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(searched for: doi:10.1016/j.cedpsych.2009.08.001)
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Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft, Volume 19, pp 215-253; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11618-016-0704-4

Abstract:
Der Beitrag untersucht Leistungen und Leistungsgrenzen empirischer Bildungsforschung im Spannungsfeld zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik am Beispiel von Large-Scale-Assessment-Studies (LSA). Im metatheoretischen Rahmen differenter Handlungslogiken von Wissenschaft und Politik und unter Bezugnahme auf Goldthorpe’s (2001) Konzeption von Verursachung als generativem Prozess werden die Leistungen von LSA auf den Feldern der theoretischen und empirischen Rekonstruktion von bereichsspezifischen Leistungsdispositionen, der Beschreibung und Erklärung sozialer und ethnischer Disparitäten und der Identifikation von jungen Menschen mit einem besonders hohen Risiko der gesellschaftlichen Exklusion beschrieben. Dabei wird die Frage diskutiert, ob es in sozial-kommunikativen Kontexten theoretisch und empirisch sinnvoll ist, unterschiedliche Wissensformen – deskriptiv-analytische Rekonstruktion des Phänomens und unterschiedliche Modelle kausaler Erklärung – nach politischer Handlungsrelevanz zu unterscheiden. Der Beitrag thematisiert das Problem, wie die Kommunikation zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik trotz unterschiedlicher Funktionsrationalität auf Dauer gestellt werden kann, und macht auf die Gefahr von Grenzüberschreitungen und – damit verbunden – von nicht einlösbaren Leistungsversprechen seitens der Wissenschaft aufmerksam.
Nathan Sonnenfeld,
Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, Volume 60, pp 403-407; https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931213601091

Abstract:
Education remains a severely unpolished domain for the application of human factors principles; although human factors methods and theories thrive in their application within both the learning and training domains. Continued efforts are needed to increase educational outcomes from the human-system interaction perspective. This paper shall continue to investigate how to apply constructs and theory from within the related human factors, human-computer interaction, and usability fields to the domain of instructional design. This paper intends to place human factors, human-computer interaction, and usability measurement methods among those used to evaluate cognitive load for the benefit of instructional design, following a new quantitative model for cognitive load. This effort shall assist in increasing collaboration between the fields of human factors and education, and make a significant contribution to cognitive load theory measurement methods.
David R. Hodge, , Michael G. Vaughn
Research on Social Work Practice, Volume 26, pp 751-761; https://doi.org/10.1177/1049731516645929

Abstract:
Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the bibliometric contributions of high-impact social work faculty. Methods: Toward this end, we used a sample comprising fellows ( N = 143) affiliated with the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) and the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW). To quantify impact, we relied primarily upon the h-index (a measure of lifetime scholarly impact) and the m-index (which adjusts for career length). Results: Analyses revealed the mean h-index value for SSWR fellows ( M = 26.44, SD = 14.72) was substantially lower than the mean for AASWSW fellows ( M = 32.52, SD = 15.96), but minimal differences existed in m-index values. H- and m-index values for the 40 highest impact scholars ranged, respectively, from 33 to 93 and 1.13 to 3.33. Conclusions: The results indicate the social work profession includes many researchers who are making an exceptional scientific impact.
Hannah Greenbaum, Lisa Meyer, M Cecil Smith, Amanda Barber, Heather Henderson, David Riel,
Published: 16 February 2016
Educational Psychology Review, Volume 28, pp 215-223; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10648-016-9360-8

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
COLLNET Journal of Scientometrics and Information Management, Volume 7, pp 161-172; https://doi.org/10.1080/09737766.2013.832898

Abstract:
The present study aims to investigate the scientific productivity, impact and collaborations of Iranian psychology and psychiatry researchers in Web of Science using a scientometric approach. A total of 1702 documents in the area of Psychology and Psychiatry which specified Iran as their affiliated country and indexed by Thomson Reuters, were selected as the population of the study. The results of the study revealed that the number of Iranian publications is increasing over the examined years. The results of the exponential regression test reported a 10.04 percent growth rate for Iranian publications in psychology and psychiatry. The most number of papers (547) has been published in 2008. Additionally, Iranian psychology and psychiatry publications in the Web of Science have received 2.81 citations per document. Moreover, Iranian psychology and psychiatry publications have received 4802 citations from 4712 documents and 21010 researchers from Iran other countries. American researchers have most cited Iranian publications among researchers from other countries. Additionally among foreign universities which cited Iranian publications, the most number of citations was received from Harvard University. The results of the study showed that more than 20% of all publications and 30% of all citations were made by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Moreover, the analysis of the social network of co-authorship between universities using the UCINet software revealed that the Tehran University of Medical Sciences as well as the Islamic Azad University had the highest centrality degree with a value of 56 and 55, respectively. Finally, the Iranian researchers of psychology and psychiatry had collaborated with researchers from 77 countries all over the world. Among them, USA, UK and Australia were the most important collaborating partners of Iranian researchers.
, Phillip D. Rumrill
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals, Volume 36, pp 25-30; https://doi.org/10.1177/2165143413477451

