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(searched for: doi:10.1177/0899764015583314)
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Jing Chen, Chengliang Wang,
Published: 3 June 2022
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2022.883150

Abstract:
Volunteers play an indispensable role in several major events and activities. The purpose of this study is to review studies on volunteer motivation from 2000 to 2021 and to discover the development trends in this field. The Web of Science Core Collection is the main literature data resource, from which 162 papers on volunteer motivation published in the SSCI were selected. Using two visualization analysis tools, CiteSpace and VOSviewer, this study conducts bibliometric analysis and systematic review from multiple dimensions, identifying the authors, countries, institutions, and journals with high productivity in this field. Additionally, we explored highly cited papers, authors, and journals in this field. This study aims to find the research hotspots and theoretical basis through co-occurrence analysis and cluster analysis of keywords and explore the evolution through the time zone map drawn with CiteSpace. Moreover, we focus on the influence of Chinese and Western cultures (represented by China and the United States) on volunteer motivation. It was found that Chinese volunteers were more affected by collectivism, whereas American volunteers were more affected by individualism. The conclusion of this study constructs a clear framework for research on volunteer motivation, which provides researchers with a deeper and thorough understanding of the connotation of volunteer motivation, providing guidance and support for future research in this field.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182413229

Abstract:
Based on the self-determination theory (SDT), this study used a mixed-methods (i.e., quantitative and qualitative approaches) design to explore the role of basic psychological need satisfaction (BPNS) played in sustained volunteering. Quantitative analysis of 803 college student volunteers revealed that competence and relatedness need satisfaction had significant associations with sustained volunteering, while autonomy need satisfaction did not. Furthermore, latent profile analyses identified five profiles of BPNS: low (Profile 1), relatively low (Profile 2), moderate (Profile 3), low autonomy-high competence and relatedness (Profile 4), and high (Profile 5). Volunteers in Profile 4 and Profile 5 reported higher sustained volunteering than those in other profiles. Subsequent qualitative synthesis of interview data from 33 college student volunteers found that competence need satisfaction (45.58%) was mentioned most frequently among the factors promoting sustained volunteering, then followed by relatedness (27.43%) and autonomy need satisfaction (11.06%). These findings highlight the important role of BPNS, especially competence and relatedness need satisfaction, in promoting college students’ long-term volunteering.
Sára Forgács-Fábián
Published: 6 August 2021
Abstract:
Jelen tanulmány célja az Y-generációhoz tartozó egyetemisták önkéntes szervezetekben való megtartásának vizsgálata egy olyan nonprofit szervezet (az Amigos a gyerekekért Alapítvány) esettanulmányán keresztül, mely szervezetben átlagosan 20 hónapig aktívak az önkéntesek. A cikk kutatási kérdése, hogy mely szervezeti tényezők motiválhatják az Y-generációs egyetemista önkénteseket az egy évnél hosszabb idejű önkéntes munkájuk fenntartására. A tanulmány egyik legfontosabb megállapítása az, hogy az Y-generációs egyetemista önkéntesek számára fontos a szervezeti értékek és keretek minősége, vagyis maga a szervezet, amelyben önkéntes tevékenységüket végzik. Vizsgálatom szempontjából kiemelkedő tényező és megtartó erő számukra a közösség. Az önkéntes szervezetekre nézve valid feltételezés lehet, hogy az önkéntesek az „x óra” direkt segítségnyújtáson felül nem érdekeltek a szervezet további fejlesztésében, hiszen szabadidejükben, limitált időintervallumban foglalkoznak egy társadalmilag hasznos „üggyel”, ellentétben az ugyanazon szervezetnél teljes munkaidőben foglalkoztatottakkal. Ezt a feltételezést cáfolja a jelen tanulmány, illetve az elvégzett kutatás, mely szerint a szervezeti rugalmasság, a lapos szervezeti struktúra, a döntéshozatali mechanizmusokba történő bevonódási lehetőség, az önállóság biztosítása és a felelősségvállalás rendszere mind olyan tényezők, amelyek hozzájárulnak az Y-generációs egyetemista önkéntesek hosszabb távú megtartásához, ezáltal a szervezeti stabilitás jelentős növeléséhez.
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, Volume 65, pp 45-62; https://doi.org/10.1080/01634372.2021.1923605

