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(searched for: doi:10.7227/ercw.4.1.3)
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Published: 15 November 2019
Feminist Media Studies, Volume 21, pp 1010-1027; https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2019.1690021

Abstract:
Following a number of high-profile cases in UK towns such as Rochdale, Oxford and Rotherham, there has been a surge of interest and commentary about the sexual exploitation of children and young people in media, political and academic forums. An extensive research base dating back to the 1980s shows that, despite this renewed interest, child sexual exploitation is not a new problem, nor is it one new to media outlets and audiences. Sexual exploitation was established as policy concern in England in 2000 after publication of the first government guidance titled “Safeguarding Children Involved in Prostitution” following campaigns by leading children’s charities in the UK. This article uses frame analysis to identify news-media discourses about sexual exploitation of children and young people in two time periods (1997–99 & 2014–15), using a dataset drawn from three national newspapers. The analysis shows how discourses about young women have changed: from the sexualisation of young women in period one to framing young women more explicitly as “vulnerable” and victimised in period two. It reveals a change in the media’s focus on perpetrators, from their relative invisibility in period one to a racialised “media template” in period two.
Published: 22 December 2017
Practical Theology, Volume 11, pp 54-66; https://doi.org/10.1080/1756073x.2017.1414483

Abstract:
This article draws on Jesus’ critique of holiness as purity to build a Christian theological challenge to unjust twenty-first-century surveillance. Categorical suspicion is directed against populations deemed to be risky. The Temple of Ezekiel’s prophecy is set alongside the contemporary airport. Using the analogy of the management of the flows of people into and through sterile spaces, it is argued that purity paradigms have a functional equivalent in the twenty-first-century attempt to control a chaotic world through surveillance by social sorting. The importance of scrutinising those with the power to name categories and the dispersal of notions of ‘risky persons’ into broader social imagination form one direction of critique. The church is challenged as to its reinforcing of unjust stereotypes, particularly of Muslims, and the call of compassion to reach over boundaries, without ignoring the existence of actual dangerous people.
Muslim Students, Education and Neoliberalism pp 115-130; https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-56921-9_8

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