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(searched for: doi:10.1080/10967494.2016.1237398)
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Shabana Naveed,
Published: 30 August 2021
International Journal of Public Sector Management, Volume 35, pp 16-33; https://doi.org/10.1108/ijpsm-12-2020-0343

Abstract:
Purpose: With governance networks as the critical emerging feature of public administration, this article examines the structure, governance and challenges of networks in the public sector. Using complexity theory, this article explains that control-based relations do not hold much relevance to govern the complex systems of networks.Design/methodology/approach: Case study research design is employed taking the power network in Pakistan as the unit of analysis. Data were collected through eleven semi-structured interviews, companies' websites, government policy reports and other companies' reports. The structure of the power network was examined through the technique of social network analysis using UCINET. Thematic analysis of interviews was conducted with the help of NVivo 13 to identify the mode of governance and challenges.Findings: The study found that five central public sector actors have a high degree centrality and betweenness centrality. Thematic analysis further revealed that these actors are controlling most of the decisions in the network in a hierarchical mode of governance. Other actors face multiple challenges including lack of autonomy, overlapping authorities, conflicting rules and complex decision processes.Research limitations/implications: The findings imply that instead of top-down and control-based relations, networks require self-governance mechanisms where actors independently participate and interact with other actors to generate common solutions to problems.Practical implications: The authorities should use network management strategies, participatory approaches and consensus-building methods to reach decisions.Originality/value: The study explores the network structure and network governance challenges in the context of a developing country that is barely addressed in the public management literature.
, Bryce Hannibal, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson
Published: 20 January 2020
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 49, pp 734-756; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764019897845

Abstract:
Do interlocking boards provide advantage in the grants marketplace? Drawing upon board data from nine public grant-making organizations in two metropolitan areas and their grant recipients, we test the mediating and moderating relationships between interlocking boards, organizational size, and the size of the grants received. We find that organizational size is not a predictor of grant allocations independent of network characteristics. Larger organizations have larger and better-connected boards, which is associated with larger grants.
, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson,
Published: 17 July 2019
Public Management Review, Volume 22, pp 1443-1463; https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2019.1635192

Abstract:
Public policy increasingly relies upon private philanthropic actors to meet community needs. However, nonprofits located in communities of colour may be disadvantaged in the private grants marketplace. This article examines the complex relationship between grantee location in a community of colour, board networks and the size of grants in public foundations in two metropolitan communities. Larger and better-connected networks are associated with larger grants; however, nonprofits located in communities of colour have smaller and less well-connected networks. These findings confirm the importance of network connections in the grant-making process and raise important questions for future research.
, Abhisekh Ghosh Moulick,
Published: 24 July 2017
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 46, pp 1117-1141; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764017720769

Abstract:
Drawing upon transaction costs economics, we examine the determinants of the two-stage allocation process within the local United Way (UW) system. We use a unique multiyear data set that captures local UW allocations to nonprofit grantees at four points in time (2000, 2004, 2008, and 2010). We find that the first stage is screening, in which organizations’ legitimacy, mission, and financial performance are preliminary determinants of partnership in the UW system. In the second stage, UWs incentivize existing grantees with high legitimacy to stay in the system through larger allocation share. These determinants are stable over time. However, size of these effects varies across size of UW system; this finding suggests that transaction costs influence the likelihood of using performance measures to evaluate grantees in the first stage of the allocation process.
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