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Chiara Corti, Edoardo Crimini, Carmen Criscitiello, Dario Trapani, Giuseppe Curigliano
Current Opinion in Oncology, Volume 32, pp 594-602; doi:10.1097/cco.0000000000000678

Bruno A. Duso, , Antonio Marra, Paolo D’Amico, Elena Guerini Rocco, , Luca Mazzarella, Carmen Criscitiello, Angela Esposito,
Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, Volume 21, pp 1493-1504; doi:10.1080/14656566.2020.1763305

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Michael J. Hassett, Mark R. Somerfield, Elisha R. Baker, Fatima Cardoso, Kari J. Kansal, Dylan C. Kwait, Jennifer K. Plichta, Charité Ricker, Anna Roshal, Kathryn J. Ruddy, et al.
Journal of Clinical Oncology, Volume 38, pp 1849-1863; doi:10.1200/jco.19.03120

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, Abdelhalim Mesfioui, Abdellatif Benider
Pan African Medical Journal, Volume 37; doi:10.11604/pamj.2020.37.343.23004

Abstract:
Male breast cancer is a rare disease accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide to our knowledge. The aim of this retrospective study is to analyse the epidemiologic, clinical, therapeutic and evolutive profiles of this disease and to compare some cancer aspects between male and female in 25 cases collected at Mohamed VI Oncology Center at the University Hospital of Casablanca between 2012 and 2018. Of all breast cancers, men with breast cancer make up a minority. Male compared to female breast cancers occurred later in life with higher stage and more estrogen receptor-positive tumors. The median age was 67.7 years. The average diagnosis delay was 15.7 month. Cancer was discovered through self examination in 76.1% of cases. The mean diameter was 3.5 cm and range from 1-6 cm. According to the tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification, tumors were classified as T1-T2 (40%) and T3-T4 (60%). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent (92%) and 1 case of lobular carcinoma. Axillary nodal involvement was present in 82.4% of cases. Hormonal receptors were positive in 83% of cases. 86.6% of our cases present metastasis. Bone was the most representative site. Surgery was usually mastectomy with axillary clearance. It was possible to follow 21 of the patients. The median of follow-up was 12 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrence in 6 cases. There was 9 cases of death. Death was usually due to comorbid disease and to the advanced age. The 5 years overall survival rates were 57%.
, Mustafa Tukenmez, Enver Özkurt
Breast Diseases pp 337-348; doi:10.1007/978-3-030-16792-9_22

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Thomas R O’Leary, Craig D Shriver, Gary Wind
Military Medicine, Volume 184; doi:10.1093/milmed/usz049

Abstract:
Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare and consequently understudied. Here we present the case of contralateral breast cancer in a male patient nearly a quarter century following his initial breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, characterization, treatment, and prognosis of male breast cancer are reviewed. MBC accounts for <1% of all breast cancer with an estimated incidence nearly 1.25 per 100,000 person years. Our patient tested positive for ATM mutation of undetermined significance. More commonly in males, a BRCA2 mutation confers a >1 in 15 lifetime risk of breast cancer and is present in >11% of MBC patients, while BRCA1 is present in an estimated <1.5% of MBC patients. The risk of contralateral breast cancer developing in a male with a unilateral lesion is much higher than for a primary male breast cancer in the general population. Men tend to be diagnosed at a later age and stage than females. Prognosis for male and female breast cancer is similar considering both age of patient and stage of the tumor at diagnosis, and similar treatment paradigms have resulted in similar outcomes. Although lumpectomy with radiation therapy may have the same prognosis as mastectomy, the standard of care for male breast cancer continues to be simple mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy.
, Andreas Hesse, Alexander König, Felicitas Schulte-Vorwick, Simone Schrodi, Nina Ditsch, Sven Mahner,
Uro-News, Volume 22, pp 26-29; doi:10.1007/s00092-018-1990-3

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Qiuxia Cui, Deguang Kong, Zhihua Li, Philemon Ahiable, Kun Wang, Kongming Wu,
Published: 1 October 2018
Clinical Breast Cancer, Volume 18; doi:10.1016/j.clbc.2018.01.011

