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(searched for: doi:10.1080/10508414.2016.1235364)
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Kaden Conley, Davide Piovesan, Xiaoxu Ji
Abstract:
There are nearly 620,000 FAA-certified pilots in the US. Since 1980, the number has dropped by 25%, while the population has grown by over 40%. One reason for such a reduction in sports aviation licenses is the ever-increasing expense of training. Flight simulators have been used for decades for the training of pilots. However, custom software and bulkiness often render their use prohibitive. We are proposing an innovative approach that bridges the gap between personal computer trainers and costly, bulky full flight simulators, by using off-the-shelf hardware and software, but combining them in a novel fashion. A series of Objective motion cueing tests (OMCT) were conducted to demonstrate the frequency response of the complete motion cueing system of the Flight Simulator ensuring the simulator met the required parameters of perception fidelity. This affordable simulator has the potential to revolutionize the industry of flight simulation so that more people will be interested in getting their pilots license.
Published: 10 September 2021
The Teacher Educator pp 1-20; https://doi.org/10.1080/08878730.2021.1973167

Abstract:
The benefits of micro-teaching (pre-service teachers practicing their teaching skills with small groups of peers or students) are well documented. However, the overcrowding of the teacher education curriculum, in part due to regulatory mandates, led many initial teacher education (ITE) programs to abandon using micro-teaching. The focus of this study was to understand the experiences of pre-service teachers who are engaging in real-time simulation technology as a new form of micro-teaching. The analysis of our findings indicated that the use of the mixed-reality learning environments (MRLEs) showed promise in helping build candidate self-confidence and preparing novices for their first “real” teaching practicum. MRLEs appear to be particularly useful for assisting with developing confidence, planning for diverse learners, understanding personalizing pedagogy and engaging with classroom management. We argue the importance of micro-teaching “2.0” as a strategy to “practice before prac” and call for increased inclusion of simulation within ITE programs.
, Dothang Truong
Published: 10 July 2021
Journal: Virtual Reality
Virtual Reality, Volume 26, pp 249-267; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10055-021-00554-x

Abstract:
Virtual reality (VR) is being researched and incorporated into curricula and training programs to expand educational opportunities and enhance learning across many fields. Although researchers are exploring the learning affordances associated with VR, research surrounding students’ perceptions of the technology, and intentions to use it for training has been neglected. The goal of this research was to determine the factors that influence students’ intention to use VR in a dynamic learning environment. An extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was developed that incorporates factors related to education and the use of VR technology in training environments. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) processes were employed. Nine of 14 hypotheses in the original model were supported, and eight of the nine predictor factors of the model were determined to directly or indirectly impact behavioral intention (BI). The original TAM factors had the strongest relationships. Relationships between factors particularly relevant to VR technology and learning were also supported. The results of this study may guide other educators interested in incorporating VR into a dynamic learning environment.
Gholam Reza Emad, Hossein Enshaei,
Australian Journal of Maritime & Ocean Affairs, Volume 14, pp 114-135; https://doi.org/10.1080/18366503.2021.1941725

Abstract:
Autonomous ships are expected to become operational in the foreseeable future. However, so far, most of the discussions have been centred on automation technology with less emphasis on training of seafarers who shall operate them. Depending on the level of autonomy, it is imperative that these ships will still be operated by humans either onshore or onboard. Thus, it is critical to identify the training needs of operators and the facilities that will be required to deliver them. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge on maritime education and training (MET) of future operators of autonomous and unmanned ships. An extensive review of the literature revealed that currently, there is an absence of a framework for training the future operators of autonomous vessels. Moreover, the exact equipment that will be needed for training is also not known. As the literature on operational requirement of autonomous ships is limited, this paper expanded the review of the literature to industries which have already embraced the autonomous systems and in particular the framework utilised for training the workforce that operates and manage those autonomous systems.
, , , Ivana Vasovic Maksimovic, Aleksandar Rakic
International Journal of Aeronautical and Space Sciences, Volume 22, pp 874-885; https://doi.org/10.1007/s42405-021-00358-y

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Sanna Aronsson, Henrik Artman, Sinna Lindquist, Mikael Mitchell, Tomas Persson, Robert Ramberg, Mario Romero, Pontus ter Vehn
The Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation: Applications, Methodology, Technology, Volume 16, pp 219-231; https://doi.org/10.1177/1548512918823296

Abstract:
This article presents the design and evaluation of visualization concepts supporting After Action Review (AAR) in simulator mission training of fast-jet fighter pilots. The visualization concepts were designed based on three key characteristics of representations: re-representation, graphical constraining, and computational offloading. The visualization concepts represent combined parameters of missile launch and threat range, the former meant to elicit discussions about the prerequisites for launching missiles, and the latter to present details of what threats a certain aircraft is facing at a specific moment. The visualization concepts were designed to: 1) perceptually and cognitively offload mental workload from participants in support of determining relevant situations to discuss; 2) re-represent parameters in a format that facilitates reading-off of crucial information; and 3) graphically constrain plausible interpretations. Through a series of workshop iterations, two visualization concepts were developed and evaluated with 11 pilots and instructors. All pilots were unanimous in their opinion that the visualization concepts should be implemented as part of the AAR. Offloading, in terms of finding interesting events in the dynamic and unique training sessions, was the most important guiding concept, while re-representation and graphical constraining enabled a more structured and grounded collaboration during the AAR.
, Wu Yi Zheng, Michael A. Regan
Published: 1 November 2018
Applied ergonomics, Volume 73, pp 100-107; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2018.06.004

Abstract:
The WOMBAT pilot selection test is widely used to select candidates for pilot training programs. Despite use in many countries, little information is available regarding the predictive validity of the test. This study was designed to test the ability of the WOMBAT test to predict performance outcomes in a sample of ab-initio pilots. Sixty students commenced the study in 3 cohorts, and completed the WOMBAT test before their performance in the training program was evaluated through flight time to solo, flight time to licence level achievement, and instructor ratings of performance. Higher WOMBAT total scores were significantly related to reduced time to solo, achieving flight licences, as well as some early ratings of performance by flight instructors. Further research now needs to examine the exact nature of the skills and abilities that the test indexes in order to further improve pilot selection and training procedures.
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