Refine Search

New Search

Results: 5

(searched for: doi:10.5204/intjfyhe.v6i1.248)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Pete Singer
Handbook of Interpersonal Violence and Abuse Across the Lifespan pp 1661-1688; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-89999-2_296

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Pete Singer
Handbook of Interpersonal Violence and Abuse Across the Lifespan pp 1-28; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-62122-7_296-1

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy, Volume 8, pp 131-149; https://doi.org/10.1080/21507686.2017.1348369

Abstract:
This research project describes a phenomenological study exploring the hope experiences of young adults who have gone through the journey from academic failure to success. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with eight participants from low-functioning families. By using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, the researchers identified four primary themes representing the hope experience and meaning in the participants’ life situation: (a) adverse conditions, (b) motivation of interest, (c) positive thoughts and (d) relationship support. The findings support and contribute new aspects to the knowledge of hope study. The results highlight ‘positive thoughts and relationship support’ as the integral part of the phenomenon of hope. It suggests that college counsellors should assess the availability of perceived positive thoughts and relationship support in order to design tailor-made programmes for the young adults. College counsellor and academic staff may collaborate on curriculum design through which teacher can use classroom activities to promote students’ hopeful thinking. College counsellor can play an important role in developing hope within the classroom.
Published: 3 April 2017
Irish Educational Studies, Volume 36, pp 1-19; https://doi.org/10.1080/03323315.2017.1327362

Abstract:
This grounded theory study examined prospective teachers’ (PTs) dispositional hopes, teaching-specific hopes, their sources, and motivational force of teaching-specific hopes. A total of 41 PTs enrolled on different teacher education programmes voluntarily participated in the semi-structured interviews. Findings showed that PTs’ dispositional hopes revolved around an active/passive axis, and originated from internal, external, and combined sources. Teaching-specific hopes were explained through five categories: relationships with others, teaching, student achievement, student motivation, and student development. Regardless of axis or source, teaching-specific hopes had a substantial motivational force on PTs’ preparation toward their future careers. The current study urges teacher educators and policy-makers to consider PTs’ teaching-specific hopes together with their motivational roles in preparing them for their future careers.
, Glenn J. Harrison
Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice, Volume 20, pp 176-196; https://doi.org/10.1177/1521025116654162

Abstract:
The James Cook University (JCU) Biomedical Science students struggle with their first year and “second-choice-syndrome” as evidenced by high inter-degree transfer rates and low primary degree completions despite the cohort having high subject or unit grade point averages. This project evaluated the impact of two extracurricular support initiatives (email newsletters and themed luncheons) to deliver just-in-time information and support on student engagement and success. Students and academics rated the initiatives highly with positive support themes of networking, collegiality, belonging and engagement; there was no direct improvement in subject grades or degree satisfaction metrics. However, there was an increase in degree, college, and university student retention. It is becoming increasingly important to recognize and separate the classic academic measures of grades as an indication of success and that more personal or social support is required for students to thrive regardless of cohort demographics or career path. A student’s initial experience on campus is important and influences students’ persistence in higher education and their believed capabilities.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top