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(searched for: doi:10.1080/21670811.2015.1111768)
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Published: 23 May 2022
Journalism Practice pp 1-31; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2022.2075783

Abstract:
This paper is a systematic literature review on slow journalism, whose aim is to analyse and understand all previously done research on the subject. The review focused on four databases—Web of Science Core Collection, SCOPUS, B-ON and Communication Abstracts—and, after applying the protocol and the analysis model, a corpus of 37 papers was obtained. Data collection ended on 31 January 2022 and no starting date was defined. This analysis shows that, although the concept designation is somewhat recent it is deeply rooted in journalism, it places itself between tradition and innovation. Among other considerations, one should stress the strengthening of the connection with the audience and the idea of being an alternative way of doing, recognising, still, the need for other processes and temporalities.
El Profesional de la información, Volume 31; https://doi.org/10.3145/epi.2022.may.07

Abstract:
The aim of this work is to study slow journalism audiences, with a particular interest in Latin America, specifically Argentina, Colombia, and Mexico. Five case studies were carried out, covering Anfibia (Argentina), Arcadia (Colombia), Gatopardo (Mexico), La silla vacía (Colombia), and Letras libres (Mexico), along with a Delphi study (double round with 27 participants) and a structured questionnaire (of 1,500 people between the ages of 18 and 65 years). The results indicate that 75% of the surveyed population obtain their information from all kinds of digital media, among whom 84% use social media for this purpose. Slow journalism is still mainly unknown to a large fraction (17%) of the population, although once given its definition and some named examples, 40% of those surveyed claimed to have read the slow press at some time. Quality is the main reason for its consumption (62%), followed by searching for specific subjects (46%), especially for young people (65%) and in Colombia (52%). Experts in slow journalism agree that the key to consolidating an audience involves listening to and interacting with its members, together with their active participation in the media.
Published: 23 August 2021
Journalism Practice pp 1-18; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1969987

Abstract:
Against the relentless speed-driven nature of today’s journalism industry, the notion of a decidedly slower type of journalism seems to be gaining traction amongst both industry practitioners and audiences. In direct contradiction to the ‘breaking news’ mentality that governs most modern newsrooms (Lewis and Cushion 2009 Lewis, J., and S. Cushion. 2009. “The Thirst to be First: An Analysis of Breaking News Stories and Their Impact on the Quality of 24-Hour News Coverage in the UK.” Journalism Practice 3 (3): 304–318.[Taylor & Francis Online] , [Google Scholar]), slow journalism calls for the purposeful slowing down of news production to create an alternative form of journalism that advocates for a higher quality and depth in content (Le Masurier 2015 Le Masurier, M. 2015. “What is Slow Journalism?” Journalism Practice 9 (2): 138–152.[Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®] , [Google Scholar]). This paper aims to add to the literature on slow journalism by analysing how a particular publication, the popular literary lifestyle magazine, Kinfolk, actively pursues, portrays, and presents the practice of slow journalism. Based on a textual analysis of the editor’s letters from 30 issues of Kinfolk, this study found that the practice of slow journalism is manifested in the magazine through four ways: an emphasis on community, advocating for slowness in both production and consumption of content, and a niche editorial presentation. Findings from this study should help scholars to improve the theorising of the concept of slow journalism, and also help contribute to a better understanding of the larger changes happening in the journalism field.
, Paul Scott
Published: 20 January 2021
Journalism Practice pp 1-17; https://doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2021.1874485

Abstract:
Conceptualisation and theoretical understanding of slow journalism has developed over more than a decade in reaction to the fast-paced journalism so prevalent in contemporary, mainstream media. Articulated in 2007 by Susan Greenberg, the slow journalism movement encompasses attributes such as deep, non-sensational storytelling, transparency, participatory involvement, community service and ethical practice. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s (ABC) foray into slow journalism over the last several years via the Remote Communities Project (RCP) enables reporters to spend up to two weeks in a remote or rural community and find what the project management team call “the untold stories”. As part of a research project investigating the RCP, 15 journalists, producers and managers from the ABC were interviewed. When these participants were asked to reflect upon their understanding of slow journalism, several themes emerged: this form entails a change in practice; the importance of community engagement; and the ability to invest time in finding and developing stories. This article reports on those themes through the lens of participant reflection and Pierre Bourdieu’s cultural production model to develop a better understanding of how reporters who undertook projects for the RCP view the process of slow journalism and implications for journalistic practice.
, Paul Scott, Christina Koutsoukos
Published: 1 June 2020
Australian Journalism Review, Volume 42, pp 77-92; https://doi.org/10.1386/ajr_00020_1

