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(searched for: doi:10.1177/08997640972640071)
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, Jiawei Sophia Fu, Katherine R. Cooper
Published: 7 April 2018
Journal of Business Ethics, Volume 150, pp 385-399; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-018-3856-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Katherine R. Cooper, Andrew Pilny, Macarena Pena‐Y‐Lillo
Published: 27 July 2017
Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 28, pp 155-174; https://doi.org/10.1002/nml.21276

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, Rebecca Nesbit
Published: 21 September 2012
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 42, pp 603-621; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764012459255

Abstract:
In this study, the authors explore how the dynamics associated with the founding of new nonprofit organizations, the characteristics of the founders, and the developmental life cycles of nonprofit organizations contribute to the seemingly fragmented landscape of the nonprofit sector. Based on data collected from interviews with 31 nonprofit organizations, we find that new nonprofits are being created by passionate, entrepreneurial individuals who hope to make a difference in the community. Although these organizations are typically small, with few staff members and small budgets, the extent to which they rely on volunteers and are connected to the broader community varies considerably. Moreover, many founders had little experience volunteering or working in the sector. The findings from this study have important implications for the professional development of nonprofit staff, leaders, and volunteers, and they shed new light on how we think about and describe the founders of nonprofit organizations.
Published: 26 July 2012
Administration & Society, Volume 45, pp 974-1004; https://doi.org/10.1177/0095399712451887

Abstract:
The article presents a framework of nonprofit human resource management (NHRM) that emphasizes the context of nonprofits, organizational and employee characteristics. Drawing on contingency theory and social exchange theory, the article examines the multidimensional contingencies in the environment of nonprofit organizations and the characteristics of employees that underlie NHRM. Three underlying principles and five models of NHRM are presented to explain the dimensions of NHRM. The concept of social alignment, implications for nonprofit management research, and practice are discussed.
VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, Volume 24, pp 214-240; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-012-9286-9

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Leda McIntyre Hall
Published: 12 September 2007
Critical Sociology, Volume 33, pp 913-936; https://doi.org/10.1163/156916307x230377

Abstract:
This study examines a group of small, religious, nonprofit organizations whose single common thread is funding from the Campaign for Human Development of the National Conference of Catholic Bishops. Hypotheses are made about the relationships between organizational goals, competition between groups, and linkages with other groups. The degree of interaction with other groups and the types of actions used to attain goals varies between religious and more secular nonprofit groups.
Margaret Harris, Romayne Hutchison, Ben Cairns
Published: 1 March 2005
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 34, pp 88-109; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764004269305

Abstract:
The context for this article is the public policy interest in the United States and the United Kingdom in the contribution that faith-based organizations can make to the provision of welfare and other public services, and the corresponding demands on such organizations to consider how they plan and deliver services. The authors present findings from a major research program that aimed to facilitate the planning of service provision within one faith group, theU.K.Jewishcommunity.Theauthorsoutlinetheopportunitiesandobstacles found to be facing this “Jewish voluntary sector” and then discuss the lessons to be drawn from this kind of community-wide approach to the planning of services within and across a faith group in the current public policy climate. Specifically, the authors look at implications for planning in the U.K. Jewish community and other faith groups, for the research agenda on faith-based organizations, and for public and social policy.
John B. Duncan, Morris H. Stocks
Published: 5 December 2003
Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 14, pp 213-225; https://doi.org/10.1002/nml.30

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Thomas C. Wooten, John W. Coker, Robert C. Elmore
Published: 15 July 2003
Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Volume 13, pp 343-365; https://doi.org/10.1002/nml.4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Sarah Wilson, Thomas H. Pollak, Patrick Michael Rooney
Published: 30 June 2003
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 32, pp 252-267; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764003032002005

Abstract:
The failure of a substantial portion of mail survey recipients to respond to invitations to participate in research projects raises issues of nonresponse error. Because this error is difficult to quantify, survey researchers seek high rates of return to signal legitimacy and reduce questions regarding nonresponse bias. Research on survey method indicates that the design of the survey research process has a measurable influence on the rate of survey returns. This article focuses on three aspects of research design that are expected to influence mail survey returns in surveys of nonprofit organizations: questionnaire complexity, use of Federal Express versus standard mail, and the use of monetary incentives. Using an experimental design, the research concludes that questionnaire complexity and the use of monetary incentives generate no difference in returns, whereas the use of Federal Express to deliver the survey to nonprofit executives has a measurable positive effect.
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