion rights, research on this topic is not prolific within the discipline (Begun et al., 2016). If we are to live up to our ethical principles, this should be changed. The authors posit that increasing students’ exposure to and understanding of abortion is necessary in the preparation of competent social work practitioners. Using Begun et al.’s (2016) Social Workers’ Abortion Attitudes, Knowledge, and Training questionnaire, the authors expanded the survey by creating additional questions about social work curriculum coverage and training experiences, as well as further content on abortion. Findings indicate that most social work students believe abortion should be legal in at least some circumstances, and also that abortion laws should be less restrictive in the United States. Reported religion and political affiliation had significant effects on several of the abortion attitude statements. Only 7.2% of respondents indicated that abortion is regularly discussed in social work classrooms, and only 2.7% of respondents report they have received training on the topic of abortion in their field placement. The results suggest that social work curriculum coverage on reproductive justice is tenuous and inconsistent at best, leaving students to grapple without the necessary professional foundation.
Published: 26 November 2021
Abstract:
Abortion care is a crucial part of reproductive healthcare. Nevertheless, its availability is constrained by numerous forces, including care referrals within the larger healthcare system. Using a unique study of physician faculty across multiple specialties, we examine the factors associated with doctors’ ability to refer patients for abortion care among those who were willing to consult in the care of a patient seeking an abortion (N=674). Even though they were willing to refer a patient for an abortion, half (53%) of the physicians did not know how and whom to make those referrals, though they care for patients who may need them. Those with the least referral knowledge had not been taught abortion care during their medical training and were in earlier stages of their career than those who had more knowledge. This research exposes another obstacle for those seeking an abortion, a barrier that would be overcome with a clear and robust referral system within and across medical specialties.
Katherine Kortsmit, Michele G. Mandel, Jennifer A. Reeves, Elizabeth Clark, H. Pamela Pagano, Antoinette Nguyen, Emily E. Petersen, Maura K. Whiteman
Mmwr. Surveillance Summaries, Volume 70, pp 1-29; https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.ss7009a1

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