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(searched for: doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2013.683)
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, Matteo Malgaroli, Gabriella Riley, Carly D. Miron, Rebecca Suzuki, Jae Hyung Park, Jane Rosenthal, Abraham Chachoua, Marleen Meyers, Naomi M. Simon
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Volume 188, pp 317-325; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-021-06279-4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Nicholas Kendell Ms, Alan J. Christensen, Timothy A. Thomsen, Michaela Gist,
Published: 23 May 2020
Head & Neck, Volume 42, pp 2431-2439; https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.26265

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, Victoria M. Villaflor, Carole Fakhry, Matthew C. Miller, Kelly M. Malloy
Published: 10 January 2020
Head & Neck, Volume 42, pp 939-944; https://doi.org/10.1002/hed.26066

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, Claire E. Wakefield, Richard J. Cohn, Joanna E. Fardell, Mary‐Ellen E. Brierley, Emily Kothe, Paul B. Jacobsen, Kate Hetherington, Rebecca Mercieca-Bebber
Published: 25 October 2019
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, , Lizbeth Kenny, Louisa G Gordon, Bryan Burmeister, , Alexandra L McCarthy, Chris Perry, , Alana Paviour, et al.
Published: 2 April 2019
Supportive Care in Cancer, Volume 27, pp 4627-4637; https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-019-04748-7

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, Sarah Raskin, Yuqing Zhang, Gema Lane, Alexandra Zizzi,
Published: 14 June 2018
Journal of Cancer Education, Volume 34, pp 614-622; https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-018-1374-0

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, Katherine Ramos, Callie Berkowitz, Julie J. Miller, , Bridget F. Koontz, , D. Hutch Allen, Jennifer A. Tenhover, Hayden B. Bosworth
Published: 10 March 2018
Journal of Cancer Education, Volume 34, pp 584-591; https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-018-1345-5

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, Julie Armin, , Leila Ali-Akbarian
Published: 13 January 2018
Journal of Cancer Survivorship, Volume 12, pp 334-347; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-017-0673-5

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Jeannine Brant, Karyl Blaseg, Kathy Aders, Dona Oliver, Evan Gray, William Dudley
Oncology Nursing Forum, Volume 43, pp 710-719; https://doi.org/10.1188/16.onf.710-719

Abstract:
To examine symptom and quality-of-life (QOL) trajectories in breast cancer and lymphoma survivors enrolled in a survivorship navigation intervention and to explore patient, caregiver, and primary care provider (PCP) satisfaction with receipt of a survivorship care plan (SCP). . Prospective, cohort, longitudinal. . The Billings Clinic, an integrated cancer center in Montana. . 67 patients with breast cancer or lymphoma who recently completed cancer treatment, along with 39 of their caregivers and 23 PCPs. . Data collection at one, three, and six months by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General and satisfaction surveys. . Symptoms, QOL, and satisfaction with the survivorship navigator and the SCP. . Symptoms persisted six months following treatment. Symptoms and QOL indicators with worst intensity were energy, sleep, coping, and satisfaction with sex life. Patients with more comorbidities reported worse QOL, telephoned the survivorship navigator more often, and were more satisfied with the SCP. Patients with lymphoma reported higher QOL, but it was not significantly different from patients with breast cancer. Patients were significantly more satisfied than caregivers with the SCP at time 1. PCPs were highly satisfied with the SCP. . Some symptoms persist, even when cancer treatment has ended. Patients with comorbidities are at higher risk for more severe symptoms and worse QOL and may benefit from ongoing support. SCPs can facilitate patients' transition to primary care following cancer treatment. . Healthcare professionals who care for breast cancer survivors need to routinely assess them for the presence of comorbid conditions. Obese breast cancer survivors may benefit from weight reduction interventions to possibly decrease their risk of developing lymphedema and improve their overall health status.
Matthew C. Miller, Andrew G. Shuman, for the American Head and Neck Society’s Committee on Survivorship
JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery, Volume 142, pp 1002-1008; https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaoto.2016.1615

Abstract:
Survivors of cancer and cancer-directed therapies may encounter substantial medical, psychosocial, interpersonal, financial, and functional consequences. The collective experience of being a cancer survivor has been dubbedsurvivorship. As a unique discipline, cancer survivorship has garnered much attention in recent years. However, its constructs have yet to be formally introduced or applied to head and neck oncology. Recognizing this, the American Head and Neck Society (AHNS) has convened a committee on survivorship. The concept of survivorship is reviewed and placed into historical perspective to identify current gaps in head and neck survivor care and to provide a roadmap for future initiatives in survivorship care and research.
, Veronique Wan Fook Cheung,
Hematology/Oncology Clinics of North America, Volume 29, pp 1159-1168; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hoc.2015.07.010

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, Sarah A. Birken, Devon K. Check Ba, Ronald C. Chen
Published: 23 September 2014
Cancer, Volume 121, pp 978-996; https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.28884

Abstract:
In 2006, the Institute of Medicine recommended that cancer survivors who are completing primary treatment receive a survivorship care plan (SCP) based on face validity. The state of scientific knowledge regarding the SCP is unclear. The authors conducted an integrative review of existing evidence regarding SCPs. The MEDLINE/PubMed database, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) database were searched for relevant studies published between 2006 and 2013 using a combination of keywords: “survivors,” “survivorship,” “care plans,” “care planning,” “treatment summaries,” and “cancer.” Articles were included if they 1) reported results from an empirical study, 2) included cancer survivors who were diagnosed at age ≥18 years, 3) related to SCP, and 4) were published in English. In total, 781 records were retrieved; 77 were identified as duplicates, and 665 were abstracts or presentations that did not relate to SCPs for adults or were not empirical, which left 42 articles for inclusion in this review. Studies regarding SCP fell into 3 categories: 1) content (n=14), 2) dissemination and implementation (n=14), and 3) survivor and provider outcomes (n=14). SCPs have been endorsed and are associated with improved knowledge, but SCP use remains sporadic. Only 4 studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that avoided many biases associated with observational studies. Other limitations included cross‐sectional or pre‐SCP–post‐SCP (“pre‐post”) designs, limited generalizability caused by a lack of sample diversity, and a lack of systematic testing of data‐collection tools. The quantity and quality of SCP research are limited. SCPs have been endorsed, but evidence of improved outcomes associated with SCP is limited. Future research that addresses the methodological concerns of extant studies is needed regarding SCP use, content, and outcomes. Cancer 2015;121:978–996. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
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