Refine Search

New Search

Results: 13

(searched for: doi:10.1075/prag.27.3.03lic)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Federica D’Antoni,
Research on Language and Social Interaction, Volume 55, pp 79-100; https://doi.org/10.1080/08351813.2022.2026167

Abstract:
This article explores the embodied and linguistic practices by which visitors and staff members of cafés display recognition of and mutual familiarity with each other. Based on video data collected in two Italian cafés, we use conversation analysis to examine two sequential positions where displays of familiarity are salient, i.e., the initial moments of the encounter and the placement of the order. We demonstrate that individuals rely on reciprocal visual perception, embodied and vocal resources, in particular greetings, to display their service-related recognition and acquaintanceship. We identify three ways in which a café service between “frequently attending visitors” and “usual staff members” can be initiated: (a) the customer places an order (in a sequentially delayed position), (b) the barista articulates a “candidate order,” (c) no vocal order is articulated by either party. We show that these practices crucially rely on the knowledge the “recurrent parties” share of each other. Data are in Italian and Friulian.
Published: 26 October 2021
Probation Journal, Volume 68, pp 426-443; https://doi.org/10.1177/02645505211050867

Abstract:
The Exceptional Delivery Model for probation practice in England and Wales meant that probation practitioners predominantly worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, engaging and supervising service-users remotely. This article explores the impact of the Exceptional Delivery Model on staff and their practice. We begin by considering how probation practice changed because of the implementation of the Exceptional Delivery Model and the impact that this has had on probation staff. The reality of probation work is brought into perspective when there are children in the home and the demarcation of work and home life is easily blurred, especially when considered through the lens of ‘emotional dirty work’. We then present analysis of interviews with 61 practitioners and managers in the National Probation Service. The interviews were primarily focused on staff wellbeing and emotional labour as opposed to the impact of the pandemic, but participants regularly raised the pandemic in discussions. We focus on three key themes: the challenges of working from home and remote communication, experiences of managing risk through doorstep visits and the spill over of probation work into personal lives. The article concludes by considering what the findings tell us about probation work and potential future implications.
, David Giles, Wyke J. P. Stommel
Published: 4 May 2021
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 20 April 2021
Multimodal Communication, Volume 10, pp 143-156; https://doi.org/10.1515/mc-2020-0010

Abstract:
This paper examines the use of video chat (VC) with a focus on expectations and construction of attention. It is based on micro analyses of recorded VC sessions (gathered between 2013 and 2015) and thematic analysis of 29 semi-structured interviews about VC practices (conducted in 2014 and 2015). Building on multimodal (inter)action analysis (Norris, S. (2004). Analysing multimodal interaction: a methdological framework. Routledge, Norris, S. (2016). Concepts in multimodal discourse analysis with examples from video conferencing. Yearbook of the Poznan Linguistic Meeting 2: 141–165) and key concepts from nexus analysis (Scollon, R. and Scollon, S.W. (2004). Nexus Analysis: Discourse and the emerging internet. Routledge), I examine how focused attention is constructed in VCs and how these practices are shaped by experiences with other forms of communication. I demonstrate that unlike other forms of distance communication, typical VC encounters require a full investment of attention. This can be formulated as an interactional maxim: focus your attention on the VC interaction. I discuss how other activities can be interwoven with a VC and examine the exceptional practice of lapsed VC encounters (previously open connections or always-on video). I argue that participants display an orientation towards the maxim when pursuing other courses of action, and that lapsed encounters operate under a different value system than typical focused VC encounters. Finally, I reason that VC is reserved for close relationships because of the required investment of attention.
Published: 3 April 2021
Classroom Discourse, Volume 12, pp 121-145; https://doi.org/10.1080/19463014.2020.1808496

