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(searched for: doi:10.1075/prag.27.3.04zou)
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Andriana Boudouraki, Stuart Reeves, Joel E Fischer, Sean Rintel
CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems; https://doi.org/10.1145/3491102.3517640

Abstract:
Mobile Robotic Telepresence (MRP) systems are remotely controlled, mobile videoconferencing devices that allow the remote user to move independently and have a physical presence in the environment. This paper presents a longitudinal study of MRP use in the home, where the first author used an MRP to connect with family, her partner, and friends over a six-month period. Taking an ethnomethodological approach, we present video recorded fragments to explore the phenomenon of ‘visiting’ where MRP users drop into the home for a period of time. We unpack the more ‘procedural’ elements—arriving and departing—alongside ways of ‘dwelling’ together during a visit, and the qualities of mobility, autonomous presence and spontaneity that emerge.
Published: 1 November 2021
Cognitive Semiotics, Volume 14, pp 131-161; https://doi.org/10.1515/cogsem-2021-2041

Abstract:
The article introduces hyperembodiment as a general feature of artefacts for perception and representation and as a research agenda for cognitive semiotics and cognitive science at large. At the heart of the article, I offer analyses of two different selected examples: Hyperembodiment in a Facetime conversation and in a Snapchat message. These digital productions of appearances of social interactants are analysed with particular attention to their intercorporeal qualities and it is argued that social perception is facilitated which takes the users of visual, interpersonal communication devices beyond the corporeal limits of ordinary ways of being present for each other. Broadening the scope, I then discuss how a general focus on hyperembodiment opens new, productive avenues of inquiry. First, I relate hyperembodiment to the heterogenous field of social presence research and suggest how it may contribute to it. Thereafter I discuss hyperembodiment as a topic of cognitive semiotics.
, Mirka Rauniomaa,
Published: 4 June 2021
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.661784

Abstract:
The article explores how social interaction is accomplished through intertwined verbal and bodily conduct, focusing on directive actions that include a second-person imperative form of the Finnish verb katsoa “to look,” typically kato. The study draws on video recordings of various outdoor activities in nature, mostly from family interaction with small children, and employs interactional linguistics and conversation analysis as its analytic framework. The directive kato actions in focus are produced (1) as noticings, to initiate a new course of action by directing the recipient to look at and possibly talk about a target that the speaker treats as newsworthy; (2) as showings, to initiate an evaluative course of action by directing the recipient to look at and align with the speaker’s stance toward the target; or (3) as prompts, to contribute to an ongoing course of action by directing the recipient to do something relevant to or with the target. Apart from the use of kato, the actions differ in their design. In noticings, the target is typically named verbally and pointed at through embodied means, but the participants remain at some distance from it (e.g., kato muurahaispesä tuossa “look an anthill there”). In showings, the participant producing the action typically approaches the recipient with the target in hand, so that the naming of the target is not necessary but, by evaluating the target themselves, the shower explicates how the target should be seen (e.g., kato kuinka jättejä “look how giant {ones}”). In prompts, neither the target nor the intended action is named, but the target is typically indicated by embodied means, for example, by the participants’ approaching and pointing at it, and the intended action is inferable from the participants’ prior conduct (e.g., kato tuossa “look there” and pointing at a berry in the participants’ vicinity when berry picking has been established as relevant). By examining these three grammar-body assemblages, the article uncovers regularities in the co-occurrence of multiple modalities and contributes to new understandings of language use in its natural ecology – in co-present social interaction.
, Deborah Cameron, , , Shanti Vijayaraghavan, Satyajit Bhattacharya, , Joanne Morris,
Published: 31 July 2018
JMIR Research Protocols, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.2196/10913

Abstract:
Remote videoconsulting is promoted by policy makers as a way of delivering health care efficiently to an aging population with rising rates of chronic illness. As a radically new service model, it brings operational and interactional challenges in using digital technologies. In-depth research on this dynamic is needed before remote consultations are introduced more widely. The objective of this study will be to identify and analyze the communication strategies through which remote consultations are accomplished and to guide patients and clinicians to improve the communicative quality of remote consultations. In previous research, we collected and analyzed two separate datasets of remote consultations in a National Institute for Health Research-funded study of clinics in East London using Skype and a Wellcome Trust-funded study of specialist community heart failure teams in Oxford using Skype or FaceTime. The Qualitative Analysis of Remote Consultations (QuARC) study will combine datasets and undertake detailed interactional microanalysis of up to 40 remote consultations undertaken by senior and junior doctors and nurse specialists, including consultations with adults with diabetes, women who have diabetes during pregnancy, people consulting for postoperative cancer surgery and community-based patients having routine heart failure reviews along with up to 25 comparable face-to-face consultations. Drawing on established techniques (eg, conversation analysis), analysis will examine the contextual features in remote consultations (eg, restricted visual field) combined with close analysis of different modes of communication (eg, speech, gesture, and gaze). Our findings will address the current gap in knowledge about how technology shapes the fine detail of communication in remote consultations. Alongside academic outputs, findings will inform the coproduction of information and guidance about communication strategies to support successful remote consultations. Identifying the communication strategies through which remote consultations are accomplished and producing guidance for patients and clinicians about how to use this kind of technology successfully in consultations is an important and timely goal because roll out of remote consultations is planned across the National Health Service. RR1-10.2196/10913.
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