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, Andreas Hesse, Alexander König, Felicitas Schulte-Vorwick, Simone Schrodi, Nina Ditsch, Sven Mahner,
gynäkologie + geburtshilfe, Volume 23, pp 25-27; doi:10.1007/s15013-018-1393-2

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, Andreas Hesse, Alexander König, Felicitas Schulte-Vorwick, Simone Schrodi, Nina Ditsch, Sven Mahner, Nadia Harbeck
Im Focus Onkologie, Volume 21, pp 16-18; doi:10.1007/s15015-018-3742-3

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World Journal of Surgical Oncology, Volume 16; doi:10.1186/s12957-018-1318-5

Abstract:
Intracystic papillary carcinoma (IPC) is defined as cancer that develops from the wall of a cyst in the breast. As breast cancer in men accounts for only 1% of all breast cancers, male IPC is an extremely rare form of the disease. The present case report examines IPC in a man, along with an in-depth literature discussion. A 64-year-old Japanese man noticed a mass in the right breast and sought medical attention. An elastic and soft neoplastic 3-cm lesion was palpated in the right papilla. As a 1-cm solid tumor with a gradual rise from the cyst wall was confirmed within the cyst, vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) was performed on that site. Pathological examination of the biopsy revealed heterotypic cells with an enlarged oval nucleus forming dense papillary structures mainly of vascular connective tissue component. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) confirmed thickening of the wall that protruded outside the cyst. The preoperative diagnosis was right breast cancer (male IPC) TisN0M0 stage 0 luminal B-like. Total mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy were performed. In the excised specimen, a 4.0-cm unilocular cyst was found, along with a 1-cm solid tumor with a gradual rise from the cyst wall. Pathological diagnosis of the resected specimen shared similar characteristics with the solid tumor in the cyst: notably, an oval nucleus with histologically clear nucleolus and fine granular chromatin, cylindrically shaped heterotypic cells, and the presence of basophilic cells in the papillary growth with a thin stem of fibrovasculature as the axis. Some invasion of tumor cells into the interstitium was confirmed. As such, the final diagnosis was right breast cancer (male IPC) T2N0M0 stage IIA luminal B-like. The expression of hormone receptor (ER and PgR) was high, and endocrine therapy was initiated postoperatively (20 mg/day tamoxifen). At the present time (3 months postoperation), there has not been any evidence of metastasis. We reported a rare case of an IPC in the male breast, along with a literature review.
, Andreas Hesse, Alexander König, Felicitas Schulte-Vorwick, Simone Schrodi, , Sven Mahner,
MMW - Fortschritte der Medizin, Volume 159, pp 67-72; doi:10.1007/s15006-017-0395-7

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, S McCain, S Kirk
Published: 12 September 2017
The Ulster medical journal, Volume 86, pp 177-180

Abstract:
Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of breast cancers with published overall and disease free survival being lower than in females. To determine treatment and long term outcomes for male breast cancer patients in our unit. A database has been maintained for all breast cancer patients diagnosed in our unit since 1993. Patients were identified using the database and information was collated on patient demographics, tumour pathology, treatment and outcomes using the database and retrospective chart review. Patients were followed to cause of death. From 1994-2009 twenty-four cancers were diagnosed in twenty-two patients. Mean age at diagnosis was 69. Male breast cancer patients were treated using similar principles to female breast cancer. Twenty patients underwent mastectomy, two patients underwent wide local excision. No patients developed local recurrence. One patient died from their breast cancer with systemic metastases. 10-year overall survival was 22%, 10 year disease-specific survival was 80%. Other causes of death included medical co-morbidity and secondary cancers. Disease free survival in our unit is comparable to other published studies. High age at diagnosis and co-morbidity are the most important factors in determining overall outcome. Treatment pathways for male breast cancer should follow guidelines for female disease in order to optimise outcomes. Future research at national or international level is necessary to ensure the most effective treatments are implemented for male breast cancer patients.
, Frank Udomah, Yakubu Abdulrahaman, Isaac Zama, Momodu Imoru, Teddy Charles Adias, Tosan Erhabor, Lori J., Amos Dangana, Bibiana Nonye Egenti, et al.
Perioperative Inflammation as Triggering Origin of Metastasis Development pp 123-159; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-57943-6_6

