Refine Search

New Search

Results: 15

(searched for: doi:10.1007/s12239-012-0105-5)
Save to Scifeed
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Mongkol Dangsunthonchai, Poranat Visuwan, Cholada Komintarachat, , Sathaporn Chuepeng
Published: 18 January 2022
ACS Omega, Volume 7, pp 3384-3394; https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.1c05627

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Ajay Kumar Srivastava, Niranajan Gandigudi, Karan Anand
Published: 18 July 2019
Journal of the Energy Institute, Volume 93, pp 463-473; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joei.2019.07.005

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of Thermal Engineering, Volume 5, pp 108-118; https://doi.org/10.18186/thermal.532252

Abstract:
The toxic nature of exhaust gases released by these engines has led to environmental concerns, affecting its sustainability. The exhaust emission from diesel engine includes carbon monoxide, nitrates, hydrocarbons and particulate matter. Soot particles contained in the particulate matter is also found to be carcinogenic in nature and also leads to various lung diseases. Diesel oxidation catalysis system involves oxidation of hydrocarbons, nitrates and soluble organic fraction. Diesel particulate filtration blocks the soot particles with the help of alternately plugged diesel particulate filter with porous walls. The regeneration of accumulated soot is one of the major challenges faced by automotive industries for effective implementation of diesel particulate filtration system. A detailed review on the challenges faced in the implementation of emission control techniques has been carried out in this study and it has been explored from the results of literature study that microwave based regeneration technique would be an effective technique. This paper provides a platform for understanding the working principle of post treatment emission control techniques and also on the role of regeneration in effective operation of Diesel Particulate Filter.

Published: 31 January 2019
by MDPI
Energies, Volume 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12030455

Abstract:
The connection cones between an exhaust pipe and an exhaust after-treatment system (EATS) will affect the flow into the first monolith. In this study, a new streamlined connection cone using non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) is applied to optimize the flow uniformity inside two different monoliths (a gasoline particulate filter and an un-coated monolith). NURBS and conventional cones were created using 3D printing with two different cone angles. The velocities after the monolith were collected to present the uniformity of the flows under different cones and different velocities. The test results indicate that NURBS cones exhibit better performance. Furthermore, all of the pressure drops of the bench test were measured and compared with those of the conventional cones, demonstrating that the NURBS cones can reduce the pressure drop by up to 12%. The computer fluid dynamics simulations depict detailed changes in the flow before and after entering the monolith. The results show that the NURBS cone avoids the generation of a recirculating zone associated with conventional cones and creates a more uniform flow, which causes a lower pressure drop. Meanwhile, the package structure of the NURBS cone can reduce the space requirements. Finally, the implications of the flow distributions are discussed.
Jing Tian, , Xiaoyu Pu, Linbo Gu, Yunxi Shi, Yingxin Cui, Runlin Fan
Published: 25 September 2018
Chemical Papers, Volume 73, pp 455-468; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11696-018-0593-5

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Journal of Environmental Sciences, Volume 67, pp 161-170; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jes.2017.08.021

Abstract:
Diesel exhaust aerosols (DEAs) can absorb and accumulate toxic metal particulates and bacteria suspended in the atmospheric environment, which impact human health and the environment. The use of acoustic standing waves (ASWs) to aggregate DEA is currently considered to be an efficient particle removal method; however, study of the effect of different temperatures on the acoustic aggregation process is scarce. To explore the method and technology to regulate and optimize the aerosol aggregation process through temperature tuning, an acoustic apparatus integrated with a temperature regulation function was constructed. Using this apparatus, the effect of different characteristic temperatures (CTs) on the aerosol aggregation process was investigated experimentally in the ASW environment. Under constant conditions of acoustic frequency 1.286kHz, voltage amplitude 17V and input electric power 16.7W, the study concentrated on temperature effects on the aggregation process in the CT range of 58-72°C. The DEA opacity was used. The results demonstrate that the aggregation process is quite sensitive to the CT, and that the optimal DEA aggregation can be achieved at 66°C. The aggregated particles of 68.17μm are composed of small nanoparticles of 13.34-62.15nm. At CTs higher and lower than 66°C, the apparatus in non-resonance mode reduces the DEA aggregation level. For other instruments, the method for obtaining the optimum temperature for acoustic agglomeration is universal. This preliminary demonstration shows that the use of acoustic technology to regulate the aerosol aggregation process through tuning the operating temperature is feasible and convenient.
, Ming Liu, Yuanwang Deng, Hao Zhu, Jinke Gong
The Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering, Volume 94, pp 168-174; https://doi.org/10.1002/cjce.22366

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Sungha Baek, Dongyoung Jin, Wonwook Jang, Cha-Lee Myung, , Jeongmin Lee
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering, Volume 230, pp 745-753; https://doi.org/10.1177/0954407015594908

Abstract:
The nanoparticle emissions from gasoline direct-injection engines are of concern because of the high particle number concentrations compared with those from a gasoline port fuel injection engine. A gasoline particulate filter is a potential solution for reducing the particulate matter emissions. In this study, a 2.0 l turbocharged gasoline direct-injection vehicle with a metal-foam-type gasoline particulate filter was tested using the New European Driving Cycle and steady vehicle operating conditions. The particle number concentration, the particle-size distribution and the filtration efficiency were determined using a condensation particle counter and a fast response differential mobility spectrometer (DMS500). The particle number emissions (particle numbers per vehicle travelling distance (particles/km)) over the New European Driving Cycle were 1.95 × 1012 particles/km for a base vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter and 5.68 × 1011 particles/km for the additional installation of a gasoline particulate filter on the base gasoline direct-injection vehicle. The filtration efficiency of the particle number and the particulate matter mass reached approximately 71% and 67% respectively. The nucleation-mode particles in the size range less than 23 nm for the gasoline direct-injection vehicle equipped with a three-way catalytic converter were further reduced on installation of a gasoline particulate filter at the downstream position of the three-way catalytic converter. A sharp pressure drop between the gasoline particulate filter of 21.0 mbar was obtained at a vehicle speed of 120 km/h in the New European Driving Cycle. The exhaust gas temperature before the gasoline particulate filter reached around 380–610 °C at steady vehicle speeds of 60–120 km/h. The installation of the gasoline particulate filter has the potential to satisfy the Euro 6c particle number emissions regulations for light-duty gasoline direct-injection vehicles.
Pi Qiang Tan, Shu Wang, Yuan Hu Zhi, Di Ming Lou
Advanced Materials Research, Volume 1008-1009, pp 995-1000; https://doi.org/10.4028/www.scientific.net/amr.1008-1009.995

Abstract:
Emission characteristics of an electronic-controlled high pressure common-rail diesel engine with low-blend Gas-to-liquids (GTL) and low-blend biodiesel fuels are studied. Pure diesel fuel, G10 fuel (10% GTL blend with diesel fuel) and B10 fuel (10% biodiesel blend with diesel fuel) are used in this research. The results show that torque of the engine with pure diesel fuel is higher than G10 fuel, and B10 fuel is the lowest. Compared to the pure diesel fuel, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) of the engine with G10 fuel decreases, but the B10 fuel increases slightly. Hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of the engine with G10 fuel or B10 fuel are lower than the pure diesel fuel, and the carbon monoxide (CO) emission increases slightly, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions have no distinct change. Compared to the G10 fuel, the CO and HC emissions of the engine with B10 fuel are lower.
Page of 1
Articles per Page
by
Show export options
  Select all
Back to Top Top