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(searched for: doi:10.1016/s0959-8022(99)00018-1)
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, Gopalakrishnan Narayanamurthy, Jo Staines
Knowledge Management Research & Practice pp 1-14; https://doi.org/10.1080/14778238.2021.1909430

Abstract:
This research examines the implications of COVID-19 on the relationship between organisational learning and operational performance in service organisations. By using social learning theory and transactive memory system theory, we developed competing hypotheses on how organisational learning and COVID-19 outbreak interact with each other to explain 10 their impact on operational performance. To test our hypotheses, we surveyed 106 employees of service organisations who have been remotely working during COVID-19 outbreak. The collected data were analysed through multivariate data techniques. We specifically measured operational performance to assess the organisation’s performance as they were the ones immediately affected by the outbreak of COVID-19, which then is expected to have a lagged 15 impact on financial performance. Through exploratory factor analysis, we identified two bundles of COVID-19 work implications, namely home office work environment and social distancing. Results confirmed that home office work environment positively mediates the relationship between organisational learning and operational performance of service organisations. Our research adds to theory, since we evidenced that individuals’ behaviours and work environment reciprocally influence each other, even when individuals are actually apart from the usual work environment, asobserved during the pandemic.
Published: 6 February 2017
The Learning Organization, Volume 24, pp 134-135; https://doi.org/10.1108/tlo-02-2017-097

Published: 9 January 2017
The Learning Organization, Volume 24, pp 49-57; https://doi.org/10.1108/tlo-10-2016-0070

Abstract:
Purpose: Organizational learning and unlearning are often viewed as different and distinct concepts in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the unlearning concept and reassess its position vis-à-vis learning, in particular second-order and double-loop learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper entails a conceptual analysis. Findings: It is found that there are two conceptual problems with unlearning, and that it is best embedded in the dynamics of the learning process, where it appears to fit well in the “interruption” phase. Research limitations/implications: The research scope of the paper is limited to a theoretical analysis of organizational learning and unlearning. Implications for theory reside in the importance of unlearning and its relation to learning in current organizations. Practical implications: The paper has practical implications for organizations wishing to become more adept at learning and unlearning. Originality/value: The paper is among the first organizational papers to analyze unlearning in direct relation to different phases in the learning dynamics.
International Journal of Organizational Analysis, Volume 24, pp 573-590; https://doi.org/10.1108/ijoa-09-2014-0802

Abstract:
Purpose While intended as a bridge between the concepts of learning organization and organizational learning, current conceptualizations of organizational learning capability still predominantly lean toward the learning organization side, specifically directed at profit firms. The purpose of this paper is to propose a four-dimensional model of organization learning capability that leans more toward the organizational learning side, specifically directed at nonprofit and government organizations in general, and army organizations in particular. This model is applied to the British Army in the Second World War. Design/methodology/approach The paper entails a secondary analysis of historical and military sources and data. Findings It is found that the British Army possessed only a moderate learning capability, which can be plausibly, but not exclusively, related to differences in battlefield performance between the British and the German Army in the Second World War. Research limitations/implications The research scope of the paper is limited to the analysis of one particular army in the Second World War. Implications for theory reside in the importance of organizational learning capability and its dimensions to the effectiveness of “lessons learned” processes inside organizations. Practical implications The paper has clear practical implications for armies and organizations that resemble armies in one or more aspects, like prisons, correctional facilities, police forces, hospitals, mental institutions and fire departments. Originality/value The paper ranks among the first organizational papers to analyze army operations and functioning from the perspective of organizational learning capability.
International Journal of Production Research, Volume 53, pp 3989-4000; https://doi.org/10.1080/00207543.2014.980462

Abstract:
Despite the fact that Lean Manufacturing (LM) implementation has been widely discussed in the literature, a reduced number of works focus on medium-sized enterprises (MEs). Such gap becomes more evident when searching for works exploring the dimensions of learning organisation (DLO) that surround LM implementation in MEs. This paper aims at assessing DLO maturity and the importance of human resources management (HRM) practices in MEs that are starting LM implementation. We verify the applicability of a method for assessing maturity levels of DLO and HRM practices in seven different MEs. The method was originally conceived for large enterprises well advanced in the lean implementation process; it combines concepts of HRM and organisational learning with lean implementation roadmaps. Adapting the method for application in MEs allows such companies to anticipate and minimise organisational learning problems by conducting appropriate HRM practices, leading to a more effective LM implementation. We conclude that the method is a suitable diagnostic tool for MEs, indicating which phases of the lean roadmap are better prepared to be implemented.
Mike Chiasson, Elizabeth Davidson
European Journal of Information Systems, Volume 21, pp 192-206; https://doi.org/10.1057/ejis.2011.55

Abstract:
Deconstruction, a post-structuralist approach to examining language in texts, is most often associated with the philosophical works of Jacque Derrida. After a flurry of interest among management and information systems (IS) scholars, this qualitative approach to exploring organizational texts has received little attention in the IS literature. We suggest deconstruction could help our field explore how IS texts describe the social and technical past and also prescribe and circumscribe the future of IS practice. Thus, we suggest the IS field reconsider how deconstruction might contribute to language-based approaches in IS research and practice. In this paper, we discuss deconstruction in light of the linguistic turn in social science research and the support and criticism for its use in management research. We consider IS research publications that have employed deconstruction explicitly, examine a well-known IS publication as an example of the deconstruction of IS texts, and suggest ways in which deconstruction might be applied to various genres of IS texts to inspire insights and creativity. To conclude, we highlight considerations for researchers who might adopt this approach and for the editors and reviewers who would evaluate qualitative research papers that employ deconstruction.
Paul Tosey, , Mark Nk Saunders
Published: 2 December 2011
Management Learning, Volume 43, pp 291-307; https://doi.org/10.1177/1350507611426239

