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(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764017728366)
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, Megan Meyer, Jenny Afkinich
Published: 28 September 2021
Journal of Social Work Education pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/10437797.2021.1969299

Abstract:
Equitable opportunities for performance measurement learning among social work graduate students can create a diverse professional pipeline toward higher performing organizations. A Foundation-University partnership was developed to “expand the bench” of students, primarily of color, trained in performance measurement with the Results-Based Accountability (RBA) framework. Through an RBA designed course, 140 (50% of color, and 80% women) students engaged in team-based application of learning in “real-time” projects with partner organizations. Mixed-methods data collection showed that 90% of students performed successfully in graded content learning and project application of performance measurement. Students were empowered to apply RBA in current and future work. These skills can enable students as professionals to make data-driven decisions and achieve a results-oriented, learning-focused culture within agencies to benefit consumers and communities.
Larissa Martinatto Da Costa, , Rosana Da Rosa Portella Tondolo, André Andrade Longaray,
Published: 22 May 2020
Latin American Business Review, Volume 21, pp 393-415; https://doi.org/10.1080/10978526.2020.1768540

Abstract:
Dynamics capabilities (DCs) is a relevant approach for understanding performance in the for-profit environment. However, due to the lack of studies, we cannot say the same about the nonprofit environment. Based on this potential gap, this study validates a scale to measure the DCs in the context of the Nonprofit Sector and also verifies the relationship of DCs in the performance of these organizations. Data from a survey with 169 Brazilian nonprofit organizations were analyzed through the application of confirmatory factorial analysis. The results suggest that adaptive, absorptive, mobilizing, and innovative capabilities comprise the DCs of nonprofit organizations, and the performance of these organizations can be measured by the dimensions of control and growth mechanisms. In addition, DCs have a direct and significant effect on the performance of the studied organizations.
Published: 24 April 2020
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work, Volume 17, pp 347-360; https://doi.org/10.1080/26408066.2020.1738301

Abstract:
Purpose: An understudied, but important, topic within the social work literature is the affective well-being of human service case managers. The groundbreaking demand-control (DC) model predicts additive effects for job demands and job control on job-related affective well-being. Meta-analytic data and comprehensive literature reviews report inconclusive findings for this classic additive model. Method: This two-sample cross-sectional field survey study sought to address both issues by testing a recently introduced modified additive model using 810 human service case managers from the state of New York. Results: Mediational analyzes (i.e., structural equation modelling and bootstrapping) confirmed goal-related feedback’s intervening role on the job control-wellbeing relationship for each sample. Discussion: Results not only contribute uniquely to the evidence-based social work literature, but also help clarify forty years of inconsistent classic additive model findings.
Andreas Reinhardt, Susanne Enke
Published: 3 April 2020
Employee Relations, Volume 42, pp 1135-1158; https://doi.org/10.1108/er-04-2019-0173

Abstract:
PurposeStudies on personal characteristics that influence managers' performance in their jobs and their ability to innovate focus mainly on for-profit organizations. We argue that non-profit organizations (NPOs) differ substantially from for-profit organizations in their organizational set-up and processes, so the skills they demand from their managers and employees also differ. We undertake this research to explore the personal factors that could be particularly relevant to managers' performance and innovativeness in the non-profit sector.Design/methodology/approachWe conduct a qualitative, model-building study to derive the personal factors that influence managers' intention to perform and to innovate and their behavior in that regard. The base of our analysis is 15 interviews with knowledgeable informants who either work in NPOs, provide services to them or perform research about them.FindingsWe derive 14 personal factors that can be aggregated into four categories—experience, virtues and vices, interpersonal skills and management skills—each of which affect NPO managers' individual performance and/or individual innovativeness.Originality/valueThis study adds to existing research on Ajzen's (1985) Theory of Planned Behavior by extending it to the nonprofit context, so it contributes to the literature on individuals' behavioral intentions.
Elizabeth A. Cooper, Aimee DuVall Phelps, Sean Edmund Rogers
Published: 4 March 2020
Employee Relations, Volume 42, pp 1055-1100; https://doi.org/10.1108/er-04-2019-0166

Abstract:
PurposeThis paper systematically reviews the past four years of research on human resource management (HRM) in nonprofit organizations (NPOs) to better understand: (1) recent theoretical and empirical developments and where scholarship in the field is headed (i.e. trends); (2) what topics and findings are especially important to understanding how the thought and practice of nonprofit HRM differs from that in public and for-profit organizations (i.e. insights); and (3) what gaps exist in current knowledge and scholarship and some real-world, practice-driven developments in people management that illuminate promising future research directions (i.e. opportunities).Design/methodology/approachSixty-seven peer-reviewed journal articles covering the period 2015–2018 were identified using a university library database search, as well as by-hand searches through every issue of 22 nonprofit and 36 human resources-related journals during the four-year period.FindingsThe findings highlight strong continued interest by scholars in a wide range of nonprofit HRM issues, coverage of these issues by a worldwide network of researchers who bring global perspectives and contexts to the study of nonprofit HRM, and rich theoretical and methodological diversity. Yet, compared with the universe of possible human resource topics and several leading-edge developments in organizations and societies that might affect the way people are managed in nonprofits, the paper uncovers gaps in the most recent knowledge base.Originality/valueThe paper creates a compilation of the most recent nonprofit human resource research to be used as a tool for scholars, students, and practitioners for many years to come.
Michael Jindra, Bowen Paulle, Ines W. Jindra
Published: 24 July 2019
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 49, pp 160-179; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764019861716

Abstract:
Among antipoverty nonprofit organizations (NPOs), a significant shift back to “relational work” has been occurring. This form of human services connotes strong bonds and durable engagement with clients on major life changes. Critics have associated such efforts with paternalistic and disciplinary regimes reinforcing broader neoliberal trends. Perhaps now, with mounting pressures toward (narrow) professionalization among nonprofits, these illuminating critiques can usefully be paired with investigations doing justice to relational work’s beneficial inner workings and effects. Informed by years of immersion in NPOs and insights from “late” Foucault—ironically the central theoretical influence among critics of relational work—we show how and why researchers might approach even problematic aspects of this form of social action as unavoidable elements capable of contributing to the alleviation of poverty. The conclusion argues for pragmatic and multifaceted approaches to the study and management of antipoverty nonprofits balancing both the precariousness and promise of relational work.
, , Barbara Romzek, Jocelyn Johnston
Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance, Volume 43, pp 188-204; https://doi.org/10.1080/23303131.2019.1637804

Abstract:
A central concern in networked service delivery is the potential loss of accountability as network actors may pursue singular organizational goals over collective network goals. Despite the critical role-played by frontline workers in implementing network policy goals, previous research has overlooked their influence on network accountability. How do frontline workers impact accountability in networked service delivery? Drawing on theories of informal accountability and street-level bureaucracy, we address this question through an empirical study of children’s service networks. We find professional norms and discretionary behavior exercised by frontline workers help to contribute to provider network’s informal accountability structure in important ways.
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