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Ian Fentiman
Male Breast Cancer pp 115-128; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-04669-3_9

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Paulo Franscisco Mascarenhas Bender, Letícia Lima De Oliveira, Célia Regina Costa, Suzana Sales De Aguiar, Anke Bergmann,
Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology, Volume 143, pp 563-571; doi:10.1007/s00432-016-2311-4

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K. Alaoui Slimani, A. Debbagh, , H. Errihani, M. Ichou
Gynécologie Obstétrique & Fertilité, Volume 44, pp 636-640; doi:10.1016/j.gyobfe.2016.08.009

, Jean F. Simpson
A Comprehensive Guide to Core Needle Biopsies of the Breast pp 687-704; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-26291-8_18

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BMC Cancer, Volume 16, pp 1-11; doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2414-y

Abstract:
Male breast cancer (MBC) is rare. Given the paucity of randomized trials, treatment is generally extrapolated from female breast cancer guidelines. This is a retrospective analysis of all male patients presenting with MBC at the Department of Oncology at University Federico II of Naples between January 1989 and January 2014. We recorded the following data: baseline characteristics (age, height, weight, body mass index, risk factors, family history), tumor characteristics (side affected, stage, histotype, hormonal and HER2 status, and Ki-67 expression), treatment (type of surgery, chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, and/or radiotherapy), BRCA1/2 mutation status (if available), other tumors, and long-term survival. Forty-seven patients were analyzed. Median age was 62.0 [55.0–72.0]. Among risk factors, obesity and family history of breast cancer were associated with 21 % and 30 % of MBC cases, respectively. The majority of tumors were diagnosed at an early stage: stage I (34.0 %) and stage II (44.7 %). Infiltrating ductal carcinoma was the most frequent histologic subtype (95.8 %). Hormone receptors were generally positive (88.4 % of cases were Estrogen receptor [ER] positive and 81.4 % Progesteron receptor [PgR] positive). Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) was positive in 26.8 % of cases; 7.0 % of MBCs were triple negative. The tumor had high proliferation index (Ki67 ≥ 20 %) in 64.7 %. Surgery was predominantly mastectomy (85.1 %), whereas quadrantectomy was performed in 14.9 % of patients. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 70.7 % of patients, endocrine therapy to 90.2 %, trastuzumab to 16.7 % and radiotherapy to 32.6 %. BRCA status was available for 17 patients: 10 wild-type, 1 BRCA1 carrier, 5 BRCA2 carriers, 1 unknown variant sequence. The overall estimated long-term survival was about 90 % at 5 years, 80 % at 10 years and 70 % at 20 years. Patients carrying a BRCA mutation had a significantly lower survival than patients with wild-type BRCA (p = 0.04). Long-term survival was high in MBC patients referred to our clinical unit. Survival was poorer in BRCA-mutated patients than in patients with wild-type BRCA.
Rebecca A Millican-Slater, Craig D Sayers, Andrew M Hanby,
British Journal of Cancer, Volume 115, pp 339-345; doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.178

Abstract:
Male breast cancer is rare and treatment is based on data from females. High expression/activity of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) denotes a poor prognosis in female breast cancer, and the eIF4E pathway has been targeted therapeutically. Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E activity in female breast cancer is deregulated by eIF4E overexpression and by phosphorylation of its binding protein, 4E-BP1, which relieves inhibitory association between eIF4E and 4E-BP1. The relevance of the eIF4E pathway in male breast cancer is unknown. We have assessed expression levels of eIF4E, 4E-BP1, 4E-BP2 and phosphorylated 4E-BP1 (p4E-BP1) using immunohistochemistry in a large cohort of male breast cancers (n=337) and have examined correlations with prognostic factors and survival. Neither eIF4E expression nor estimated eIF4E activity were associated with prognosis. However, a highly significant correlation was found between p4E-BP1 expression and disease-free survival (DFS), linking any detectable p4E-BP1 with poor survival (univariate log rank P=0.001; multivariate HR 8.8, P=0.0001). Our data provide no support for direct therapeutic targeting of eIF4E in male breast cancer, unlike in females. However, as p4E-BP1 gives powerful prognostic insights that are unrelated to eIF4E function, p4E-BP1 may identify male breast cancers potentially suitable for therapies directed at the upstream kinase, mTOR.
, Mustafa Tükenmez,
Breast Disease pp 389-403; doi:10.1007/978-3-319-26012-9_23

