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(searched for: doi:10.1075/idj.23.1.11noe)
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Published: 2 October 2021
by MDPI
Journal: Applied Sciences
Applied Sciences, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11199188

Abstract:
Healthcare data has economic value and is evaluated as such. Therefore, it attracted global attention from observational and clinical studies alike. Recently, the importance of data quality research emerged in healthcare data research. Various studies are being conducted on this topic. In this study, we propose a DQ4HEALTH model that can be applied to healthcare when reviewing existing data quality literature. The model includes 5 dimensions and 415 validation rules. The four evaluation indicators include the net pass rate (NPR), weighted pass rate (WPR), net dimensional pass rate (NDPR), and weighted dimensional pass rate (WDPR). They were used to evaluate the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership Common Data Model (OMOP CDM) at three medical institutions. These indicators identify differences in data quality between the institutions. The NPRs of the three institutions (A, B, and C) were 96.58%, 90.08%, and 90.87%, respectively, and the WPR was 98.52%, 94.26%, and 94.81%, respectively. In the quality evaluation of the dimensions, the consistency was 70.06% of the total error data. The WDPRs were 98.22%, 94.74%, and 95.05% for institutions A, B, and C, respectively. This study presented indices for comparing quality evaluation models and quality in the healthcare field. Using these indices, medical institutions can evaluate the quality of their data and suggest practical directions for decreasing errors.
, Manjula Halai, Rachel Warner, Josefina Bravo
Identifying information and tenor in texts, Volume 26, pp 17-32; https://doi.org/10.1075/idj.20023.wal

Abstract:
Health-related information design has made a difference to people’s lives through clear explanation of procedures, processes, disease prevention and maintenance. This paper provides an example of user-centered design being applied to engage people with the prevention of drug-resistant infection. In particular, we focus on antibiotic resistance in the specific location of a community pharmacy in Rwanda. We describe an information campaign, Beat Bad Microbes, and summarize the challenges and opportunities of working in Rwanda on a cross-disciplinary project in which design research and practice are closely integrated.
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