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(searched for: doi:10.1080/08276331.2013.876761)
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Douglas Chiguvi
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147- 4478), Volume 11, pp 423-429; https://doi.org/10.20525/ijrbs.v11i10.2115

Abstract:
The unprecedented rate of urbanization across the world has led to increased demand for good, affordable housing. This research was conducted to ascertain the reasons and challenges of urbanization on housing shortages in Gaborone, Botswana. The focal point of this study was to assess the impact of urbanization on the demand of housing in Gaborone, Botswana. Thereafter the study recommended astute strategies desirable to curb the problem of urbanization and scarcity of accommodation in Gaborone. This research used a descriptive research design and distributed questionnaires to Gaborone residents during data collection. The researchers used stratified and clustered sampling methods. The study results indicated the need for better educational facilities and employment opportunities as the major causes of urbanization in Gaborone. Shortage of housing, high rentals and escalating land prices were also identified as some of the major challenges of urbanization in Gaborone. The study recommended that the government to introduce rent control measures to restrict rising prices, the private sector should be encouraged to further participate in the provision of accommodation for different income groups to be sold or leased at subsidized rates. The study also recommended the government to buy plenty of land and real estate, to reduce speculative behaviour of land barons.
Published: 24 March 2022
by MDPI
Journal: Economies
Abstract:
The primary objective of this study is to explain the factors that influence the continuance intention of accountants to use an accounting information system (AIS) in the context of Jordanian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Accountants are the main AIS users, and their system acceptance and use are crucial to evaluating the successful implementation of the system. The study conducted a cross-sectional survey on SMEs that have fully implemented an AIS. The proposed framework of the study is based on the extended unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model and top management support (TMS). The results revealed that the examined variables, namely effort expectancy, performance expectancy and facilitating conditions, have a positive effect on the continuance intention of accountants to use AIS, with TMS having a significant and negative effect on such intention to use. In addition, social influence was found to be significantly related to continuance intention, confirming the need to support technologies such as AIS among SMEs. The study findings contribute to UTAUT theory as they supported the effects of TMS on continuance intention to use and established the study framework measurement accuracy in the context of Jordanian SMEs.
, Stewart Thornhill, Dan K. Hsu
Published: 3 March 2021
Journal of Small Business Management, Volume 59; https://doi.org/10.1080/00472778.2021.1883037

Abstract:
Entrepreneurs play multiple roles in their daily lives, and these roles can influence their decisions. Yet we know little about how entrepreneurs respond to simultaneous influences from different domains. We examine how entrepreneurs’ persistence decisions are jointly influenced by owner role pressure, family role pressure, and community role pressure and whether female and male entrepreneurs make decisions differently. Results indicate that owner role pressure interacts with family role pressure to influence persistence decisions. Further, female entrepreneurs are influenced more by owner role pressure, but interestingly, male entrepreneurs are influenced more by community role pressure. Our research suggests that entrepreneurs should be aware of the role pressure driving their persistence with underperforming ventures. Educators and support organizations can direct entrepreneurs’ attention to the multiple roles they play in life and increase their awareness of how persistence decisions can be jointly influenced by those roles and the gender differences in the decisions.
Published: 15 August 2020
Entrepreneurship Research Journal, Volume 13, pp 131-162; https://doi.org/10.1515/erj-2019-0358

Abstract:
In this paper, we use Cultural Consensus as a theory and methodology and collect and analyze individuals’ mental models of entrepreneurship. This novel approach, combined with social network analysis, allows us to empirically study the shared cultural beliefs present within a nascent EE. Based on this case, we determine that, in contrast to mature ecosystems, the cultural beliefs within this nascent entrepreneurial ecosystem clearly prioritize action and behavioral elements over individual characteristics or entrepreneurial-related outcomes. Thus, our study suggests that the cultural beliefs within early ecosystems are different than the cultural beliefs that underpin mature ecosystems. We discuss implications and future research related to these findings and this approach.
Scott Loveridge,
Published: 27 May 2016
International Regional Science Review, Volume 41; https://doi.org/10.1177/0160017616650488

Abstract:
Rural leaders can point to low housing costs as a reason that their area should be competitive for business attraction. To what extent do rural housing costs offset transportation and other locational disadvantages in cost structures? The United States lacks information to systematically answer the question. We adapt a strategy employed by The Economist in exploring purchasing power parity: the Big Mac index. We gather information on Big Mac prices with a random sample of restaurants across the contiguous United States. We find that core metro counties exhibit slightly higher Big Mac prices than other counties, but that differences across the balance of the rural–urban continuum code are not significant, implying that costs in a metroadjacent county are not different than areas that are much more rural. We show that some groups of states exhibit lower prices, especially in the southeast. Furthermore, we test for the presence of spatial monopoly and find that distance to other MacDonald’s restaurants has some influence on price. Stores at a greater distance from their competitors tend to charge more, ceteris paribus. We also show our results are consistent with other localized estimates of living costs. Our general findings could help rural decision makers determine whether their area truly holds cost advantages for firms looking to relocate.
, Michael W.-P. Fortunato, James E. Allen Iv, Ronald J. Hustedde, Helen Pushkarskaya
Published: 29 May 2015
Community Development, Volume 46, pp 516-540; https://doi.org/10.1080/15575330.2015.1080743

Abstract:
This article proposes a scale that measures the local entrepreneurial culture of a place based on residents’ perceptions. The initial 36-item pool was developed through semi-structured interviews with entrepreneurs and non-entrepreneurs in Kentucky (USA) and then reviewed by a focus group composed of entrepreneurship coaches. These items were included in an extensive survey of rural and urban Kentuckians. Factor analysis resulted in a 17-item scale with four major components. To ascertain the predictive validity of the subscales, a series of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) models evaluated their correlations with county-level rates of entrepreneurship obtained from an independent data set. The analysis confirmed that perceptions of the local entrepreneurial culture do correlate with entrepreneurial activity. In line with the theoretical model presented in this article, the ANCOVAs also controlled for the modulating effect of important individual-level characteristics and regional factors. The proposed scale is recommended for use by entrepreneurship support programs that provide one-on-one assistance for small businesses, yet seldom assess nor consider how they might improve the entrepreneurial culture of the place where these businesses operate. Furthermore, this measure is an important contribution to entrepreneurship research. Existing measures of entrepreneurial culture focus mostly on the regional and national levels, overlooking the role of local cultural characteristics; they also tend to focus on general cultural attributes rather than on residents’ perceptions of the entrepreneurial climate. This entrepreneurship culture scale opens the door to new directions in research.
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