Refine Search

New Search

Results: 5

(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764017720769)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Published: 8 July 2022
Voluntary Sector Review, Volume -1, pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1332/204080521x16530854607157

Abstract:
How funding is distributed is an important question in philanthropy. But limited work has asked this question about philanthropy originating on the continent of Africa. This article explores the effective distribution of grants by a community-based South African non-profit organisation through the lens of transaction cost economics. Instead of needs-based indicators, this study finds that internet access is the main indicator of funding, with areas with lower internet access receiving fewer funds than those with higher internet access. This indicates that funding by community-based non-profits may not always be reaching the areas with the highest amount of need, but areas with lower search costs. Overall, community-based organisations may deal with issues similar to international organisations in reaching local non-profit organisations and disenfranchised communities. Targeted outreach, specifically to areas with lower access to the internet, can help to ameliorate these differences.
Published: 30 January 2020
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 49, pp 776-802; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764020901812

Abstract:
Local nongovernmental organizations (local NGOs) based in less economically advanced countries suffer from a “liability of foreignness” in attracting international funding: They are geographically, linguistically, and culturally distant from funders in more economically advanced countries. As a result, although U.S. foundations gave 27,572 grants to support programming occurring within less economically advanced countries between 2000 and 2012, only 10.4% went to local NGOs within those areas. We argue that while favoring NGOs in more economically advanced countries minimizes funder-NGO foreignness, or the distance between the foundation and the grantee NGO, it increases NGO-programming foreignness, or the distance between the grantee NGO and the site of their programming, creating crucial trade-offs. We draw upon organizational theory to predict under what conditions U.S. foundations would fund local NGOs, finding that local NGOs receive more support from older foundations and those with greater geographic and program area experience. Furthermore, local NGOs receive larger, longer grants but with lower probabilities of being renewed. These results identify the conditions under which foundations “go the extra mile” and fund local NGOs.
, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson,
Published: 17 July 2019
Public Management Review, Volume 22, pp 1443-1463; https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2019.1635192

Abstract:
Public policy increasingly relies upon private philanthropic actors to meet community needs. However, nonprofits located in communities of colour may be disadvantaged in the private grants marketplace. This article examines the complex relationship between grantee location in a community of colour, board networks and the size of grants in public foundations in two metropolitan communities. Larger and better-connected networks are associated with larger grants; however, nonprofits located in communities of colour have smaller and less well-connected networks. These findings confirm the importance of network connections in the grant-making process and raise important questions for future research.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top