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(searched for: doi:10.1162/adev_a_00025)
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, John Rosso, Daniel Felipe Fragua
International Journal of the Economics of Business pp 1-33; doi:10.1080/13571516.2020.1783938

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Published: 1 March 2020
World Development, Volume 127; doi:10.1016/j.worlddev.2019.104747

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, Rosa Forte
International Advances in Economic Research, Volume 25, pp 323-337; doi:10.1007/s11294-019-09744-5

, André Pineli
Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Volume 46, pp 1-24; doi:10.1007/s40812-018-0104-2

Abstract:
We summarize the key empirical evidence on the nexus between MNEs and development, focusing on issues that are relevant for the formulation, implementation and assessment of policies by host developing countries. We also delve into what we do not know, as well as topics for which the evidence is still quite blurred. We discuss the reasons for the absence of clear evidence, and potential avenues for future research to improve policies. Although most countries rely on MNEs/FDI as a central plank of their development strategy, the collective weight of academic research has not led to a fine-tuning of policy implementation. Countries still rely on policies for which evidence is sparse, or no longer valid in an era of globalisation. Much of the literature has focused on externalities and spillovers, and has deemphasised the other ‘effects’ of MNE activity, implicitly assuming that MNEs are almost always beneficial for development. Few rents are costless when the opportunity costs of scarce resources are considered, especially in the longer term. Despite the abundance of empirical studies (of increasing sophistication), most ignore the significance of structural change. Growth and the interaction with MNE activity is not linear or monotonic over time, because the economy itself is in a constant state of flux.
Barbara Stallings, Eun Mee Kim
Promoting Development pp 203-222; doi:10.1007/978-981-10-3165-6_6

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Holger Ggrg, Aoife Hanley, , Adnan Seric
Published: 1 January 2016
SSRN Electronic Journal; doi:10.2139/ssrn.2727128

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Hyun Gyu Kim
Journal of the Korea Industrial Information System Society, Volume 20, pp 67-78; doi:10.9723/jksiis.2015.20.6.067

Complex Networks & Their Applications IX pp 603-619; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-27284-9_39

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The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Volume 25, pp 240-265; doi:10.1080/09638199.2015.1049198

Abstract:
We address the impact of multinationals on host country market structure through reviewing existing empirical literature. Our main conclusion is that the majority of studies focus on samples of manufacturing industries/firms, neglecting the service sector, despite its importance. Future research should be directed to this sector and explore the possibility of bidirectional causality between foreign presence and host country industry concentration. Studies concerning the impact of multinationals on entry, exit and survival of host country firms must use more recent data, investigate the role of vertical linkages and taking into account other control variables that may affect the exit rate. Finally, future work should take into account the mode of foreign firm establishment in the host country.
Cheryl Xiaoning Long, , Hirotaka Miura
Published: 1 September 2014
Asian Development Review, Volume 31, pp 77-108; doi:10.1162/adev_a_00036

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