Abstract:
Population aging and resource constraints in aged care indicate an ever increasing need for volunteers in this growing sector. Volunteers in aged care have different expectations and experiences, as they typically form longer and closer relationships with residents, and perform important social support functions that may otherwise not be delivered. Tailored strategies to recruit and retain these volunteers are needed. The aims of this review were to identify the motivations and expectations of aged care volunteers, and to examine strategies that foster their recruitment, retention and role satisfaction. A systematic review of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase and Cochrane Library was conducted. Selection criteria included qualitative and quantitative studies published in English, with no date restrictions. Volunteering roles were restricted to residential aged care services. The 18 studies eligible for review presented consistently strong themes across volunteer motivation, recruitment/retention, and satisfaction/involvement. Implications for policy and practice relate to the importance of setting clear role expectations, matching volunteers’ skills with roles, ongoing training and support, and the need for operational frameworks that support volunteers with administrative processes, communication and complaint resolution. Improved volunteer management that enables the consistent provision of social support in this setting stands to improve residents’ quality of life.
International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing, Volume 18, pp 575-597; https://doi.org/10.1007/s12208-021-00284-5

Abstract:
This study aims to analyze the effects of ideal and actual self-congruence and functional congruence on the volunteering intentions of university students. The empirical analysis is based on a sample of 735 students from universities in southwestern Germany. The current paper shows that stereotypic image perceptions (i.e., perceived warmth and competence) represent antecedents of the considered congruence constructs. Moreover, the study shows that actual self-congruence and functional congruence mediate the effect of perceived warmth and competence on the intention to volunteer. Ideal self-congruence did not mediate the effect of stereotypical image perceptions, nor did it have a direct effect on the willingness to take voluntary action. The study offers practical recommendations for nonprofit organizations, as well as avenues for future research based on its empirical findings.
Maria Luisa Giancaspro,
Published: 1 March 2021
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.574232

Abstract:
Over the last decades, consistent research showed that voluntary work could be considered as a tool for professional development and concrete employment: volunteering could be either experienced as a desire to improve career opportunities or to acquire new skills. The study aimed to investigate voluntary work as a context of informal and non-formal workplace learning and vocational guidance, useful to develop skills and abilities, namely the capital of personal and social resources, that could promote future employability. Participants were 38 young volunteers who experienced the Universal Civil Service, a national Italian program addressed to young people aged up to 28 years, giving them both the opportunity to engage in social activities useful for the community and have the first contact with a working context. In line with the objectives of the study, participants were invited to describe their volunteering experience in a diary, highlighting if and to what extent this context contributed to enhancing their employability capital, namely the asset of skills, knowledge, and networks acquired, that they could transfer to a future professional domain. The narrative data collected were examined through diatextual analysis, a specific address of discourse analysis designed to catch the relationship between enunciators, text, and context of the talk. This qualitative analysis allowed us to investigate the meanings young people attributed to these activities. In light of these results, the paper contributed to investigate volunteers’ perceptions about the conditions that could best foster this specific kind of workplace informal and non-formal learning and at proposing a qualitative perspective on the analysis of the employability capital they developed.
Yi Zhao, , Eunsung Yoon
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 51, pp 5-30; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764021989445

Abstract:
The article reviews a family of multilevel models that can be used to build general theories of the nonprofit sector that are still sensitive to variations in context. The comparative study of the nonprofit (or nongovernmental) sector presents formidable challenges to social scientists who are attempting to advance theory on the sector. Ostensibly, the goal is to model and test theories that are generalizable. Yet, as scholars study topics such as volunteerism, donations, governance, management, advocacy, accountability, and the like in different political, economic, and cultural contexts, they often find different patterns across cases. After reviewing the issues and introducing the idea that time (or more specifically events) can be thought of as context as well, we present an analytical approach for doing comparative research using the framework of hierarchical linear modeling.
David M. Markowitz, Brittany Shoots-Reinhard, Ellen Peters, Michael C. Silverstein, Raleigh Goodwin, Pär Bjälkebring
Published: 11 February 2021
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.634543

