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(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764017721060)
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, Aarika Forney
Published: 6 July 2022
Journal: Public Integrity
Abstract:
This article serves as an introduction for public administration and public institutions about Asian Americans. The experiences of Asian Americans and the field of Asian American Studies can inform a more nuanced understanding of how racial categories are constructed and community-led efforts that lead to institutional change. Asian Americans offer important insights for public administration, including how to contend with intra- and intergroup differences, how racialization upholds white supremacy, and how to document community-based histories of activism and engagement with public institutions. We end with recommendations to rethink diversity and racial climate in the field. Through a more in-depth understanding of racial categories, public institutions can improve resource distribution and decision-making.
Published: 15 February 2022
by MDPI
Journal: Social Sciences
Social Sciences, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci11020077

Abstract:
The article addresses the involvement of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) assisting immigrants in policy advocacy (PA) connecting the perspectives of political science and social work. In a context in which many politicians and a major part of society opposes immigration, it examines how NGOs perceive their legitimacy and accountability concerning their attempts to influence policymaking. It also studies how the attitude of the society towards these NGOs affects their work. The analysis builds on the multimethod research combining qualitative and quantitative approaches carried out among Czech NGOs. Among the key findings is that, when talking about legitimacy, NGOs’ representatives refer mainly to themselves and their own vision of society. This is however a manifestation of internalized external legitimacy sources such as democratic principles and existing laws, together with experience and direct contact with clients, as well as moral obligations. As for accountability, despite many people identify these NGOs as irresponsible welcomers, in fact most of them feel accountable primarily to society (in particular its weakest parts), then to immigrants and finally to themselves. The negative attitude of the majority toward these NGOs clearly affects their PA activities, e.g., their access to authorities, the raised topics and applied tools or types of arguments.
Sarah A. Spruill, Abigail Laurenson, Lynn A. Warner,
Human Service Organizations: Management, Leadership & Governance pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/23303131.2021.1991070

Abstract:
This qualitative study addresses the experiences of paid professionals and volunteers who worked through nonprofit human service organizations to help people obtain health insurance in the first wave of open enrollment for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Focusing on the state of Alabama, we compare and contrast the experiences of ACA navigators in different settings: (1) established nonprofits that received federal contracts to provide navigation services, and (2) a new nonprofit started specifically to help people sign up for ACA coverage. Findings contribute to the policy implementation literature by illuminating how policy implementation in different nonprofit settings can result in varying experiences of personal and political transformation. Findings contribute to the policy feedback literature by illustrating the potential for policy feedback effects on frontline workers. The study also illustrates again that human services nonprofits can create organizational conditions to promote empathy, excitement, and dedication at the frontlines.
Maria Apolonia Calderon, Daniel E. Chand, Daniel P. Hawes
Published: 1 December 2020
Nonprofit Policy Forum, Volume 12, pp 285-310; https://doi.org/10.1515/npf-2020-0023

Abstract:
Nonprofit scholars have developed a rich literature on nonprofit advocacy. While the literature is rich, however, gaps remain in our collective knowledge, especially regarding specific sectors of nonprofit human service organizations. Here, we apply existing theory on advocacy by human service organizations to an important subset of the nonprofit community, that being immigrant-serving organizations (ISOs). Most prior research on nonprofit advocacy has not focused on politically polarized issues, such as contemporary immigration policy. Using a nationwide survey of ISOs, we find that unlike other types of human service organizations, the majority of ISOs do engage in at least some forms of policy advocacy. However, those that report using the H-election status on their Form 990s are significantly more likely to engage in advocacy and do so to a wide variety of policymakers, including legislators, chief executives, and even local law enforcement agencies. H-election groups are also more likely to perceive their advocacy activities as effective. These findings add to the evolving knowledge on when and how human service groups seek policy change for marginalized groups.
Kun Huang, , Beilei Yang, Shanshan Zou
Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, Volume 21, pp 535-555; https://doi.org/10.1080/13876988.2019.1609780

Abstract:
Third-party service providers often collaborate in both service delivery and administrative advocacy. Yet the linkage between such collaboration has been overlooked. The article studies how joint advocacy inside two government-funded service delivery networks are formed, based on the concepts of service provider clique overlap, multiplexity, and resource tangibility. Comparative network analysis of data from a mental health services network in the US and a community-based elderly care network in China showed consistent support for the linkage between service provider cliques and joint administrative advocacy. Theoretically, it advances the study of advocacy coalitions by highlighting the nuanced effects of service provider cliques on advocacy partnerships.
Jennifer E. Mosley, Meghan Jarpe
Published: 26 February 2019
Public administration review, Volume 79, pp 629-640; https://doi.org/10.1111/puar.13037

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, Pauline Hope Cheong
Published: 26 December 2018
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 48, pp 784-813; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764018819869

Abstract:
In light of the recent rise of Chinese nongovernmental organizations (NGO) and the significant roles that they are playing to advance nonprofit and voluntary activities, this article explores the network dynamics of emerging NGOs in China, known as NGO incubators. NGO incubators were birthed to provide services to civil society actors, including capacity-building training, fundraising, information support, and network formation guidance. This study examines the evolution of the organizational network of the largest Chinese NGO incubator over its 6-year formative period and provides fresh empirical evidence to illustrate how NGO incubators can powerfully bridge structural holes and build cross-sectoral alliance networks in a nascent civil society. Theoretical and practical implications for NGO development are discussed.
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