Abstract:
In the organizational learning literature a variety of concepts exists denoting some third order of organizational learning, notably that of ‘triple-loop’ learning. Despite this there has been no systematic, critical consideration of this concept or its origins, impeding both theoretical development and empirical research. Whilst ‘triple-loop learning’ has been inspired by Argyris and Schön, we establish that the term does not arise in their published work. Indeed, we argue that conceptualizations of triple-loop learning are diverse, often have little theoretical rooting, are sometimes driven by normative considerations, and lack support from empirical research. We map the major influences on these conceptualizations, including Bateson’s framework of levels of learning, and offer an original theoretical contribution that distinguishes between three conceptualizations of ‘triple-loop learning’. We also highlight implications for practice, and caution against the uncritical preference for ‘higher levels’ of learning that is sometimes discernible in the literature and in practice.
, Suliman Hawamdeh
Published: 22 February 2011
Journal of Knowledge Management, Volume 15, pp 88-103; https://doi.org/10.1108/13673271111108710

Abstract:
Purpose – This study seeks to investigate how a more lateral style of working, such as the Swedish model of management that reflects a more linear manner of managing organizational knowledge, is carried over and transferred to Swedish managed organizations in Singapore. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 33 top-level managers (23 Scandinavians and ten Asians) who worked in Swedish managed organizations in Singapore were interviewed for this study. It was necessary that the respondents were in top-level management positions, the assumption being that it was their decisions and actions that steered the organization to its goals. The respondents were selected randomly and came from a variety of industry backgrounds. Findings – The Swedish style of handling information and knowledge within the organization has proven more open, flexible and accessible than Singaporeans might initially expect or understand. This cultural difference of who gains access to timely information and who should use that information to make decisions, for example, first met with a lack of understanding and even inaction on the part of the Singaporeans and active measures are needed such as re-structuring the organization or a constant communicative strategy by the Swedes to first make a change in direction in organization behaviour. This means that the organizations in this study, in keeping a high standard of employee satisfaction, get to retain, harvest and profit from their organization's knowledge base while enjoying a low turnover rate in human capital. Originality/value – This study aims to take a complementary approach of exploring the Swedish management style via discourse analysis, with the transcribed long interview data sorted with the coding procedures adapted from grounded theory.
Jaron Harvey, Anthony Wheeler, Jonathon R.B. Halbesleben, M. Ronald Buckley
Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management, Volume 29, pp 167-200; https://doi.org/10.1108/s0742-7301(2010)0000029007

Abstract:
How did you figure that out? Employee learning during socialization
Chun-Hui Wu, Shiow-Luan Wang, Kwoting Fang
PICMET '07 - 2007 Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering & Technology pp 1083-1089; https://doi.org/10.1109/picmet.2007.4349429

Abstract:
The impact of organizational learning on project performance has received a great deal of attention in recent years. Process focus is recognized as one of five factors which help to promote organizational learning through out the process. A theoretical model is derived based upon prior researches in literature to examine the effects of organizational learning and process focus on project performance. The structural equation modeling was adopted to test the proposed hypotheses, and Taiwanese corporate IS companies served as examples. The results revealed that organization process focus has a positive impact on organizational learning, which in turn has a positive influence on project performance. Both organization process focus and organizational learning play the influence on project performance. These findings should give valuable information for managers to revisit their priorities in terms of the relative efforts in organization process focus and organization learning.
Journal of Information Technology, Volume 21, pp 40-51; https://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.jit.2000053

Abstract:
Ignoring the informal, non-canonical nature of knowledge sharing, including people's motivation, ability and opportunity to share knowledge, is one of the key causes of resistance to use knowledge-sharing tools. In order to improve knowledge sharing supported by information technology (IT), tools need to be embedded in the social networks of which it is part. This has implications for our knowledge on the design requirements of such socially embedded IT. The paper reviews tools that are designed for the purpose to foster social capital. We will then discuss what is needed for an IS design theory related to knowledge communities and how such a theory could incorporate social capital theory.
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, Volume 39, pp 269-278; https://doi.org/10.1002/jhbs.10112

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 1 July 2003
Human Relations, Volume 56, pp 839-868; https://doi.org/10.1177/00187267030567004

Abstract:
Organizational learning is a popular topic in business and academia and attracts many researchers and practitioners from different fields. Even though organizational learning scholarship is still growing, there are few studies that cross-fertilize social cognition and organizational learning. This investigation examines organizational learning from the perspective of social cognition. It is argued that social cognition explains the organizational learning process better by integrating fragmented studies on the processes of learning, and the study proposes that organizational learning is an outcome of reciprocal interactions of the processes of information/knowledge acquisition, information/knowledge dissemination, information/knowledge implementation, sensemaking, memory, thinking, unlearning, intelligence, improvisation, and emotions - connected by organizational culture. In addition, the implications of social cognition on organizational learning are discussed.
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