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(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764097264007)
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Published: 23 August 2021
Journal: Sport in Society
Abstract:
This paper examines the role of sports practice in the re-articulation process of immigrant communities in their places of destination. I will use the case of basketball tournaments held by immigrants from Oaxaca, Mexico, in the context of the Los Angeles metropolitan region. This Mexican emigration has settled mainly in southern California, in the United States. While the eventual creation of their immigrant communities is explained by the insertion of immigrants in specific labor niches through their social networks, mainly based on sharing the same hometowns of origin, the role of socio-cultural elements such as sports practice and the formation of immigrant public spaces are also significant factors that make possible this process. The examination of these sports practices reveals its centrality in the conformation of these public spaces and with it the development of identification processes that enables the consolidation of immigrant communities.
Published: 3 July 2019
Journal of Civil Society, Volume 15, pp 214-229; https://doi.org/10.1080/17448689.2019.1622310

Abstract:
The concept of migration and development (M&D) and practices in that area have lain on many countries’ political agendas for decades, with no clear focus or coherent strategy knitting together the various stakeholders working in the sphere. This article analyzes the main conceptions of M&D in the discourses and practices of Spanish NGOs and compares them with the focuses that have arisen in the academic sphere, for a look into primarily five issues: whether NGOs have their own focus on the migration-development nexus or are swayed by public institutions’ guidelines; whether NGOs steer their actions more toward preventing and restricting migration or toward promoting development; whether NGOs also consider potential effects on development in receiving countries; whether NGOs entertain the idea of participatory actions where immigrant persons hold centre stage; and whether NGOs fulfil their civic and political function as a propounding force to contribute to democratic governance in migration matters.
Published: 20 June 2018
Journal: Public health
Public health, Volume 162, pp 16-24; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2018.05.010

Abstract:
Togo is experiencing a growing phenomenon of migration and consequently receives remittances from international migrants back to their relatives. Remittances represent about 9.4% of the gross domestic product (GDP), placing Togo in the top 10 recipients of remittances in the world in 2014. Despite the importance of remittances, information on their health outcomes is inadequate, particularly if remittances have a positive impact on the utilisation of maternal and child health services. The aim of this article is to evaluate the impacts of migration on maternal and child health services utilisation. Cross-sectional data analysis of mothers aged 15–49 years who have recently given birth. We used propensity score matching to compare the utilisation of health services by mothers and children from households with migrants to those without migrants. We simulated a potential confounder to assess the robustness of the effects of the estimated treatment (i.e. migration). We also addressed the problem of hidden biases with the bounding approach. Deliveries attended by skilled health personnel were found to be 10.3% higher in migrant households than in households without migrants. The antenatal visits of mothers in migrant households were 3.5%–9.5% higher than those of matched control groups. Compared to the non-migrant households, the migrant households had a positive welfare (postnatal checks at the hospital) impact of 11.9%–12.5% percentage points. Furthermore, through access to health insurance, mothers in migrant families enjoy more financial protection with regard to delivery, prenatal and postnatal care. We also found that children in migrant households benefit from more preventive health inputs such as postnatal checks and vaccinations. Our results suggest that migration contributes greatly to improving births at hospitals, skilled birth assistance, and utilisation of antenatal and postnatal care through the return flow of financial resources. Efforts in health care reforms in Togo should take into account the scope of the positive impacts of migration on the utilisation of maternal and child health services.
Published: 21 August 2015
Comparative Political Studies, Volume 49, pp 78-114; https://doi.org/10.1177/0010414015600468

Abstract:
What explains varying levels of emigrant transnational engagement in home-country politics? The well-known difficulties in obtaining migrant profile data and restriction to a few destination countries have resulted in a lack of systematic empirical investigation of this question. We expand nascent efforts to fill this gap by offering a new theoretical framework and novel research design that stress the potential importance of destination characteristics. We argue that the experience and environment in emigration are critical factors for emigrants’ engagement with two major types of homeland-related political activities: electoral and community. Using Ukraine as a case of an average migrant-producer developing country and using count models on original survey data on Ukrainian extraterritorial voters in a diverse set of 15 countries, we show that assimilation, emigrant networks, and destination characteristics are consistently strong predictors of transnational political engagement among the emigrants who show at least a minimal concern for homeland politics.
, Gery Nijenhuis
Published: 21 May 2015
Population, Space and Place, Volume 22, pp 336-342; https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.1944