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
International Journal of Surgery Case Reports, Volume 20, pp 8-11; doi:10.1016/j.ijscr.2016.02.004

Abstract:
The male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare and represents less than 1% of all malignancies in men and only 1% of all breast cancers incident. We illustrate the experience of our team about the clinico-pathological characteristics, treatment and prognostic factors of patients treated over a period of twenty years . Forty-seven patients were collected 1995–2014 at the Breast Unit of the Hospital of Terni, Italy. The average age was 67 years and the median time to diagnosis from the onset of symptoms was 16 months. The main clinical complaint was sub areolar swelling in 36, 76% of cases. Most patients have come to our attention with advanced disease. The histology of about ninety percent of the tumors were invasive ductal carcinoma. Management consisted mainly of radical mastectomy; followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonal therapy with or without chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 38 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrences; in eight cases (17% of all patients). Metastasis occurred in 15 cases (32% of all patients). The site of bone metastases was in eight cases; lung in four cases; liver in three cases; liver and skin in one case and pleura and skin in one case. The male breast cancer has many similarities to breast cancer in women, but there are distinct functions that need to be appreciated. Future research for a better understanding of the disease should provide a better account of genetic and epigenetic characteristics of these forms; but, above all, epidemiological and biological cohorts numerically more consistent.
Raj Nagarkar, Sirshendu Roy, Aditya Adhav, Abhishek Jadhav, Ashutosh Tondare
Journal of Evolution of Medical and Dental Sciences, Volume 4, pp 16551-16553; doi:10.14260/jemds/2015/2463

, , Nilgun Ozbek Okumus, Deniz Meydan, Yurdanur Sullu, Guzin Gonullu
Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, Volume 16, pp 6673-6679; doi:10.7314/apjcp.2015.16.15.6673

Abstract:
Male breast cancer is a rare neoplasm, and its treatments are based on those of female breast cancer. This study aimed to analyze 20 years of male breast cancer clinical characteristics and treatment results from the Middle Black Sea Region of Turkey.
Zahi I. Mitri, Michelle Jackson, Carolyn Garby, Juhee Song, , Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, , S. Shahrukh Hashmi, Banu K. Arun,
Published: 6 May 2015
by Wiley
The Oncologist, Volume 20, pp 593-597; doi:10.1634/theoncologist.2014-0425

Abstract:
Background. BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model to estimate the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. BRCA mutation carriers are at higher risk of developing breast, ovarian, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO was developed for women and found to be superior to other risk assessment models. The present study evaluated the validity of BRCAPRO at predicting the risk of male patients carrying a BRCA mutation. Patients and Methods. A total of 146 men who presented for genetic counseling and testing from February1997 to September 2011, and their test results were included in the present study. BRCAPRO risk assessment for all patients was calculated using the BRCAPRO clinical CancerGene assessment software. Results. The mean age at presentation was 57 years. Of the 146 patients, 48 had breast cancer, 18 had pancreatic cancer, 39 had prostate cancer, 27 had other primary cancers, and 37 had no cancer. Fifty patients (34%) tested positive for a BRCA mutation (22 BRCA1 , 27 BRCA2 , and 1 BRCA1 and BRCA2 ). The mean BRCAPRO score for all patients was 24.96%. The BRCAPRO score was significantly higher for patients who tested positive for a BRCA mutation (46.19% vs. 13.9%, p < .01). The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.83 for all patients for the BRCAPRO score to predict the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. At a cutoff point of 30.02%, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 0.74, 0.81, 0.67, and 0.86, respectively. Conclusion. BRCAPRO appears to be a valid risk assessment tool for determining the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation in men. Implications for Practice: Men carrying genetic mutations in the BRCA gene have a greater risk than the general population of developing certain types of cancer, including breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer. BRCAPRO is a risk assessment model that predicts the risk of carrying a BRCA mutation. The present study aimed at validating BRCAPRO for use with men seen for genetic counseling, whether affected by cancer or not. The data available for 146 patients revealed that BRCAPRO was effective at identifying patients at risk of BRCA mutation. These findings could help in identifying a subset of high‐risk patients who should proceed to genetic testing.
, Guilherme Brasileiro De Aguiar, , Aline Lariessy Campos Paiva, Eduardo Urbano Da Silva, Jose Carlos Esteves Veiga
Case Reports in Neurological Medicine, Volume 2015, pp 1-4; doi:10.1155/2015/482839