Abstract:
This literature review examined publication patterns in the journal of Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals across 35 years of publication. Overall, 732 contributors affiliated with 267 organizations were identified in our analysis of 436 articles. Frequency counts identified the most productive scholars in terms of number of articles authored and their institutional affiliation. Twenty-three individuals, predominately representing colleges and universities, contributed 6 or more articles. Findings reflect the collaborative nature of scholarship in career development and transition and an overall trend toward multiple authored publications. There is a need to engage or support individuals affiliated with local or state education agencies, vocational rehabilitation, and community rehabilitation programs, or individuals working outside of the United States in generating scholarship, as these groups were underrepresented in our findings. Suggestions for increasing authorship representation reflecting all transition stakeholders and the importance of collaboration in building the transition and career development knowledge base are discussed.
John G. Adair, Cam-Loi Huynh
International Perspectives in Psychology, Volume 1, pp 252-267; https://doi.org/10.1037/a0030395

Abstract:
We undertook this study to assess whether trends toward declining U.S. dominance and increasing international authorship exist in psychology journals. We collected data on the national affiliations of authors in 16 primary and 3 secondary journals from the United States, and 4 international journals published over 3 decades. Although analyses showed the United States continued to dominate overall and in most specialties, there were significant declines in the proportion of U.S.-authored publications after the year 2000, most in experimental psychology and least within social/personality and clinical/health psychology. In primary journals, publications were largely (97.8%) from the United States, and 13 leading countries defined by publication performance: Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom (U.K.). The topic focus (on experimental psychology) of the 13 leading countries differed from that emphasized in the United States. (clinical/health psychology). Frequency of international collaborations steadily increased across the period of study, mostly among leading countries of comparable achievement, in proximity, or with similar language and culture. Research collaborations involving U.S. psychologists were more often with colleagues from other states than with those from other countries. Although the study suggests that productivity within psychology may be just as imbalanced internationally as it has been for decades, a great deal has changed: the United States is no longer seen as the sole contributor; the research of other countries, especially from Western Europe, have risen to where at least in certain fields it has taken on a larger role in shaping the direction of research.
Gregory R. Mostyn
Issues in Accounting Education, Volume 27, pp 227-245; https://doi.org/10.2308/iace-50099

Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to increase the awareness of accounting instructors, particularly those teaching introductory courses, of an important and relatively new development in cognitive psychology. This development, called cognitive load theory (CLT), both identifies the cognitive constraints of novice learners when learning complex tasks and also provides specific methods for improving learning efficiency. Despite extensive CLT research and its widespread application in the instructional design applications for many other fields, very little discussion has appeared in accounting education literature. This suggests not just an oversight, but also a great opportunity. This paper will present: (1) an overview of CLT and its use, (2) a brief history of recent learning theory and its effect on accounting education and the development of CLT, (3) a discussion of the key elements of CLT and its prescriptive research results for the classroom, and (4) suggestions for how CLT might benefit accounting research.
, , Andi J. Thacker, Laura S. Pace, Karrie L. Swan, Sarah E. Carlson, Jeffrey M. Sullivan
Journal of Counseling & Development, Volume 89, pp 349-359; https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6678.2011.tb00099.x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 11 November 2010
Educational Psychology Review, Volume 22, pp 363-374; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10648-010-9147-2

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Educational Psychology Review, Volume 22, pp 115-121; https://doi.org/10.1007/s10648-010-9133-8

Abstract:
Over the last few years, cognitive load theory has progressed and advanced rapidly. The articles in this special issue, which document those advances, are based on contributions to the 3rd International Cognitive Load Theory Conference (2009), Heerlen, The Netherlands. The articles of this special issue on cognitive load theory discuss new conceptualizations of the different categories of cognitive load, an integrated research perspective of process-oriented and cognitive load approaches to collaborative learning, an integrated research perspective of cognitive and social–cognitive approaches to example-based learning, and a specification of the theory focusing on the acquisition of generalized knowledge structures as a means to facilitate flexible problem-solving skills. This article provides a short introduction to the theory, discusses some of its recent advances, and provides an overview of the contributions to this issue.
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