Abstract:
Communities often unite during a crisis, though some cope by ascribing blame or stigmas to those who might be linked to distressing life events. In a preregistered two-wave survey, we evaluated the dehumanization of Asians and Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our first wave (March 26–April 2, 2020; N = 917) revealed dehumanization was prevalent, between 6.1% and 39% of our sample depending on measurement. Compared to non-dehumanizers, people who dehumanized also perceived the virus as less risky to human health and caused less severe consequences for infected people. They were more likely to be ideologically Conservative and believe in conspiracy theories about the virus. We largely replicated the results 1 month later in our second wave (May 6–May 13, 2020; N = 723). Together, many Americans dehumanize Asians and Asian Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic with related perceptions that the virus is less problematic. Implications and applications for dehumanization theory are discussed.
Published: 21 August 2020
by MDPI
Sustainability, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176802

Abstract:
This study examined factors that contribute to the commitment of volunteers’ environmental stewardship through motivations, satisfaction, and generativity. Generativity, a focus on the next generation, has not been examined in the content of environmental stewardship. Volunteers for the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department (TPWD) were surveyed online from May to September of 2016 (n = 1111). Through structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis, our findings validated six categories of motivations (helping the environment, project organization, values, learning, career, and social), four dimensions of satisfaction (organizational support, project organization, sense of empowerment, and group integration), and two factors of commitment (affective commitment and normative commitment). Our findings showed positive and significant path correlations for four latent variables (motivations, satisfaction, commitment, and generativity). This study contributes to the literature by showing the potential for generativity to contribute to environmental stewardship, and by enhancing stewardship efforts for agencies and organizations in recruiting and engaging volunteers.
Published: 30 June 2020
Frontiers in Psychology, Volume 11; https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.01542

Abstract:
This article contributes to the literature on the roots of Public Service Motivation (PSM) by turning to the psychological theory of basic human motives. The study explores the differential associations of explicit and implicit basic human motives with PSM, Attraction to Policy-Making (APM), Commitment to the Public Interest (CPI), Compassion (COM), and Self-Sacrifice (SS). Methodologically, the research contributes to the literature by introducing a measurement instrument new to Public Administration: the Brief Implicit Association Test (BIAT). The BIAT is an easy-to-use and flexible tool to probe into the human unconsciousness, offering ample opportunities for further research in Public Administration and Management.
, , , , Shiyi Kong, Zhengyong Jiang
Journal of Social Service Research, Volume 47, pp 276-291; https://doi.org/10.1080/01488376.2020.1758867

Abstract:
The promotion and development of sustainable volunteerism is crucial for quality social services. Previous studies on the relationship between social trust and volunteering is mixed and inclusive. This article aims to investigate the effects of the particularized trust, generalized trust, trust differential (i.e., difference in levels between particularized and generalized trust) and radius of trust (i.e., difference in levels between in-group trust and out-group trust), on volunteering. By interviewing 1,170 Hong Kong Chinese in a territory-wide randomized household survey, this article reveals that generalized trust facilitates volunteering, whereas particularized trust exhibits an inverse effect. The radius of trust could not facilitate voluntary participation. This article distinguishes between the reverse contributions of generalized and particularized trust among Hong Kong Chinese, thereby providing a clear and precise explanation for social trust-volunteering relationships. Future research should focus on the conceptualization and operationalization of radius of trust and cross-cultural comparative studies on the effects of particularized and generalized trust using longitudinal data.
, , Christian Nitzl,
Published: 2 April 2020
Public Management Review, Volume 22, pp 974-998; https://doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2020.1740305

Abstract:
This study raises the important question of how public service motivation and prosocial motivation are related to one another and how, together, these two concepts affect behavioural outcomes of public employees. Based on a sample of 747 public employees and using partial least squares structural equation model, we analyse the relationships between public service motivation, prosocial motivation, and different behavioural outcome variables in a single model simultaneously. Our study shows that public service motivation and prosocial motivation are not only theoretically, but also empirically distinct concepts. This has important implications for the use of these concepts, as will be discussed.
Petia Genkova
Published: 11 October 2019
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Social & Cultural Geography, Volume 22, pp 807-827; https://doi.org/10.1080/14649365.2019.1633685

