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(searched for: doi:10.1007/978-1-4612-5437-9_3)
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, Said Derraz, Abdessamad El Ouahabi, Aziz Aghzadi, Abderrafie Jamily, Mustapha El Azouzi
Neurosurgery, Volume 49, pp 1224-1230; https://doi.org/10.1097/00006123-200111000-00036

Abstract:
OBJECTIVE: Many neurosurgeons consider cerebral aneurysms to be rare in Africa and the Middle East. In this report, we describe the pattern of cerebral aneurysms in Morocco and call into question the idea of their rarity in developing countries. Our objective is to urge neurosurgeons in these areas to track them and to treat them under better conditions. METHODS: We report a retrospective study of 200 patients with cerebral aneurysms admitted to our department between 1983 and 1999. The results of this study are supported by pertinent epidemiological surveys, anatomic studies on the incidence of cerebral aneurysms in Morocco, and analysis of the literature related to the epidemiology of aneurysms in developing countries. RESULTS: The patients in our series ranged in age from 7 to 70 years (mean age, 52 yr), with a slight female predominance (52%). They presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage (173 patients), cranial nerve palsy (18 patients), or mass symptoms (9 patients). The delay between subarachnoid hemorrhage and admission ranged from 1 to 30 days (mean, 14 d). The aneurysm was located in the internal carotid artery in 42%, in the anterior communicating and anterior cerebral arteries in 28%, in the middle cerebral artery in 19%, and in the vertebrobasilar artery in 10%. Multiple aneurysms were encountered in 9% and giant aneurysms in 15.5%. Seventeen patients died before surgery (with vasospasm in 13 cases and rebleeding in 4 cases), and 19 died after surgery. Follow-up, ranging between 1 and 10 years, revealed good outcomes with complete recovery in 64.5% and recovery with major sequelae in 7%. Pre- and postoperative mortality represented 18%; there was no operative treatment and no follow-up in 11.5%. CONCLUSION: Some data in this study (the delay between subarachnoid hemorrhage and admission, the high incidence of urban patients [80%], and the high rate of giant aneurysms) explain why many cases of ruptured aneurysms are not diagnosed. The analysis of our clinical series and the results of the epidemiological surveys show that the incidence has doubled every 5 years. These findings confirm that cerebral aneurysms are not rare in Morocco. A critical reading of the published articles claiming a low incidence of cerebral aneurysms in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia shows that this conclusion is not based on accurate and reliable statistical studies. Neurosurgeons in these regions should abandon this idea of rarity, and they should search for arterial cerebral aneurysms and develop the optimum conditions for the treatment of patients with aneurysms.
Michiyasu Suzuki, Takehide Onuma, Yoshiharu Sakurai, Kazuo Mizoi, Akira Ogawa, Takashi Yoshimoto
Journal of Neurosurgery, Volume 76, pp 455-458; https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1992.76.3.0455

Abstract:
✓ This study reviews aneurysms of the proximal segment (A1) of the anterior cerebral artery in 38 patients (23 men and 15 women) and their surgical, angiographic, and clinical management. Thirty-seven aneurysms were saccular and one was fusiform. The incidence of A1 aneurysms among a total of 4295 aneurysm cases treated was 0.88%. Multiple aneurysms occurred in 17 patients (44.7%) of the 38 cases; in 10 (58.8%), there was bleeding from the A1 aneurysm. The aneurysms were classified into five categories according to the mode of origin of the aneurysm in relation to the A1 segment: in 21 cases, aneurysms originated from the junction of the A1 segment and a perforating artery; in eight, from the A1 segment directly; in six, from the proximal end of the A1 fenestration; and in two, from the junction of the A1 segment and the cortical branch. One patient had a fusiform aneurysm. Computerized tomography (CT) of these aneurysms revealed bleeding extending to the septum pellucidum similar to that of anterior communicating artery aneurysms. When performing radical surgery it is very important to recognize the characteristics of A1 aneurysms, including multiplicity, a high incidence of vascular anomalies (especially A1 fenestration), and their similarity to anterior communicating artery aneurysms on CT.
Wouter I. Schievink, Bahram Mokri, David G. Piepgras
Journal of Neurosurgery, Volume 76, pp 62-66; https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1992.76.1.0062

Abstract:
✓ The pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms and spontaneous cervical artery dissection is incompletely understood but a primary arteriopathy, possibly similar in both disorders, may be of importance. To investigate the frequency of intracranial aneurysms in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection, the angiograms of 164 patients who were diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic as having spontaneous extracranial carotid or vertebral artery dissection were reviewed. Thirteen intracranial aneurysms were detected in nine (5.5%) of the 164 patients: eight (8.8%) of the 91 female patients and one (1.4%) of the 73 male patients. The frequency of intracranial aneurysms in these patients was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in a recent angiographic study from the same institution, estimating the frequency of intracranial aneurysms in the general population (1.1%). The significance of these findings is discussed.
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