Abstract:
Videoconferencing is increasingly used in education as a way to support distance learning. This article contributes to the emerging interactional literature on video-mediated educational interaction by exploring how a telepresence robot is used to facilitate remote participation in university-level foreign language teaching. A telepresence robot differs from commonly used videoconferencing set-ups in that it allows mobility and remote camera control. A remote student can thus move a classroom-based robot from a distance in order to shift attention between people, objects and environmental structures during classroom activities. Using multimodal conversation analysis, we focus on how participants manage telepresent remote students’ visual access to classroom learning materials. In particular, we show how visibility checks are accomplished as a sequential and embodied practice in interaction between physically dispersed participants. Moreover, we demonstrate how participants conduct interactional work to make learning materials visible to the remote student by showing them and guiding the ‘seeing’ of materials. The findings portray some ways in which participants in video-mediated interaction display sensitivity to the possibility of intersubjective trouble and the recipient’s visual perspective. Besides increasing understanding of visual and interactional practices in technology-rich learning environments, the findings can be applied in the pedagogical design of such environments.
, Christian Greiffenhagen, Christian Licoppe
Published: 13 October 2020
Journal of Pragmatics, Volume 170, pp 364-380; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2020.09.022

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 20 February 2020
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume 22; https://doi.org/10.2196/16694

Abstract:
Background Video consultations are increasingly seen as a possible replacement for face-to-face consultations. Direct physical examination of the patient is impossible; however, a limited examination may be undertaken via video (eg, using visual signals or asking a patient to press their lower legs and assess fluid retention). Little is currently known about what such video examinations involve. Objective This study aimed to explore the opportunities and challenges of remote physical examination of patients with heart failure using video-mediated communication technology. Methods We conducted a microanalysis of video examinations using conversation analysis (CA), an established approach for studying the details of communication and interaction. In all, seven video consultations (using FaceTime) between patients with heart failure and their community-based specialist nurses were video recorded with consent. We used CA to identify the challenges of remote physical examination over video and the verbal and nonverbal communication strategies used to address them. Results Apart from a general visual overview, remote physical examination in patients with heart failure was restricted to assessing fluid retention (by the patient or relative feeling for leg edema), blood pressure with pulse rate and rhythm (using a self-inflating blood pressure monitor incorporating an irregular heartbeat indicator and put on by the patient or relative), and oxygen saturation (using a finger clip device). In all seven cases, one or more of these examinations were accomplished via video, generating accurate biometric data for assessment by the clinician. However, video examinations proved challenging for all involved. Participants (patients, clinicians, and, sometimes, relatives) needed to collaboratively negotiate three recurrent challenges: (1) adequate design of instructions to guide video examinations (with nurses required to explain tasks using lay language and to check instructions were followed), (2) accommodation of the patient’s desire for autonomy (on the part of nurses and relatives) in light of opportunities for involvement in their own physical assessment, and (3) doing the physical examination while simultaneously making it visible to the nurse (with patients and relatives needing adequate technological knowledge to operate a device and make the examination visible to the nurse as well as basic biomedical knowledge to follow nurses’ instructions). Nurses remained responsible for making a clinical judgment of the adequacy of the examination and the trustworthiness of the data. In sum, despite significant challenges, selected participants in heart failure consultations managed to successfully complete video examinations. Conclusions Video examinations are possible in the context of heart failure services. However, they are limited, time consuming, and challenging for all involved. Guidance and training are needed to support rollout of this new service model, along with research to understand if the challenges identified are relevant to different patients and conditions and how they can be successfully negotiated.
Wyke Stommel, Harry Van Goor, Martijn Stommel
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication; https://doi.org/10.1093/jcmc/zmz015