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 September 2013
International Migration Review, Volume 47, pp 730-772; https://doi.org/10.1111/imre.12041

Abstract:
This article considers the geographic distribution of nonprofit organizations serving immigrants across municipalities within the Greater Boston area in an effort to identify variations in the levels of assistance available to major foreign-born populations in the region. The analysis relies on data from the Census and the National Center for Charitable Statistics. Results suggest that geographic context matters, including immigrant settlement patterns, racial heterogeneity, and fiscal and institutional characteristics of towns and cities, in shaping availability of nonprofit resources to immigrants. These findings highlight large socio-spatial disparities in immigrant services and challenge the wisdom of devolving responsibility for such assistance to local governments and ultimately nonprofits, as new entrants settle in larger numbers in areas previously unaffected by immigration and ill-prepared to address immigrant needs. The research contributes to debates on the rescaling of immigrant policy and service provision and literature on the geography of integration by engaging with scholarship in urban and political geography.
, Luis Escala Rabadán
Published: 26 March 2013
International Review of Sociology, Volume 23, pp 161-179; https://doi.org/10.1080/03906701.2013.771044

Abstract:
In many developing countries, migrants play an important role by supporting their local communities in their places of origin. An extensive literature has made visible their contribution to local development, thus revealing their involvement in the provision of social services or the construction of infrastructures. In this paper we illustrate the extent and scope of this task and the types of actions that migrants have started up in different countries of the world in general, and the cases of Morocco and Mexico in particular, to examine the achievements and limitations of both states' policies and migrants' associations in regard to their involvement in local development initiatives.
Enrique S. Pumar
Published: 1 January 2012
Research in Race and Ethnic Relations pp 25-43; https://doi.org/10.1108/s0195-7449(2012)0000017005

Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible relationship between conditions of national development, as measured by human development indicators (HDIs), and the segmented assimilation of Hispanics in Washington, DC. Methodology/approach – To discuss the association between these two variables, I identified five indicators of assimilation discussed in the literature and matched them against the United Nations Development Program's (UNDP) ranking of nations according to their HDI composite index. In addition, I selected eight Hispanic groups’ representatives of the three tiers by which nations are ranked in the Human Development Report published by the UNDP. Findings – My results show that conditions of national development impact immigrant assimilation, at least in the first generation. Research limitations/implications – Due to the sample size and the peculiar conditions of Washington, DC, the findings presented require further testing. Originality/value of paper – Despite these limitations, the findings make a significant contribution to the migration literature by taking into account how stock of knowledge contributes to the different rates of assimilation among immigrants with shared ethnicity.
Michèle Vatz Laaroussi, Claudio Bolzman
Published: 1 January 2010
Lien social et Politiques pp 7-25; https://doi.org/10.7202/1001396ar

Published: 2 January 2009
Sociální studia / Social Studies, Volume 6, pp 11-47; https://doi.org/10.5817/soc2009-1-11

Abstract:
Metodologický nacionalismus je chápán jako předpoklad, že národ/stát/společnost je přirozenou sociální a politickou formou moderního světa. Nejprve rozlišujeme tři druhy metodologického nacionalismu příznačné pro hlavní proud sociální vědy a poté ukazujeme, jak ovlivnily výzkum migrace. Odkrýváme paralely mezi nacionalistickým myšlením a konceptualizací migrace v poválečných společenských vědách. V historickém tour d’horizon ukazujeme, že tato koncepce hlavního proudu se rozvinula v úzké interakci s procesy budování západních národních států a s rolí, již v nich sehrály imigrační a integrační politiky. Posun směrem k výzkumu „trasnacionálních komunit“, což je poslední fáze tohoto procesu, vyplynul spíše z epistemického opuštění metodologického nacionalismu než ze vzniku nových předmětů pozorování. V závěru článku doporučujeme nové analytické koncepty, které nejsou zabarvené metodologickým nacionalismem a současně překračují fluidismus značné části současné sociální teorie.
Enrico A. Marcelli, B. Lindsay Lowell
Published: 1 March 2005
International Migration Review, Volume 39, pp 69-102; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2005.tb00256.x

