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(searched for: doi:10.1080/21670811.2016.1139904)
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Published: 23 August 2021
Journalism Practice pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1969987

Abstract:
Against the relentless speed-driven nature of today’s journalism industry, the notion of a decidedly slower type of journalism seems to be gaining traction amongst both industry practitioners and audiences. In direct contradiction to the ‘breaking news’ mentality that governs most modern newsrooms (Lewis and Cushion 2009 Lewis, J., and S. Cushion. 2009. “The Thirst to be First: An Analysis of Breaking News Stories and Their Impact on the Quality of 24-Hour News Coverage in the UK.” Journalism Practice 3 (3): 304–318.[Taylor & Francis Online] , [Google Scholar]), slow journalism calls for the purposeful slowing down of news production to create an alternative form of journalism that advocates for a higher quality and depth in content (Le Masurier 2015 Le Masurier, M. 2015. “What is Slow Journalism?” Journalism Practice 9 (2): 138–152.[Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®] , [Google Scholar]). This paper aims to add to the literature on slow journalism by analysing how a particular publication, the popular literary lifestyle magazine, Kinfolk, actively pursues, portrays, and presents the practice of slow journalism. Based on a textual analysis of the editor’s letters from 30 issues of Kinfolk, this study found that the practice of slow journalism is manifested in the magazine through four ways: an emphasis on community, advocating for slowness in both production and consumption of content, and a niche editorial presentation. Findings from this study should help scholars to improve the theorising of the concept of slow journalism, and also help contribute to a better understanding of the larger changes happening in the journalism field.
Guillermo Gurrutxaga Rekondo, ,
Published: 13 May 2021
Journal: Palabra Clave
Palabra Clave, Volume 24, pp 1-28; https://doi.org/10.5294/pacla.2021.24.2.3

Abstract:
Este artículo presenta algunas claves de la situación actual del periodismo reposado digital o digital slow journalism (SJ) en el contexto colombiano. Para ello, analiza los resultados de una investigación sobre audiencias y estudia la óptica de medios encuadrados en esta corriente periodística. El artículo pone en común, por un lado, los resultados de una encuesta dirigida a la población colombiana realizada en julio de 2019 y cuyo objeto fue conocer las opiniones y hábitos de consumo del periodismo reposado. Destaca, entre sus resultados, el elevado conocimiento que existe en el país con respecto a la prensa narrativa. De hecho, el 56 % de los lectores de prensa digital colombianos ha accedido alguna vez a ella. Por otro lado, al mismo tiempo, el estudio contrasta los intereses, percepciones y demandas del público con la respuesta dada por dos medios de SJ colombianos, Arcadia y La Silla Vacía, a través de un estudio cualitativo y comparado. La principal conclusión es que los lectores colombianos valoran este tipo de periodismo (le otorgan una calificación de 4 puntos sobre 5) y hay un 58 % de lectores que se manifiesta dispuesto a pagar por su plus de calidad. A pesar de los problemas de financiación a los que se enfrentan estos medios, la investigación vislumbra un nicho de mercado creciente para el SJ en Colombia.
, Paul Scott
Published: 20 January 2021
Journalism Practice pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1874485

Abstract:
Conceptualisation and theoretical understanding of slow journalism has developed over more than a decade in reaction to the fast-paced journalism so prevalent in contemporary, mainstream media. Articulated in 2007 by Susan Greenberg, the slow journalism movement encompasses attributes such as deep, non-sensational storytelling, transparency, participatory involvement, community service and ethical practice. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s (ABC) foray into slow journalism over the last several years via the Remote Communities Project (RCP) enables reporters to spend up to two weeks in a remote or rural community and find what the project management team call “the untold stories”. As part of a research project investigating the RCP, 15 journalists, producers and managers from the ABC were interviewed. When these participants were asked to reflect upon their understanding of slow journalism, several themes emerged: this form entails a change in practice; the importance of community engagement; and the ability to invest time in finding and developing stories. This article reports on those themes through the lens of participant reflection and Pierre Bourdieu’s cultural production model to develop a better understanding of how reporters who undertook projects for the RCP view the process of slow journalism and implications for journalistic practice.
Published: 11 January 2021
Journalism Practice, Volume 16, pp 1578-1596; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2020.1870530

Abstract:
The pressure of immediacy, the dictatorship of the click, and the growing avalanche of fake news have impacted journalism. Citizens are particularly skeptical about the information they receive from the press, especially in the digital media. Journalism is faced with the need – or almost the urgency – to rethink, reinvent and redefine messages, routines, and processes. In this regard, various initiatives, especially in Ibero-America, have opted for slow journalism as a reaction and response to information devaluation. The commitment to journalism that appreciates context and cares for narrative has driven this "slow" news trend that believes in "author journalism" and stories' humanization. Through the methodology of the case study, of a qualitative and exploratory nature, 12 experiences of "slow journalism" media in Ibero-America are reviewed, with a particular interest in their themes, contents, aesthetics, and sources of financing. It is concluded that these media are one of the few that carry out investigative journalism, although to subsist, they depend to a great extent on international cooperation agencies since their contents and aesthetics are elitist in comparison with their conventional digital peers, which reduces their capacity of maintenance by subscriptions and advertising.
Published: 13 September 2020
Journalism Practice, Volume 16, pp 848-863; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2020.1818609

