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(searched for: pmid:16350041)
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Liziane Schittler, Luana Martins Perin, Juliana De Lima Marques, Vanessa Lando, Svetoslav Dimitrov Todorov, Luís Augusto Nero,
Journal of Food Science and Technology, Volume 56, pp 5128-5137; https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-019-03985-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Patcharee Treebavonkusol, Sunisa Kittisrisopit, Thitirut Jaichalad, , Achaporn Kootmas, Imboon Nualsri
Published: 28 February 2017
Food Science and Biotechnology, Volume 26, pp 173-179; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-017-0023-4

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, Inmaculada Fernández-No, Marcos Quintela-Baluja, Karola Böhme, Mebrouk Kihal, Pilar Calo-Mata,
BioMed Research International, Volume 2014, pp 1-10; https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/853238

Abstract:
Information on the microbiology of camel milk is very limited. In this work, the genetic characterization and proteomic identification of 13 putative producing bacteriocinLeuconostocstrains exhibiting antilisterial activity and isolated from camel milk were performed. DNA sequencing of the 13 selected strains revealed high homology among the 16S rRNA genes for all strains. In addition, 99% homology withLeuconostoc mesenteroideswas observed when these sequences were analysed by the BLAST tool against other sequences from reference strains deposited in the Genbank. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDITOF MS) which allowed for the identification of 2 mass peaks 6242 m/z and 5118 m/z that resulted to be specific to the speciesL. mesenteroides. Remarkably, the phyloproteomic tree provided more intraspecific information ofL. mesenteroidesthan phylogenetic analysis. Accordingly, phyloproteomic analysis groupedL. mesenteroidesstrains into different subbranches, while allL. mesenteroidesisolates were grouped in the same branch according to phylogenetic analysis. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first report on the use of MALDI-TOF MS on the identification of LAB isolated from camel milk.
, Hanane Fatma Chentouf, Bellil Yahia, Ghazi Fatima, Marcos Quintela-Baluja, Pilar Calo-Mata,
Published: 11 December 2013
BioMed Research International, Volume 2013, pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/418132

Abstract:
Two strains (B7 and Z8) of theLeuconostoc mesenteroidessubspeciesmesenteroidesthat were isolated from Algerian camel milk from an initial pool of 13 strains and demonstrated a high ability to inhibit the growth ofListeriaspp. were selected and characterised at the phenotypic and genotypic levels. Probiotic profiling and inhibition spectra against food borne pathogens in mixed cultures were also investigated. The bacteriocin produced byL. mesenteroidesstrain B7 was identified as leucocin B by specific PCR.In vitrostudies demonstrated that bothLeuconostoc mesenteroidesstrains exhibited a marked probiotic profile, showing high survival at low pH (2-3 and 4) in the presence of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% of bile salts and at pH 3 in the presence of 3 mg/mL pepsin. Susceptibility testing against antimicrobial agents was also performed for both strains. When tested in a mixed culture withListeria innocua,Listeria ivanovii, orStaphylococcus aureus, strain B7 reduced the numbers of these species by 1.87, 1.78, and 1.38 log units, respectively. Consequently, these two strains were found to possess good probiotic propertiesin vitroand a high capacity forListeriaspp. inhibition in mixed cultures. Therefore, these strains have a favourable technological aptitude and a potential application as novel probiotic starters.
Tejinder Pal Singh, Gurpreet Kaur, , Ulrich Schillinger, Claudia Guigas,
Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins, Volume 4, pp 47-58; https://doi.org/10.1007/s12602-012-9090-2

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, Prateksha Gupta, Satish R. Wate
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Volume 184, pp 6627-6635; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10661-011-2447-2

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Michael E. Stiles
Published: 1 October 1996
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, Volume 70, pp 331-345; https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00395940

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B González, P Arca, B Mayo, J E Suárez
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 60, pp 2158-2163

Abstract:
A bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus plantarum LL441 was selected from the inhibitory products of 75 mesophilic lactobacilli because of its potency and broad spectrum. It is a peptide of 3.5 kDa whose amino-terminal sequence is NH2-K-K-T-K-K-N-X-S-G-D-I-. It is bactericidal and, in some cases, bacteriolytic. The peptide, called plantaricin C, retained its activity after boiling, storage, and treatment at different pHs.
W J Lyon, B A Glatz
Published: 1 January 1993
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 59, pp 83-88

Abstract:
Production of propionicin PLG-1 by Propionibacterium thoenii P127 was pH dependent, with maximal activity detected in supernatants of cultures grown at pH 7.0 Propionicin PLG-1 was purified by ion-exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of propionicin PLG-1 purified through isoelectric focusing resolved a protein band with a molecular weight of 10,000. Propionicin PLG-1 was bactericidal to sensitive cells, demonstrating single-hit kinetics. The producing strain harbored a single plasmid (pLG1) with an approximate size of 250 kb. Preliminary data indicate that both propionicin PLG-1 and immunity to the bacteriocin are encoded on the chromosome. Exposure of strain P127 to acriflavine or to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine yielded isolates that no longer produced bacteriocin activity and isolates that were cured of the plasmid. However, loss of bacteriocin production was not correlated with loss of the plasmid. Isolates cured of the plasmid were phenotypically identical to plasmid-bearing cells in fermentation patterns, pigment production, and growth characteristics.
A K Bhunia, M G Johnson
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 58, pp 2315-20