Abstract:
Annual U.S.-Mexico pecuniary remittances are estimated to have more than doubled recently to at least $10 billion – augmenting interest among policymakers, financial institutions, and transnational migrant communities concerning how relatively poor expatriate Mexicans sustain such large transfers and the impact on immigrant integration in the United States. We employ the 2001 Los Angeles County Mexican Immigrant Residency Status Survey (LAC-MIRSS) to investigate how individual characteristics and social capital traditionally associated with integration, neighborhood context, and various investments in the United States influenced remitting in 2000. Remitting is estimated to have been inversely related to conventional integration metrics and influenced by community context in both sending and receiving areas. Contrary to straight-line assimilation theories and more consistent with a transnational or nonlinear perspective, however, remittances are also estimated to have been positively related to immigrant homeownership in Los Angeles County and negatively associated with having had public health insurance such as Medicaid.
Thomas Y. Owusu
Journal of International Migration and Integration, Volume 4, pp 395-413; https://doi.org/10.1007/s12134-003-1027-x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Luis Eduardo Guarnizo
Published: 1 September 2003
International Migration Review, Volume 37, pp 666-699; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2003.tb00154.x

Abstract:
Migrants’ long-distance economic relations with their homelands have been the subject of an extensive, albeit fragmented, multidisciplinary inquiry. Most existing studies have been primarily concerned with the north-south flow of monetary remittances that migrants send to their homelands. Using a transnational perspective informed by economic sociology tenets, this article argues that this north-south, monetary-centered approach is too limited, for it fails to heed the multiple macroeconomic effects of migrants’ transnational economic and noneconomic connections and, thus, underestimates migrants’ agency and their influence at the global level. Using the concept of transnational living, the study presents new vistas of transnational migration that question accepted notions about the relationship between labor mobility and capital mobility.
Andreas Wimmer, Nina Glick Schiller
Published: 1 September 2003
International Migration Review, Volume 37, pp 576-610; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2003.tb00151.x

Abstract:
The article examines methodological nationalism, a conceptual tendency that was central to the development of the social sciences and undermined more than a century of migration studies. Methodological nationalism is the naturalization of the global regime of nation-states by the social sciences. Transnational studies, we argue, including the study of transnational migration, is linked to periods of intense globalization such as the turn of the twenty-first century. Yet transnational studies have their own contradictions that may reintroduce methodological nationalism in other guises. In studying migration, the challenge is to avoid both extreme fluidism and the bounds of nationalist thought.
Robert C. Smith
Published: 1 September 2003
International Migration Review, Volume 37, pp 724-759; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2003.tb00156.x

Abstract:
This article compares the evolution of diaspora-sending state relations for Mexico, Italy, and more briefly, Poland during their peak periods of out migration. I argue that sending-state diaspora relations evolve through the state's changing relations with the global system, their domestic politics, and migrants’ ability to act politically with respect to the homeland. This research shows the state helping to create diasporic or transnational space. It also contributes to the analytical work of fleshing out examples of transnational life in history, and examines a case (the Polish one) where the global system and other conditions combine to overwhelm transnational life.
Published: 1 June 2003
International Migration Review, Volume 37, pp 297-343; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2003.tb00140.x

Abstract:
How should we conceptualize membership, citizenship and political community in a world where migrants and their home states increasingly maintain and cultivate their formal and informal ties? This study analyzes the extra-territorial conduct of Mexican politics and the emergence of new migrant membership practices and relations between migrants and home states. Standard globalist, transnationalist or citizenship theories cannot properly contextualize and analyze such practices. I propose that we rethink the concept of membership in a political community not only as a Marshallian status granted by states, but also as an instituted process embedded within four other institutions and processes: home state domestic politics; the home state's relationship to the world system; a semi-autonomous transnational civil society created in part by migration; and the context of reception of migrants in the United States. A main conclusion is that the state itself plays a key role in creating transnational political action by migrants and new migrant membership practices. The article draws on printed sources and interviews and ethnography done since 1990.
José Itzigsohn,
Published: 1 September 2002
International Migration Review, Volume 36, pp 766-798; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1747-7379.2002.tb00104.x

Abstract:
This article analyzes sociocultural transnational linkages among Colombian, Dominican, and Salvadoran immigrants in the United States. It emphasizes the importance of comparative analysis and yields three main findings. First, participation in any particular transnational activity is low, but participation over all the different forms of transnational practices is extended. Second, the process of incorporation does not weaken transnational participation. Third, there is more than one causal path that can account for the rise of transnational sociocultural practices. The different paths can be explained by reference to the context of reception and the mode of incorporation of each group.
Manuel Orozco
Latin American politics and society, Volume 44, pp 41-66; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-2456.2002.tb00205.x