Abstract:
In early 2018, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) launched a ‘slow journalism’ initiative, funded by the ABC’s Remote Communities Project (RCP). Reporters and producers from regional and local ABC radio stations were invited to pitch for funding that would facilitate up to two weeks in remote, rural and regional communities to create stories that would provide audiences with insight into life outside of metropolitan cities. The ABC labelled this project ‘slow journalism’ because the reporters were working without the time constraints highly influential in contemporary work practices associated with delivering bulletins, online updates and fast turnarounds of workflows. Through interviews undertaken with personnel involved in the initiative, including reporters, producers and ABC management, this article analyses the pilot project carried out in December 2017. The article also examines the pilot project’s influence in shaping project implementation as well as its relationship to ‘slow journalism’, as defined in previous academic studies. We contend that while the RCP contains elements commonly associated with slow journalism, it also adds to the understanding of slow journalism as both a practice and a concept by discovering characteristics specific to public broadcasting models such as that reflected by the ABC.
Kenan Duman
AJIT-e: Academic Journal of Information Technology, Volume 11, pp 24-42; https://doi.org/10.5824/ajite.2020.01.002.x

Abstract:
Bu makalenin amacı “Yavaş Gazetecilik” kavramını tanımlamak, yavaş gazeteciliğin temel özelliklerini ve uygulamalarını ortaya koymaktır. Çalışmanın ana sorusu şudur: Alternatif yavaş gazetecilik pratikleri, gazeteciliğin geleceği için ne önerebilir? Çalışma soruları dört ana başlıkta toplanmıştır: Yavaş gazetecilik, hızlı gazeteciliğe bir alternatif midir? Haber tüketicisinin derinlemesine araştırılmış, şeffaf, çok kaynaklı bir haberciliğe talebi var mıdır? Yavaş gazetecilik, giderek güvenilmez hale gelen gazetecilik mesleğine güveni artırabilir mi? Yavaş gazetecilik ekonomik bakımdan sürdürülebilir mi? Çalışmada fenomen ve öncülleri bağlamsallaştırıldıktan sonra yavaş gazeteciliğin pratikte neye benzediğini görmek için İtalya’da ‘Lora Dell Pelice’ medya kuruluşu bağlamında görüşme biçimi ile araştırılma gerçekleştirilmiştir. Örnek vakada, derginin editörü ile yapılan görüşmenin yanı sıra derginin yazılı ve çevrimiçi içerikleri incelenmiştir. Çalışmanın sonucunda çoğu yavaş gazetecilik projesinin okur odaklı olduğunu ve kendi kitlelerini yarattıkları, ilk dönem yavaş gazetecilik deneyimlerinin kendilerini hızlı gazeteciliğin yerine ya da gazeteciliğin geleceği olarak düşünmedikleri sonucuna varılmıştır. Ayrıca çalışma sonucunda yavaş gazeteciliğin hızlı haber sarmalında güvenli bir medya ortamı için bir alternatif olduğu ve ilk dönem örneklerin kısa sürede ekonomik sürdürülebilir yapı oluştursalar da ilerisi için endişeler taşıdıkları gözlemlenmiştir.
, Christopher D. Tulloch
Published: 29 September 2019
Communication & Sport, Volume 9, pp 603-624; https://doi.org/10.1177/2167479519878674

