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(searched for: doi:10.1075/prag.27.3.02har)
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Dongqi Han, Yasamin Heshmat, Denise Y. Geiskkovitch, Zixuan Tan, Carman Neustaedter
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction; https://doi.org/10.1145/3514234

Abstract:
Telemedicine systems that involve the use of video conferencing technologies have been available for more than three decades. Yet, they have primarily been used for specialist appointments or within healthcare facilities. We are now seeing a shift with the proliferation of commercial technologies such as smartphone apps that allow people to have appointments with a general practitioner from nearly any location for various reasons. Telemedicine has also seen an uptake due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about how doctors and patients perceive smartphone-based telemedicine systems, what types of medical ailments are best suited for these systems, what socio-technical challenges might emerge through their usage, and how systems should be designed to best meet the needs of both doctors and patients. Thus, we applied a scenario-based design method by presenting a set of medical situations to both general practitioners and patients, and conducted contextual interviews with them to investigate their thoughts on video-based appointments for a range of medical situations. Results show that video consultations using smartphone apps could raise challenges in delivering appropriate care and utilization, conducting camera work to assist different types of examinations, supporting doctor-patient relationship creation and maintenance, allowing doctors to maintain control over the appointment, as well as protecting patients’ and doctors’ privacy. This suggests the need to create designs that can support particular workflows, relationship building, safety and privacy protection, and camera work for varying contexts.
Published: 11 November 2021
Human–Computer Interaction, Volume 37, pp 404-432; https://doi.org/10.1080/07370024.2021.1994859

Abstract:
Casual conversation, where people engage in social talk or phatic communion (Coupland et al., 1992) (i.e., non-task oriented talk) is acknowledged as important in facilitating collaboration among c...
Published: 26 October 2021
Probation Journal, Volume 68, pp 426-443; https://doi.org/10.1177/02645505211050867

Abstract:
The Exceptional Delivery Model for probation practice in England and Wales meant that probation practitioners predominantly worked from home during the COVID-19 pandemic, engaging and supervising service-users remotely. This article explores the impact of the Exceptional Delivery Model on staff and their practice. We begin by considering how probation practice changed because of the implementation of the Exceptional Delivery Model and the impact that this has had on probation staff. The reality of probation work is brought into perspective when there are children in the home and the demarcation of work and home life is easily blurred, especially when considered through the lens of ‘emotional dirty work’. We then present analysis of interviews with 61 practitioners and managers in the National Probation Service. The interviews were primarily focused on staff wellbeing and emotional labour as opposed to the impact of the pandemic, but participants regularly raised the pandemic in discussions. We focus on three key themes: the challenges of working from home and remote communication, experiences of managing risk through doorstep visits and the spill over of probation work into personal lives. The article concludes by considering what the findings tell us about probation work and potential future implications.
Yasamin Heshmat, Carman Neustaedter, Kyle McCaffrey, William Odom, Ron Wakkary, Zikun Yang
Published: 21 April 2020
Abstract:
Family members who are separated across time zones can easily miss out on feeling connected. We designed and studied the usage of an asynchronous storytelling system, called FamilyStories, to explore the use of audio-based sharing. FamilyStories allows family members to share activities and experiences over distance in different time zones using three different devices that contain different contextual features. To evaluate the design, we conducted a five-week long field study with two family member pairs. Our results show the value of slow, flexible, and non-suggestive interfaces for asynchronous audio communication. We also found ephemerality helped in the sharing of 'instant' feelings, while large time zone differences could be 'synchronized' with time delayed messages. We raise these as design opportunities for asynchronous audio storytelling systems.
Lillian Yang, Carman Neustaedter
Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Volume 2, pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1145/3274459

Bran Knowles, Vicki L. Hanson
ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, Volume 25, pp 1-25; https://doi.org/10.1145/3196490

Abstract:
Older adults frequently deploy the concept of distrust when discussing digital technologies, and it is tempting to assume that distrust is largely responsible for the reduced uptake by older adults witnessed in the latest surveys of technology use. To help understand the impact of distrust on adoption behavior, we conducted focus groups with older adults exploring how, in what circumstances, and to what effect older adults articulate distrust in digital technologies. Our findings indicate that distrust is not especially relevant to older adults’ practical decision making around technology (non-)use. The older adults in our study used the language of distrust to open up discussions around digital technologies to larger issues related to values. This suggests that looking to distrust as a predictor of non-use (e.g., in Technology Acceptance Model studies) may be uniquely unhelpful in the case of older adults, as it narrows the discussion of technology acceptance and trust to interactional issues, when their use of distrust pertains to much wider concerns. Likewise, technology adoption should not be viewed as indicative of trust or an endorsement of technology acceptability. Older adults using-while-distrusting offers important insights into how to design truly acceptable digital technologies.
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