Abstract:
Taking as its point of departure the relationship between migration and globalization, this article highlights the salience of remittances in the national economies of Latin America, especially Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. It looks at the various actors that participate in the transfer of remittances and suggests that incorporating migrant labor dynamics as a category of economic integration will reveal a distinct landscape in the economies of Latin America.
Nina Glick Schiller, Georges Eugene Fouron
Published: 1 January 2001
Published: 1 January 2001
Journal: Identities
Identities, Volume 7, pp 583-619; https://doi.org/10.1080/1070289x.2001.9962679

Abstract:
In transnational contexts, and particularly in situations where people have physically migrated across international borders and may be separated by other barriers as well, communication cannot be presumed and should be problematized. To date, however, research focusing on transnational migration has emphasized the kinds of ties people maintain despite corporal separation, such as negotiating transnational households and community associations and conducting business ventures and political movements. How people accomplish these tasks across borders has been less developed in the literature, although authors do acknowledge that modern telecommunications technologies have facilitated communication, particularly in comparison to the tools available to earlier generations of migrants. In contrast, this paper focuses on the ways migrants from a very rural area of El Salvador communicate across borders, identifying the roles that gender and power play, with particular attention to the dynamics between spouses.
Published: 1 January 2001
Journal: Identities
Identities, Volume 7, pp 501-537; https://doi.org/10.1080/1070289x.2001.9962677

Abstract:
This paper proposes an approach for analyzing the gender and geography of citizenship practices in transnational social spaces in order to contribute to theorizing on state‐transmigrant relations and citizenship. Drawing on feminist scholarship on citizenship, I conceptualize citizenship as including formal rights and substantive citizenship practices that are exercised in relation to different levels of political authority, and in different geographic sites within transnational spaces. The approach is used to examine dynamics between Mexican state policies and programs and transmigrant organizations in Los Angeles. Using data from research on migration between Zacatecas and California, I argue that men find a privileged arena of action in transmigrant organizations and Mexican state‐mediated transnational social spaces, which become spaces for practicing forms of citizenship that enhance their social and gender status. Women are excluded from active citizenship in this arena, but often practice substantive social citizenship in the United States.
José Itzigsohn
Published: 1 December 2000
International Migration Review, Volume 34, pp 1126-1154; https://doi.org/10.1177/019791830003400403

Abstract:
This article analyzes the emergence and the institutional structure of contemporary immigrants’ transnational politics. It poses three questions: 1) How is transnational politics structured? 2) How can we explain the current emergence of transnational political linkages? 3) Who participates and who benefits from political transnationalism. The article focuses on the cases of the Dominican Republic, Haiti and El Salvador and argues that they share an institutional pattern of transnational politics in which there are three main actors: the state apparatus of the country of origin; the political parties of the country of origin; and migrant organizations in the country of reception. The article links the rise of this pattern of transnational politics to the need of the states of origin to guarantee the flow of remittances, the organization of immigrants in the country of reception, and the consolidation of competitive politics in democratic regimes. Although the analysis is based on the experiences of Latin American and Caribbean countries and their emigrants in the United States, the article argues that this institutional pattern may transcend this particular region.
Published: 1 June 2000
Journal: Identities
Identities, Volume 7, pp 197-232; https://doi.org/10.1080/1070289x.2000.9962665

Abstract:
This article explores the relationship between states and transnational movements of people through the trope of diplomacy. A standard definition of diplomacy is the conduct of negotiations between nations. From the normative perspective, international migration lies within the jurisdiction of diplomacy—often precipitating diplomatic crises—but is not usually viewed as constitutive of diplomatic relations. Likewise, such migration is widely acknowledged as structured by colonial and neocolonial ties but is not often construed to structure, produce, or reproduce these ties. Lastly, diplomacy is generally seen as the domain of state agents or diplomats. What about non‐state actors such as migrants and even tourists? Can they also be agents in the construction and exercise of international relations? I will argue that transnational actors actually construct and affect the relationships between states, but that these relations have not been developed fully.
Peter H. Schuck
Published: 1 January 2000
SSRN Electronic Journal; https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.191409

Abstract:
This paper first discusses how law affects migration flows by helping to construct the incentives that drive the decisions of potential migrants. It then turns
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