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(searched for: doi:10.1111/jan.12469)
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Published: 30 March 2020
BMC Public Health, Volume 20, pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-08568-x

Abstract:
Background: Depression is a major risk factor for the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular disease. A transtheoretical model-based intervention and motivational interviewing have been used to change health risk behaviors and have demonstrated positive effects. To our knowledge, no studies of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) have used a transtheoretical model-based intervention and motivational interviewing as an intervention to provide dynamic education. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of the transtheoretical model-based intervention and motivational interviewing on the management of depression in hospitalized patients with CHD. Method: A randomized controlled trial was designed. A total of 110 participants were randomly divided into an intervention group (n = 55) and a control group (n = 55). The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Depression Prevention & Management Survey items (stages of change, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, process of change and self-efficacy) were used to collect data at all time points. Analysis of covariance, chi-square test and repeated measures analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results: After the intervention, there were more positive changes in stages of change, higher scores for the cognitive and behavioral levels, the perceived benefits, and self-efficacy, and lower perceived barriers and depression in the intervention group than in the control group. Finally, there were statistically significant differences in the depression scores at different time points in the intervention group (F = 17.814, p = 0.000 < 0.01). Conclusions: The study showed that a transtheoretical model-based intervention and motivational interviewing exert positive effects on the management of depression in hospitalized patients with CHD. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT03953924 (Date assigned: 16/5/2019). Retrospectively registered.
Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Volume 38, pp 717-725; https://doi.org/10.1080/01612840.2017.1330909

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of the lived experience of lifestyle changes as perceived by people with severe mental illness (SMI). People with SMI who have experience in managing lifestyle changes were interviewed (n = 10). The interviews were analyzed with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. The findings reveal three themes: (1) struggling with inner and outer limitations, (2) on one's own but together with others and (3) longing for living a life in harmony. The meaning of lifestyle changes can be understood as a person's internal and external endeavors to make well-considered decisions about lifestyle changes. Support should focus on strengthening the person's self-efficacy and should be based on the person's experiences.
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