Refine Search

New Search

Results: 12

(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764016643608)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
, Teshanee Williams, Honey Minkowitz, Alexandra Lahoud
Published: 3 November 2022
The American Review of Public Administration, Volume 52, pp 573-585; https://doi.org/10.1177/02750740221133754

Abstract:
While the public values of efficiency, effectiveness, and equity have been extensively studied in the public sector, very little research exists in the nonprofit context. In particular, we lack an understanding of what public values nonprofit leaders prioritize, why they prioritize certain public values over others, and how they balance or make tradeoffs between public values. Thirty-six Habitat for Humanity affiliate leaders from the United States were interviewed for this research. Interestingly, while the nonprofit leaders in the sample represent the same mission, they all prioritize different public values—though a plurality focuses on equity. We also found that the three primary challenges they perceive in achieving these public values relate to access, quality, and capacity. While Habitat leaders already apply strategies to deal with these challenges, we offer some additional suggestions for Habitat affiliates and similar affordable homeownership nonprofits to consider.
Markus Pohlmann,
Published: 12 December 2021
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Charles M. Schweik, Saba Siddiki, Doug Rice, Isaac Wolfson
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations pp 1-8; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-021-00423-w

Abstract:
Institutions—defined as strategies, norms and rules (Ostrom Understanding institutional diversity, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2005)—are omnipresent in third sector contexts. In this paper, we present the Institutional Grammar (IG) as a theoretically informed approach to support institutional analysis in third sector research. More specifically, the IG coding syntax allows the researcher to systematically wade through rich text and (transcribed) spoken language to identify and dissect institutional statements into finer syntactical segments of interest to the researcher. It is a versatile method that can generate data for small- or large-N research projects and can be integrated with mixed-method research designs. After first introducing and describing the IG, we present a case study to illustrate how a IG-based syntactic analysis can be leveraged to inform third sector research. In the case, we ask: Do the rules embedded in regulatory text addressing the involuntary dissolution of charity organizations differ between bifurcated and unitary jurisdictions in the United States? Using IG’s ABDICO 2.0 syntax, we identify eleven “Activation Condition” (AC) categories that trigger action and assess variation among the 46 jurisdictions. We ultimately conclude that the rules do not differ between bifurcated and unitary jurisdictions, but that finding is not the primary concern. The case demonstrates IG as an important methodological advance that yields granular, structured analyses of rules, norms and strategies in third sector settings that may be difficult to identify with other methods. We then emphasize four areas of third sector research that could benefit from the addition of IG-based methods: analysis of (1) rule compliance, (2) inter-organizational collaboration, (3) comparative study of institutional design, and (4) the study of institutional change. We close the paper with some reflections on where IG-based analysis is headed.
Published: 24 July 2019
Policy Studies Journal, Volume 50, pp 315-339; https://doi.org/10.1111/psj.12361

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Jonathan C. Kamkhaji,
Published: 25 March 2019
Journal of Chinese Governance, Volume 4, pp 163-180; https://doi.org/10.1080/23812346.2019.1575502

Abstract:
The Institutional Grammar Tool (IGT) is an important and relatively recent innovation in policy theory and analysis. It is conceptualized to empirically operationalize the insights of the Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) framework. In the last decade, political scientists have offered a number of applications of the IGT, mainly focused on disclosing and scrutinizing in-depth the textual configurations of policy documents. These efforts, involving micro-level analyses of syntax as well as more general classifications of institutional statements according to rule types, have underpinned empirical projects mainly in the area of environmental and common-pool resources. Applications of IGT are still in their infancy, yet the growing momentum is sufficient for us to review what has been learned so far. We take stock of this recent, fast-growing literature, analyzing a corpus of 26 empirical articles employing IGTs published between 2008 and 2017. We examine them in terms of their empirical domain, hypotheses, and methods of selection and analysis of institutional statements. We find that the existing empirical applications do not add much to explanation, unless they are supported by research questions and hypotheses grounded in theory. We offer three conclusions. First, to exploit the IGT researchers need to go beyond the descriptive, computational approach that has dominated the field until now. Second, IGT studies grounded in explicit hypotheses have more explanatory leverage, and therefore, should be encouraged when adopting the tool outside the Western world. Third, by focusing on rules, researchers can capture findings that are more explanatory and less microscopic.
Linda Melnick, Ron Baker
Published: 16 January 2019
Ssrn Electronic Journal; https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3316982

Abstract:
Voluntary amateur grass-roots sports organizations have been increasingly progressing from amateur and volunteer-based organizations to professional entities. This progression, prompted by increased demands for accountability, represents a significant shift in the institutional logics that define the ‘rules of the game’. The purpose of this study is to explore how changes in the accountability requirements faced by VSOs in the sport of volleyball in Canada has led to the adoption of professionalised, business-like accounting practices over time. This study explores the role of accountability in the mobilization of professionalism in an environment highly committed to the amateur ideal and the volunteerism that supports it. Findings indicate that the accounting practices adopted by volunteer leaders to address management challenges have acted as a carrier of professional values resulting in the co-existence of logics and a progression towards ‘business-like’ organizational change.
Kevin D. Ward, Danielle M. Varda, Diana Epstein, Barbara Lane
The American Review of Public Administration, Volume 48, pp 852-871; https://doi.org/10.1177/0275074017745354

Abstract:
This article details the development and implementation of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Corps program, a federal interagency partnership. While many federal agencies partner through fee-for-service arrangements and contracts, few contemporary examples of interagency program creation and implementation are available. This article develops an interagency collaboration framework by drawing from the collaboration literature, as well as literature on institutions, to examine the development of this unique partnership. This research draws on key informant interviews and content analysis of documentation, including the interagency agreement (IAA), historical records, memos, meeting minutes, and participant observations. Findings suggest that even in formal IAAs, a strong history of informal institutional collaboration may be an important antecedent of forming and implementing collaborative arrangements. Similarly, the presence of a champion may play an important role in cultivating and developing both informal and formal institutions that create an opportunity to collaborate. Finally, the rules-in-use and the rules-in-form may vary at different levels of management. As the federal government increasingly employs interagency partnerships, this article provides lessons for developing relationships, identifying and understanding roles, crossing organizational boundaries, and merging both agency cultures and administrative processes.
, Carolin J. Waldner, Yasemin I. Dere, Yuka Matsuo, Kevin Högy
Published: 22 June 2017
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 46, pp 1092-1105; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764017720770

Abstract:
In this study, we experimentally test the impact of a formal signal (a third-party certificate) and an informal signal (self-proclaimed management quality with respect to social entrepreneurship) on stakeholder supportive intentions and perceived organizational effectiveness. Our study confirms the social entrepreneurship advantage, but we find no proof of a convincing effect from the formal signal. However, complementary analyses and additional testing of control variables add new perspectives on the relative importance of the social entrepreneurship advantage and on potential moderators that could better explain in future studies the varying effects and specific contextual elements that influence formal and informal reputation-building signals.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top