Abstract:
Slow news can be seen as a potential solution to one of the central problems currently pertaining to journalism, news fatigue. By publishing fewer stories and providing news curation, slow news media offer an alternative to the overwhelming supply of fast news in today's media environment. However, we lack knowledge about the antecedents and consequences of slow news consumption: who are willing to use this type of journalism and, if they are, how will it affect their news fatigue? In order to examine these questions, this study presents a longitudinal field experiment with two survey waves and tracking data of the respondents’ consumption of a free membership to a Danish slow news media. Results show that slow news is most likely to attract consumers already engaged with news and that consumption to some extent is increasing their news fatigue. Thereby, the study illustrates how the good intentions of the slow journalism movement are not easily fulfilled.
, Paul Scott, Christina Koutsoukos
Published: 1 June 2020
Australian Journalism Review, Volume 42, pp 77-92; https://doi.org/10.1386/ajr_00020_1

Abstract:
In early 2018, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) launched a ‘slow journalism’ initiative, funded by the ABC’s Remote Communities Project (RCP). Reporters and producers from regional and local ABC radio stations were invited to pitch for funding that would facilitate up to two weeks in remote, rural and regional communities to create stories that would provide audiences with insight into life outside of metropolitan cities. The ABC labelled this project ‘slow journalism’ because the reporters were working without the time constraints highly influential in contemporary work practices associated with delivering bulletins, online updates and fast turnarounds of workflows. Through interviews undertaken with personnel involved in the initiative, including reporters, producers and ABC management, this article analyses the pilot project carried out in December 2017. The article also examines the pilot project’s influence in shaping project implementation as well as its relationship to ‘slow journalism’, as defined in previous academic studies. We contend that while the RCP contains elements commonly associated with slow journalism, it also adds to the understanding of slow journalism as both a practice and a concept by discovering characteristics specific to public broadcasting models such as that reflected by the ABC.
Published: 11 November 2019
Journalism Studies, Volume 21, pp 459-476; https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670x.2019.1686410

Abstract:
News avoidance is considered an increasing problem for the news industry and democracy at large. As news companies lose consumers, democracy loses the informed foundation for an engaged citizenry. Meanwhile, research on news avoidance is hampered by the lack of a common understanding of the phenomenon. In this conceptual study, we first review and discuss extant conceptualizations and operationalisations of news avoidance. Second, we present a model distinguishing two types of news avoidance—intentional and unintentional—depending on the underlying causes leading people to tune out. Third, we argue that different solutions apply to the two types of news avoidance. To engage intentional news avoiders, the news selection and news presentation must to be changed. To engage unintentional news avoiders, the opportunity structures provided in the media system must be more favourable towards inadvertent news exposure.
, Christopher D. Tulloch
Published: 29 September 2019
Communication & Sport, Volume 9, pp 603-624; https://doi.org/10.1177/2167479519878674

Abstract:
In a cluttered and increasingly complex environment characterized by the multiplication of platforms, a constellation of quality football print magazines has emerged as an alternative destination in sports journalism. To trace the expansion of the independent football magazine market, in-depth interviews were conducted with the editors of eight prestigious projects from seven countries: Howler (United States), Panenka and Líbero (Spain), Mundial (United Kingdom), So Foot (France), 11 Freunde (Germany), Offside (Sweden), and Ballesterer (Austria). Independent football magazines position themselves as part of a journalistic counteroffensive to the metric-driven, routinized, and complacent approach that currently shapes mainstream sports media output. In contrast to the primary orientation of sports journalism towards economic capital, their editorial philosophy is built on three core axes aimed at developing cultural capital: (1) a diverse and multifaceted football agenda that embraces unheard voices and far-reaching issues of a sociocultural, geopolitical, and economic nature; (2) the importance of dedicating time and resources to create a visually distinctive output; and (3) a deliberate emphasis on nostalgia and resistance to the seemingly endless commodification of football. As part of their creative approach, gathering and nourishing a community of readers has been fundamental to the growth and sustainability of those projects.
Megan Le Masurier
Published: 29 April 2019
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 May 2018
Journal: Nordicom Review
Nordicom Review, Volume 39, pp 3-17; https://doi.org/10.1515/nor-2017-0417

Abstract:
This article examines Storylab, a collaborative learning project between the journalism programme at Stockholm University and the engineering programme in media technology at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, designed to combine journalistic storytelling with pervasive media technology. The aim of the study is to identify and reflect on the challenges associated with the approach. The methods used are a survey and semi-structured interviews with the students. The analyses draw on research concerning the current main challenges for the news industry and journalism educators. The results show that Storylab was highly appreciated, and provided students with useful skills for their professional lives. However, not all groups worked well together, and some students wished that the collaboration had been more extensive. Differences in motivations and priorities were mentioned as restraining factors. Therefore, it is argued that for a sustainable media landscape, journalists and engineers must collaborate, and that this cooperation can be brought about during professional training.
Published: 4 January 2017
Digital Journalism, Volume 5, pp 652-672; https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2016.1263159

Abstract:
The consolidation of the counter genre that is long-form sports journalism (LFSJ) is of growing interest to the sports media researcher. In order to trace its expansion across the sports journalism landscape, this article offers a comparative transatlantic case study featuring the entire collection of long-form stories developed by two prestigious publications: the American magazine Sports Illustrated (SI Longform) and the French sports daily L’Équipe (L’Équipe Explore). The study considers the slow journalism heritage of LFSJ and its challenge to established Web interface theology while exploring key issues such as the sports agenda, sourcing and the use of immersive multimedia formats, aimed at improving the sporting culture of its users. The article concludes by considering the pivotal role of LFSJ in the brand-building strategies of the media outlets themselves.
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