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L J Harris, H P Fleming, T R Klaenhammer
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 58, pp 1477-83

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A Okereke, T J Montville
Published: 1 December 1991
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 57, pp 3423-3428

Abstract:
The bacteriocinogenicity of Lactococcus lactis ATCC 11454, Pediococcus pentosaceus ATCC 43200, P. pentosaceus ATCC 43201, Lactobacillus plantarum BN, L. plantarum LB592, L. plantarum LB75, and Lactobacillus acidophilus N2 against Clostridium botulinum spores at 4, 10, 15, and 35 degrees C was investigated by modified deferred and simultaneous antagonism methods. All the strains, except L. acidophilus N2, produced inhibition zones on lawns of C. botulinum spores at 30 degrees C. L. plantarum BN, L. lactis ATCC 11454, and P. pentosaceus ATCC 43200 and 43201 were bacteriocinogenic at 4, 10, and 15 degrees C. Supplementation of brain heart infusion agar with 0 to 5% NaCl increased the radii of inhibition zones during simultaneous antagonism assays. Detectable bacteriocin activities were extracted from freeze-thawed agar cultures of L. plantarum BN and L. lactis ATCC 11454 which had been grown at 4 and 10 degrees C. These results suggest that low levels of L. plantarum BN or L. lactis ATCC 11454, in the presence of 3 or 4% NaCl, could be formulated into minimally processed refrigerated food products for protection against possible botulism hazards.
Wanda J. Lyon, Bonita A. Glatz
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 57, pp 701-706

Abstract:
A partially purified bacteriocin produced by Propionibacterium thoenii designated propionicin PLG-1 was found to be active against closely related species and exhibited a broad spectrum of activity against other microorganisms. Propionicin PLG-1 was found to be heat labile, sensitive to several proteolytic enzymes, and stable at pH 3 to 9. Propionicin PLG-1 was isolated from solid medium, partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation, and purified further by gel filtration. Gel filtration experiments revealed that bacteriocin PLG-1 was present as two different protein aggregates with apparent molecular weights of more than 150,000 and approximately 10,000. Resolution of these protein aggregates by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a protein common to both with an apparent molecular weight of 10,000.
U Schillinger, F K Lücke
Published: 1 August 1989
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 55, pp 1901-1906

Abstract:
A total of 221 strains of Lactobacillus isolated from meat and meat products were screened for antagonistic activities under conditions that eliminated the effects of organic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Nineteen strains of Lactobacillus sake, three strains of Lactobacillus plantarum, and one strain of Lactobacillus curvatus were shown to inhibit the growth of some other lactobacilli in an agar spot test; and cell-free supernatants from 6 of the 19 strains of L. sake exhibited inhibitory activity against indicator organisms. Comparison of the antimicrobial spectra of the supernatants suggested that the inhibitory compounds were not identical. One of the six strains, L. sake Lb 706, was chosen for further study. The compound excreted by L. sake Lb 706 was active against various lactic acid bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes. Its proteinaceous nature, narrow inhibitory spectrum, and bactericidal mode of action indicated that this substance is a bacteriocin, which we designated sakacin A. Curing experiments with two bacteriocin-producing strains of L. sake resulted in mutants that lacked both bacteriocin activity and immunity to the bacteriocin. Plasmid profile analysis of L. sake Lb 706 and two bacteriocin-negative variants of this strain indicated that a plasmid of about 18 megadaltons may be involved in the formation of bacteriocin and immunity to this antibacterial compound. In mixed culture, the bacteriocin-sensitive organisms were killed after the bacteriocin-producing strain reached maximal cell density, whereas there was no decrease in cell number in the presence of the bacteriocin-negative variant.
Mark A. Daeschel, Todd R. Klaenhammer
Published: 1 December 1985
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 50, pp 1538-1541

Abstract:
Pediococcus pentosaceus FBB61 and L7230, isolated from cucumber fermentations, produced a bacteriocin, designated pediocin A, which had identical activity spectra against species of Pediococcus, Clostridium, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus. Both strains possessed a 13.6-megadalton plasmid (pMD136). Plasmid curing experiments suggested that both bacteriocin immunity and production determinants were encoded by pMD136. Use of pediocin-producing strains in food fermentations is discussed.
Donald C. Graham, Larry L. McKay
Published: 1 August 1985
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Volume 50, pp 532-534

Abstract:
Five parental strains of Pediococcus were examined for plasmid content. Each strain contained three to six resident plasmids, ranging in size from 4.5 to 39.5 megadaltons. A bacteriocin-like substance produced by Pediococcus cerevisiae FBB63 was tentatively linked to a 10.5-megadalton plasmid after being cured with novobiocin.
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