Abstract:
In a cluttered and increasingly complex environment characterized by the multiplication of platforms, a constellation of quality football print magazines has emerged as an alternative destination in sports journalism. To trace the expansion of the independent football magazine market, in-depth interviews were conducted with the editors of eight prestigious projects from seven countries: Howler (United States), Panenka and Líbero (Spain), Mundial (United Kingdom), So Foot (France), 11 Freunde (Germany), Offside (Sweden), and Ballesterer (Austria). Independent football magazines position themselves as part of a journalistic counteroffensive to the metric-driven, routinized, and complacent approach that currently shapes mainstream sports media output. In contrast to the primary orientation of sports journalism towards economic capital, their editorial philosophy is built on three core axes aimed at developing cultural capital: (1) a diverse and multifaceted football agenda that embraces unheard voices and far-reaching issues of a sociocultural, geopolitical, and economic nature; (2) the importance of dedicating time and resources to create a visually distinctive output; and (3) a deliberate emphasis on nostalgia and resistance to the seemingly endless commodification of football. As part of their creative approach, gathering and nourishing a community of readers has been fundamental to the growth and sustainability of those projects.
, Josep Lluís Micó Sanz,
Published: 1 December 2018
by SciELO
Transinformação, Volume 30, pp 299-313; https://doi.org/10.1590/2318-08892018000300003

Abstract:
Resumen Descubrir el éxito de la combinación entre tradición e innovación. Este es el propósito del presente artículo, dedicado a analizar las claves del periodismo narrativo en el entorno digital a partir de los modelos de las revistas Jot Down y Gatopardo. Ante la inmediatez de la digitalización, los medios dedicados al periodismo narrativo rompen con las normas del espacio online y apuestan por el periodismo slow, basado en las técnicas tradicionales de los padres de este periodismo, como Tom Wolfe. Se estudian sus contenidos, técnicas, formatos y se examina cómo un periodismo centrado en la esencia del papel está disfrutando de una consolidada presencia y audiencia en el mundo digital. Al mismo tiempo, la propuesta es conocer la situación y reconocimiento de los periodistas en este tipo de medios; sus rutinas, procesos y condiciones laborales. Para ello se emplea una metodología basada en entrevistas en profundidad, análisis de contenido, observación no participante y revisión de la literatura. Las principales conclusiones muestran que, ante la situación actual del periodismo y de los medios de comunicación, priorizar la calidad a la inmediatez e hibridar la tradición con la innovación puede ser clave como garantía de futuro.
Doxa Comunicación. Revista Interdisciplinar de Estudios de Comunicación y Ciencias Sociales pp 129-148; https://doi.org/10.31921/doxacom.n25a6

Abstract:
El slow journalism surge como respuesta a la sobrecarga informativa generada por la aceleración del ciclo de producción de noticias en una era digital marcada por la aparición de nuevos operadores (redes sociales, agregadores de noticias). El estudio de casos practicado y la reflexión sobre la función que el “periodismo lento” debe ejercer en la actualidad indican que este sigue siendo útil para mejorar la calidad de los productos informativos. Por otra parte, se confirma la existencia de una demanda en alza de contenidos multimedia que analicen los hechos informativos en profundidad. Estas necesidades están siendo cubiertas por empresas informativas independientes de los grandes medios, más interesados en rentabilizar otros mercados de demanda masiva como las noticias breves de actualidad.
Published: 4 January 2017
Digital Journalism, Volume 5, pp 652-672; https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2016.1263159

Abstract:
The consolidation of the counter genre that is long-form sports journalism (LFSJ) is of growing interest to the sports media researcher. In order to trace its expansion across the sports journalism landscape, this article offers a comparative transatlantic case study featuring the entire collection of long-form stories developed by two prestigious publications: the American magazine Sports Illustrated (SI Longform) and the French sports daily L’Équipe (L’Équipe Explore). The study considers the slow journalism heritage of LFSJ and its challenge to established Web interface theology while exploring key issues such as the sports agenda, sourcing and the use of immersive multimedia formats, aimed at improving the sporting culture of its users. The article concludes by considering the pivotal role of LFSJ in the brand-building strategies of the media outlets themselves.
Published: 19 April 2016
Digital Journalism, Volume 5, pp 420-442; https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2016.1169197

Abstract:
Digital longform journalism has recently attracted increased attention among both academics and professionals. This study contributes to the growing body of research by dissecting the multimodal structure of digital longform journalism, that is, how the emerging genre combines written language, photography, short videos, maps and other graphical elements, and joins them together into a seamless narrative using subtle transitions. The data consist of 12 longform articles published in 2012–2013, which have been annotated for their visual and verbal content, their underlying principle of organization and the transitions that hold between them. The annotation is stored into a digital corpus, which is then analyzed to examine the multimodal structures that enable the longform genre to establish a narrative, and to explicate how the longform attempts to captivate its audience by creating a distraction-free environment.
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