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(searched for: doi:10.3816/clml.2011.n.008)
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, Giovanni Genovese, Farzan Solimani, Alba Guglielmo, Alessandro Pileri, Francesca Portelli, Michael Hertl, Angelo Valerio Marzano, Emiliano Antiga
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, Volume 21, pp 833-854; doi:10.1007/s40257-020-00553-9

Abstract:
Haematological malignancies induce important alterations of the immune system, which account for the high frequency of autoimmune complications observed in patients. Cutaneous immune-mediated diseases associated with haematological malignancies encompass a heterogeneous group of dermatoses, including, among others, neutrophilic and eosinophilic dermatoses, autoantibody-mediated skin diseases, vasculitis and granulomatous dermatoses. Some of these diseases, such as paraneoplastic pemphigus, are associated with an increased risk of death; others, such as eosinophilic dermatoses of haematological malignancies, run a benign clinical course but portend a significant negative impairment on a patient’s quality of life. In rare cases, the skin eruption reflects immunological alterations associated with an unfavourable prognosis of the associated haematological disorder. Therapeutic management of immune-mediated skin diseases in patients with haematological malignancies is often challenging. Systemic corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs are considered frontline therapies but may considerably augment the risk of serious infections. Indeed, developing a specific targeted therapeutic approach is of crucial importance for this particularly fragile patient population. This review provides an up-to-date overview on the immune-mediated skin diseases most frequently encountered by patients with onco-haematological disorders, discussing new pathogenic advances and therapeutic options on the horizon.
, Mojtaba Akhtari, Sheda Heidarian
Recent Developments in Myelodysplastic Syndromes; doi:10.5772/intechopen.80710

Abstract:
Myelodysplastic syndromes are heterogeneous group of clonal hematologic malignancies characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias secondary to the ineffective hematopoiesis. ADs are frequently reported in MDS, the incidence ranging from 10 to 30%, and particularly ADs are more frequently seen at CMML. ADs may prone patient to MDS, especially when immune suppressors such as azathioprine are used for the underlying AD. Both innate and adaptive immune systems, and different cytokines including interleukins, TNF-α, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10) contribute in immune dysregulation of MDS. Vasculitis, seronegative rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, Behçet’s disease, RP, and AIHA are just some of the ADs occurring concomitantly with MDS. Although hematopoietic growth factors are recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), it has been recognized from several case reports that treatment of the underlying MDS may resolve the associated autoimmune disorders. The heterogeneity and complexity of pathology, clinical manifestations, response to therapy, and prognosis of MDS and its immune dysregulation make the prognosis of MDS with autoimmune diseases a matter of debate. Better understanding of the immune dysregulation of MDS in the molecular level may help to design prospective, double blind clinical trials to find the best treatment options for autoimmune disorders associated with MDS.
Comment
Internal Medicine, Volume 57, pp 2769-2771; doi:10.2169/internalmedicine.1059-18

Abstract:
Japan's largest platform for academic e-journals: J-STAGE is a full text database for reviewed academic papers published by Japanese societies
, Peter Brys, Koen Peers
Published: 3 July 2017
PM&R, Volume 10, pp 222-226; doi:10.1016/j.pmrj.2017.06.020

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 27 April 2017
by Wiley
Hematological Oncology, Volume 36, pp 15-23; doi:10.1002/hon.2423

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Journal of Medical Case Reports, Volume 11; doi:10.1186/s13256-017-1239-x

Abstract:
Large vessel vasculitis is a rare disorder usually occurring in the context of the autoimmune conditions of giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis. Case reports have described large vessel vasculitis occurring in individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome, preceding transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. A 56-year-old Afghanistan-born woman presented with fever, a tender left carotid artery, and raised inflammatory markers. Computed tomography revealed thickening of the wall of her left carotid artery. Her symptoms resolved spontaneously; however, they recurred weeks later on the contralateral side, along with abdominal pain after eating. Further imaging with computed tomography and positron emission tomography demonstrated resolution of her left carotid artery abnormality, but new wall thickening and inflammation in her right carotid artery, abdominal aorta, and superior mesenteric artery. She was diagnosed as having large vessel vasculitis, which resolved with corticosteroids and methotrexate. Five months later, she developed acute myeloid leukemia. She had no known history of myelodysplastic syndrome at the time of diagnosis with vasculitis. Large vessel vasculitis in older individuals presenting with atypical clinical features, such as a migratory pattern of affected vessels, vessel wall tenderness, and marked systemic inflammation, should prompt a search for underlying myelodysplasia. Clinicians should be vigilant for progression to acute myeloid leukemia.
Takayuki Katsuyama, Haruhito Adam Uchida, Kishio Toma, Yoshinobu Maeda, Daisho Hirota, Ryoko Umebayashi, Ken-Ei Sada, Hirofumi Makino
Internal Medicine, Volume 53, pp 63-66; doi:10.2169/internalmedicine.53.0949

Abstract:
A 71-year-old woman presented with a high-grade fever, neck pain, anemia and thrombocytopenia. After performing further examinations, we concluded that she had simultaneously developed large vessel vasculitis and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Although glucocorticoid administration improved her clinical symptoms, the MDS transformed into acute myeloid leukemia and she died one year after receiving the diagnosis. The occurrence of immune-mediated disorders in patients with MDS is a well-known phenomenon; however, large vessel vasculitis is a rare complication of MDS. Our case suggests that the association between systemic vasculitis and MDS may result in poor outcomes.
H Kato, , S Nakajima, Y Okitsu, N Fukuhara, T Fujiwara, M Yamada-Fujiwara, J Kameoka, K Ishizawa, H Harigae
Bone Marrow Transplantation, Volume 49, pp 458-459; doi:10.1038/bmt.2013.198

Abstract:
Significant improvement of Takayasu arteritis after cord blood transplantation in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome
Omar Al Ustwani, Laurie A. Ford, Sheila J.N. Sait, Anne Marie W. Block, Maurice Barcos, Carlos E. Vigil, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, James E. Thompson, Eunice S. Wang, Julian Ambrus, et al.
Published: 1 August 2013
Leukemia Research, Volume 37, pp 894-899; doi:10.1016/j.leukres.2013.04.007

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, J.F. Subra, , A. Ghali, G. Renier, M. Royer, Y. Le Corre, L. Martin, J. Voswinkel,
Published: 1 August 2013
Autoimmunity Reviews, Volume 12, pp 943-946; doi:10.1016/j.autrev.2013.01.005

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Toru Kawakami, Toshiro Ito, Hitoshi Sakai, Nodoka Sekiguchi, , Noriko Senoo, Sayaka Nishina,
Published: 30 April 2013
Leukemia & Lymphoma, Volume 54, pp 2748-2749; doi:10.3109/10428194.2013.786075

Amir Agha, , , Joanne Valeriano-Marcet
Current Rheumatology Reports, Volume 14, pp 526-531; doi:10.1007/s11926-012-0281-3

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