Abstract:
Context. Breast cancer (BC) in men is a rare condition, corresponding to 1% of all neoplasms in this gender. Some studies show that up to 93% of BC cases in men are advanced disease. If its occurrence constitutes an uncommon fact, the appearance of a metastasis to the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely rare. The objective of the present study is to present the case of a male patient, bearer of HIV infection, who presented with BC and later metastasis to the CNS. We also include a brief review of the literature. Case Report. We describe a case of a male patient, 59 years old, with HIV infection and a history of BC treated 4 years earlier, which progressed into headache and vertigo. Neuroimaging exams showed lesions suggestive of cerebral metastasis and a stereotaxic biopsy confirmed BC metastasis. Conclusion. Breast cancer in men with metastasis to the CNS is a rare condition and similar reports were not found in the available databases. It should be pointed out that even though rare, it should be considered among the differential diagnoses for SNC metastases in men, although HIV infection favors the appearance of some types of cancer.
, Lisa A. Kachnic,
International Journal of Breast Cancer, Volume 2014, pp 1-14; doi:10.1155/2014/685842

Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to compare the racial differences in treatment and overall survival (OS) of male breast cancer (MBC) patients. Data were extracted from the NCI SEER database that included population-based registries from 1988 to 2010 and analyzed using SPSS 20.0. 4,279 MBC patients were identified. 3,266 (76.3%) patients were White, 552 (12.9%) Black, 246 (5.7%) Hispanic, and 215 (5.0%) Asian. Black patients were more likely to be diagnosed at younger age (P < 0.001), have advanced stage disease (P = 0.001), and be unmarried (P < 0.001) and less likely to undergo lymph node dissection (P = 0.006). When stratified by stage, there was no difference in receipt of primary treatment by race. The 5-year OS for White, Black, Hispanic, and Asian races was 73.8%, 66.3%, 74.0%, and 85.3% (P < 0.001). This significant worse 5-year OS for Blacks persisted regardless of age, stage II or III disease, and grade 2 or 3 disease. On multivariate analysis, Black race was a significant independent prognostic factor for worse OS. Blacks were less likely to receive lymph node dissection of which patients may derive benefit, though we did not observe receipt of primary treatment, after stratifying for disease stage, to be an underlying factor contributing to racial outcome differences.
, Anke Bergmann
Published: 28 May 2014
The Aging Male, Volume 18, pp 118-123; doi:10.3109/13685538.2014.922532

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Dongying Liu, Guangru Xie, Ming Chen
International Journal of Clinical Oncology, Volume 19, pp 280-287; doi:10.1007/s10147-013-0555-4

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, E. P. Winer
Published: 20 February 2013
Annals of Oncology, Volume 24, pp 1434-1443; doi:10.1093/annonc/mdt025

Abstract:
The causes, optimal treatments, and medical/psychosocial sequelae of breast cancer in men are poorly understood. A systematic review of the English language literature was conducted to identify studies relevant to male breast cancer between 1987 and 2012 and including at least 20 patients. Searches were carried out on PubMed using the title terms ‘male breast cancer’ or ‘male breast carcinoma’. Relevant published data regarding risk factors, biological characteristics, presentation and prognosis, appropriate evaluation and treatment, and survivorship issues in male breast cancer patients are presented. BRCA2 mutations, age, conditions that alter the estrogen/androgen ratio, and radiation are proven risk factors. Disease biology is distinct in men, but diagnostic approaches and treatments for men are generally extrapolated from those in women due to inadequate research in men. Survivorship issues in men may include sexual and hormonal side-effects of endocrine therapies as well as unique psychosocial impacts of the disease. Further research is needed to address gaps in knowledge pertaining to care of male breast cancer patients and survivors.
, Yahaya Ukwenya, Adamu Abdullahi, Iliyasu Muhammad
International Journal of Breast Cancer, Volume 2012, pp 1-6; doi:10.1155/2012/845143