Abstract:
This paper responds to the question of how volunteers persist in volunteering. The geographies of voluntarism have explored patterns and motivations for volunteering, but a gap remains to understand how people persist in volunteering. This gap is crucial to address if voluntary sector projects are to be sustainable by retaining volunteers. This paper questions how volunteers persist in volunteering in a faith-based context through volunteers’ narratives from a church food poverty project ‘Lunch’. It contributes to two key agendas in the geographies of religion – faith as performed in people’s daily lives and faith-based organisations – because volunteering was a way for Lunch volunteers to act out their faith. To understand Lunch volunteers’ persistence, this paper utilises affect theory to draw out from their faith-based narratives how volunteers are affected by their experiences; how volunteering could mean more to volunteers than what was represented; and how fleeting moments could be as significant as ongoing experiences. Overall, bringing the geographies of religion and voluntarism together, this paper argues that persistence in volunteering is a continual process of motivation, action and reflection in which factors from the past, present and anticipated future feed into volunteers’ motivations to persist in volunteering or not.
, , Ian Yeoman
Published: 19 July 2018
Tourism Management, Volume 69, pp 596-604; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2018.03.019

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Elaine Suk-Ching Liu
Published: 13 November 2017
Career Development International, Volume 22, pp 754-771; https://doi.org/10.1108/cdi-12-2016-0236

Abstract:
Purpose: Encouraging college students to volunteer is a supposed but uncharted way to contribute to their career commitment. Clarifying the ways of the contribution is therefore necessary. From the social capital perspective, volunteering and network density among friends represent social capital to reinforce each other. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to study the enhancement of the contribution by the density. Design/methodology/approach: The examination employs a two-wave panel survey of 410 university students to estimate the effects of volunteering and friend network density at Wave 1 on career commitment at Wave 2. Essentially, the examination adjusted for biases due to sample attrition and self-selection into volunteering. Findings: Volunteering at Wave 1 showed a significant contribution to career commitment at Wave 2. Moreover, the contribution significantly increased with friend network density at Wave 1. Research limitations/implications: Findings from this panel survey of university students in Hong Kong require future research for substantiation. For instance, such research can apply an experimental design to volunteering to guarantee the internal validity of the contribution of volunteering. Practical implications: Social capital theory is applicable to the promotion of career commitment. Specifically, optimizing the strength of social capital through the combination of volunteering and friendship is promising. Originality/value: Empirical support for the application of social capital theory to career development is evident. Particularly, the joint contribution of volunteering and friendship is demonstrable.
, Carmen Marcuello, Isabel Saz-Gil
Published: 1 February 2017
Cross-Cultural Research, Volume 51, pp 464-490; https://doi.org/10.1177/1069397117694135

Abstract:
The main goal of this article is to explore the role of individual sociodemographic characteristics and national social backgrounds in forming people’s decisions to engage in voluntary work. We have drawn data from the European Value Survey (1990, 1999, and 2008). We analyze voluntary work as an aggregate measure and also through four different categories. We have performed multilevel regression models taking into account a hierarchical structure of two levels: individual and country. There are no relevant gender and age differences, and, in fact, the most important differences lie in the impact of social factors rather than individual characteristics. We also highlight that geographical effects are diluted after controlling for social factors, but a certain level of geographical variance remains unclarified by the explanatory variables. This conclusion has important policy implications because it opens the door to implementing social policies that could be effective for all European countries.
K.A. Palkin
Psychological-Educational Studies, Volume 9, pp 99-107; https://doi.org/10.17759/psyedu.2017090410

Abstract:
The article discusses the most common in the world fields of study of the factors that, according to scientists, in varying degrees, are able to influence the participation of people in volunteer activities. The review running characteristic of such research areas as the theory of "human resources" and related theories of democratization, the welfare state, social background; theory of individual personality characteristics of volunteers; attachment theory; identity theory; motivational theories, etc. The focus is psychological components of the personality of the individual, which presumably can be the most important predictors of volunteering. The analysis of a number of studies, made by reputable foreign authors devoted to identifying key determinants of participation in volunteer activities, allows to select among the topical areas one of the most promising – a comprehensive study of psychological characteristics of personality with the goal of creating the most accurate representation of the collective identity of the modern volunteer.
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 46, pp 549-566; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764016660385

Abstract:
Community theaters proliferate in every state in the nation, yet they are rarely considered in civil society research. Participation in civil society is capable of producing individual (psychological empowerment) and community-level outcomes, yet less is known about how community theaters might be capable of producing the same. Guided by the empirically tested dimensions of intra-organizational empowerment, this qualitative study interrogates four internal processes of voluntary membership in a community theater (shared beliefs, opportunity role structure, social support, and leadership). Directed content analysis of 14 in-depth interviews support and extend our understanding of existing theory for this less examined population. Implications for policy, practice, and future research are discussed.
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