Abstract:
For patients recovering from surgery, a video consultation is a suitable alternative to conventional consultations. Video consultations have been found to be beneficial, but little is known about their organization, compared to face-to-face consultations. In this article, we explore potential extra interactional work conducted by participants in video-mediated consultations. We focus on the beginning of the consultation. Our data consist of 39 recorded, postoperative, oncological consultations, both face-to-face and through video-mediated communication (VMC), which we analyzed using conversation analysis. Although surgeons commonly launched the beginning with an announcement of the pathology report as the reason for the consultation, we found that in VMC, “how are you?” was regularly inserted after the testing of the technology. The question is a suitable strategy, as it displays overt other-attentiveness, while also being medically relevant. However, subsequently, surgeons may unilaterally close the elicited self-report to then address the pathology report. Thus, the “extra interactional work” of other-attentiveness is again attenuated.
Published: 15 October 2019
Abstract:
BACKGROUND Video consultations are increasingly seen as a possible replacement for face-to-face consultations. Direct physical examination of the patient is impossible, but a limited examination may be undertaken via video (e.g. using visual signals, or asking a patient to press their lower legs and assess fluid retention). Little is currently known about what such video examinations involve. OBJECTIVE To explore the opportunities and challenges of remote physical examination with patients with heart failure using video-mediated communication technology. METHODS Seven video consultations (using FaceTime) between patients with heart failure and their community-based specialist nurses were video-recorded with consent. We used conversation analysis to identify the challenges of remote physical examination over video and the verbal and non-verbal communication strategies used to address them. RESULTS Apart from a general visual overview, remote physical examination in heart failure patients was restricted to assessing fluid retention (by the patient or relative feeling for leg oedema), blood pressure and pulse rate and rhythm (using a self-inflating blood pressure monitor incorporating an irregular heart beat indicator, and put on by the patient or relative-) and oxygen saturation (using a finger clip device). In all seven cases, one or more of these examinations were accomplished via video, generating accurate biometric data for assessment by the clinician. However, video examinations proved challenging for all involved. Participants (patients, clinicians and, sometimes, relatives) needed to collaboratively negotiate three recurrent challenges: (i) adequate design of instructions to guide video examinations (with nurses required to explain tasks using lay language, and checking instructions were followed); (ii) accommodation of the patient’s desire for autonomy (on the part of nurses and relatives) in light of opportunities for involvement in their own physical assessment; and (iii) doing the physical examination while simultaneously making it visible to the nurse (with patients and relatives needing adequate technological knowledge in order to operate a device and make the examination visible to the nurse, as well as basic biomedical knowledge to follow nurses’ instructions). Nurses remained responsible for making a clinical judgment of the adequacy of the examination and the trustworthiness of the data. In sum, despite significant challenges, selected participants in heart failure consultations managed to successfully complete video examinations. CONCLUSIONS Video examinations are possible in the context of heart failure services. However, they are limited, time-consuming and challenging for all involved. Guidance and training are needed to support roll out of this new service model, along with research to understand if the challenges identified are relevant to different patients and conditions and how they can be successfully negotiated.
, Deborah Cameron, , , Shanti Vijayaraghavan, Satyajit Bhattacharya, , Joanne Morris,
Published: 31 July 2018
JMIR research protocols, Volume 7; https://doi.org/10.2196/10913

Abstract:
Remote videoconsulting is promoted by policy makers as a way of delivering health care efficiently to an aging population with rising rates of chronic illness. As a radically new service model, it brings operational and interactional challenges in using digital technologies. In-depth research on this dynamic is needed before remote consultations are introduced more widely. The objective of this study will be to identify and analyze the communication strategies through which remote consultations are accomplished and to guide patients and clinicians to improve the communicative quality of remote consultations. In previous research, we collected and analyzed two separate datasets of remote consultations in a National Institute for Health Research-funded study of clinics in East London using Skype and a Wellcome Trust-funded study of specialist community heart failure teams in Oxford using Skype or FaceTime. The Qualitative Analysis of Remote Consultations (QuARC) study will combine datasets and undertake detailed interactional microanalysis of up to 40 remote consultations undertaken by senior and junior doctors and nurse specialists, including consultations with adults with diabetes, women who have diabetes during pregnancy, people consulting for postoperative cancer surgery and community-based patients having routine heart failure reviews along with up to 25 comparable face-to-face consultations. Drawing on established techniques (eg, conversation analysis), analysis will examine the contextual features in remote consultations (eg, restricted visual field) combined with close analysis of different modes of communication (eg, speech, gesture, and gaze). Our findings will address the current gap in knowledge about how technology shapes the fine detail of communication in remote consultations. Alongside academic outputs, findings will inform the coproduction of information and guidance about communication strategies to support successful remote consultations. Identifying the communication strategies through which remote consultations are accomplished and producing guidance for patients and clinicians about how to use this kind of technology successfully in consultations is an important and timely goal because roll out of remote consultations is planned across the National Health Service. RR1-10.2196/10913.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top