Refine Search

New Search

Result: 1

(searched for: doi:10.17238/issn2221-2698.2015.21.42)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Vladimir M. Kapitsyn, , Alexander E. Shaparov
Published: 1 January 2022
Journal: Baltic Region
Baltic Region, Volume 14, pp 98-114; https://doi.org/10.5922/2079-8555-2022-2-7

Abstract:
Denmark upholds high standards of human rights as long as the interests of its citizens are concerned but erects barriers for migrants with a dissimilar cultural background who might threaten the security of the national community. The Danish tradition of liberalism, humanism and the welfare state coexists with one of Europe’s most restrictive policies towards third-country immigrants. This article traces the evolution of management approaches to developing the immigration policy and integrating foreign cultural migrants in Denmark; the value determinants of these changes are described. Using the neo-institutional methodology, the authors analyse how the value determinants of Denmark’s immigration policy evolved and look at the national norms and practices of integrating migrants having a different cultural background. A restrictive immigration policy was made possible by a consensus between the main political forces — the left Social Democratic Party and the right Liberal Party Venstre, both willing to keep in check electoral support for the radical right-wing parties (the effect of ‘contagion from the right’ in Maurice Duverger’s terms). The object of Denmark’s restrictive integration policy is migrants with a different cultural background (mainly from Muslim countries). The government takes systematic measures to restrict their access to the country. As to migrant integration, the focus has shifted to ‘hard’ assimilation of civiс democratic values, benefits linked to employment, and deportation of migrants who have committed crimes.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top