Abstract:
Male breast cancer is an uncommon disease accounting for only 1% of all breast cancers. We present the evaluation, treatment and outcome of male patients seen with breast cancer in our institution. Male patients that had histological diagnosis of breast cancer from 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively evaluated. After evaluation patients were treated with modified radical mastectomy. Combination chemotherapy was given to patients with positive axillary lymph nodes. Radiotherapy and hormonal therapy were also employed. There were 57 male patients with breast cancer which accounted for 9% of all breast cancers seen during the study period. Their mean age was 59 ± 2.3 years. The mean tumor diameter was 13 ± 2.5 cm. Fifty three (93%) patients presented with advanced disease including 15 with distant metastasis. Four patients with stage II disease were treated with modified radical mastectomy, chemotherapy and tamoxifen. Of the 30 patients with sage III disease that had modified radical mastectomy, complete axillary clearance and tumor free margins were achieved in 25. Overall 21 (36.8%) patients were tumor free at one year. Overall 5-year survival was 22.8%. In conclusion, male patients with breast cancer present with advanced disease which is associated with poor outcome of treatment.
, Daniel S. Kapp, Kathleen C. Horst
Published: 1 June 2012
The Breast, Volume 21, pp 296-302; doi:10.1016/j.breast.2012.01.008

Abstract:
The locoregional management of breast cancer in men has evolved over time. Multimodality treatment regimens currently in use are based primarily on large randomized trials that exclusively enrolled women with breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed cases of male breast cancer treated with radiotherapy at Stanford University Medical Center with an emphasis on 22 patients treated with surgery and locoregional radiotherapy. We report trends in the surgical techniques as well as in the use of adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy. There were no isolated locoregional failures in this cohort, and 5-year disease-free survival was 65%. The use of contemporary surgical and radiotherapeutic techniques in men is discussed. We conclude that treatment guidelines designed for women should be applied to the locoregional management of breast cancer in men. However, large international prospective registries and inclusion of men in cooperative group randomized trials will be important to confirm the safety and efficacy of modern treatment modalities for male breast cancer.
BMC Cancer, Volume 11, pp 335-335; doi:10.1186/1471-2407-11-335

Abstract:
Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease accounting for approximately 1% of all breast carcinomas. Presently treatment recommendations are derived from the standards for female breast cancer. However, those approaches might be inadequate because of distinct gender specific differences in tumor biology of breast cancer. This study was planned in order to contrast potential differences between female and male breast cancer in both tumor biological behavior and clinical management.
BMC Research Notes, Volume 4, pp 219-219; doi:10.1186/1756-0500-4-219

Abstract:
Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease representing less than 1% of all malignancies in men and only 1% of all incident breast cancers. Our study details clinico-pathological features, treatments and prognostic factors in a large Moroccan cohort.One hundred and twenty-seven patients were collected from 1985 to 2007 at the National Institute of Oncology in Rabat, Morocco.Median age was 62 years and median time for consultation 28 months. The main clinical complaint was a mass beneath the areola in 93, 5% of the cases. Most patients have an advanced disease. Ninety-one percent of tumors were ductal carcinomas.Management consisted especially of radical mastectomy; followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and hormonal therapy with or without chemotherapy. The median of follow-up was 30 months. The evolution has been characterized by local recurrence; in twenty two cases (17% of all patients). Metastasis occurred in 41 cases (32% of all patients). The site of metastasis was the bone in twenty cases; lung in twelve cases; liver in seven case; liver and skin in one case and pleura and skin in one case.Male breast cancer has many similarities to breast cancer in women, but there are distinct features that should be appreciated. Future research for better understanding of this disease at national or international level are needed to improve the management and prognosis of male patients.
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