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(searched for: doi:10.1111/apce.12067)
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Published: 20 January 2022
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 52, pp 196-221; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211067519

Abstract:
A board interlock creates interorganizational networks where organizations are interconnected via overlapping board of directors. Board interlock is important for nonprofits because of its potential to impact organizational performance through the flow of information, resources, and status. While much is known about the consequences of board interlock, little is known about the mechanisms underlying its antecedents. This study explores three types of predictors of board interlock: organizational, dyadic, and structural characteristics. Inferential network analysis of a 17-year-period panel of nonprofits demonstrates that network relationships are shaped by the existing network structures, such as the tendency for preferential attachment (e.g., a social preference to connect with those who are already well connected) and transitivity (e.g., a social preference to connect with friends of friends). Findings inform nonprofit leaders about how to bridge to a board interlock network by recruiting well-connected board members serving on multiple boards.
Published: 28 November 2021
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 51, pp 1074-1094; https://doi.org/10.1177/08997640211057452

Abstract:
Previous research lags behind in illuminating theoretical mechanisms that shape governance decision-making on board practices. Using an integrated theoretical approach, I examine how board interlock network and institutional factors are associated with board governance policy adoption in nonprofit organizations. A linear regression model is employed to investigate policies adopted by a panel of public charities in three cities in Upstate New York during 2008 and 2014. Results show that not only the presence of board interlock networks but also central network positions relate to extensive policy adoption. Results also reveal that the use of paid professionals in management relates to institutional isomorphism reflected by more extensive governance policy adoption. These results provide insights for nonprofit leaders seeking to facilitate good governance practices by paying attention to board members’ affiliations and institutional environment considerations.
Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and Its Applications, Volume 581; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physa.2021.126212

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Yan Wu, , Yutao Chen
Published: 9 November 2020
Journal of Chinese Governance, Volume 6, pp 43-57; https://doi.org/10.1080/23812346.2020.1841483

Abstract:
Using the data of Chinese foundations, this research analyses the relationship between board interlocking network centrality and the performance of Chinese foundations. The result shows that the closeness centrality has a positive impact on their income and public welfare expenditure. In addition, the effect of closeness centrality is strengthened in non-public fund-raising foundations. However, degree and betweenness centrality have no effect on their performance. These findings demonstrate that board interlocking networks play an undoubtedly important role, and that foundations should actively establish and expand board interlocking networks to access all kinds of resources, achieve complementary advantages, and thus enhance their organizational capacity and performance.
, Bryce Hannibal, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson
Published: 20 January 2020
Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Volume 49, pp 734-756; https://doi.org/10.1177/0899764019897845

Abstract:
Do interlocking boards provide advantage in the grants marketplace? Drawing upon board data from nine public grant-making organizations in two metropolitan areas and their grant recipients, we test the mediating and moderating relationships between interlocking boards, organizational size, and the size of the grants received. We find that organizational size is not a predictor of grant allocations independent of network characteristics. Larger organizations have larger and better-connected boards, which is associated with larger grants.
, Fredrik O. Andersson, , David O. Renz
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, Volume 28, pp 1422-1447; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11266-016-9683-6

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