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(searched for: doi:10.9734/bjast/2017/28160)
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Diene France de Souza, Marliane De Cássia Soares Da Silva, Maiane de Paula Alves, Dairon Pérez Fuentes, Lucas Eduardo Oliveira Porto, Pedro Vitoriano de Oliveira, Maria Catarina Megumi Kasuya,
Published: 25 September 2021
Waste and Biomass Valorization pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1007/s12649-021-01586-9

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Published: 28 May 2021
by MDPI
Abstract:
The use of substrates supplemented with minerals is a promising strategy for increasing the nutraceutical value of Pleurotus spp. The current research was performed to analyze the effect of substrate supplementation with magnesium (Mg) salts on the Mg content, biomass, and chemical composition of pink oyster mushroom (Pleurotus djamor) fruiting bodies. Before inoculation, substrate was supplemented with MgCl2 × 6 H2O and MgSO4, both salts were applied at three concentrations: 210, 420, and 4200 mg of Mg per 2 kg of substrate. The harvest period included three flushes. Substrate supplementation with 4200 mg of Mg caused the most significant decrease in mushroom productivity, of about 28% for both Mg salts. The dry matter content in fruiting bodies was significantly lower in the treatment in which 210 mg of Mg was applied as MgSO4 in comparison to the control. Supplementation effectively increased the Mg content in fruiting bodies of P. djamor by 19–85% depending on the treatment, and significantly affected the level of remaining bioelements and anions. One hundred grams of pink oyster fruiting bodies, supplemented with Mg salts, provides more than 20% of the Mg dietary value recommended by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA); thus, supplementation can be an effective technique for producing mushrooms that are rich in dietary Mg. Although P. djamor grown in supplemented substrate showed lower productivity, this was evident only in the fresh weight because the differences in dry weight were negligible. Mg supplementation increased the antioxidant activity of the fruiting bodies, phenolic compounds, and some amino acids, including L-tryptophan, and vitamins (thiamine and l-ascorbic acid).
Hend A Hamed, M F Mohamed, M H Hosseny, Kh A.A El-Shaikh
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Volume 690; https://doi.org/10.1088/1755-1315/690/1/012028

Abstract:
This research trial was conducted in the open field to assess the integrated cultivation of oyster mushroom Pleurotus columbinus and field-grown vegetable crops. Oyster mushroom intercropped within cabbage (Brassica oleracea var capitata) and cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var botrytis) rows at the beginning of even head or curd formation. Data revealed superior intercropped cabbage and cauliflower growth parameters and higher yields compared with the respective sole cultivation. Pleurotus columbinus fruiting bodies weight, cab diameter, and total yield were significantly higher for mushroom intercropped with cauliflower than with cabbage. However, no differences or inconsistent differences were observed in fruiting bodies number, cab thickness, stem length, and stem diameter. Analysis of some mushroom fruiting bodies chemical composition showed that mushroom/cabbages intercropping surpassed mushroom/cauliflower intercropping in total phenols. However, no significant difference was observed between cabbages and cauliflowers concerning crude protein, total antioxidant activity, and total flavonoids. It is concluded that oyster mushroom/cabbage or cauliflower intercropping can provide additional marketable protein-rich food as well as enhance cabbage and cauliflower crop productivity based on sustainable practice.
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