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Published: 30 September 2021
by MDPI
Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, Volume 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5100059

Abstract:
Understanding the behavioral dynamics that underline human-robot interactions in groups remains one of the core challenges in social robotics research. However, despite a growing interest in this topic, there is still a lack of established and validated measures that allow researchers to analyze human-robot interactions in group scenarios; and very few that have been developed and tested specifically for research conducted in-the-wild. This is a problem because it hinders the development of general models of human-robot interaction, and makes the comprehension of the inner workings of the relational dynamics between humans and robots, in group contexts, significantly more difficult. In this paper, we aim to provide a reflection on the current state of research on human-robot interaction in small groups, as well as to outline directions for future research with an emphasis on methodological and transversal issues.
, Kelly Bouas Henry
Springer Proceedings in Complexity pp 403-420; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-00075-2_18

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Published: 30 November 2018
Energy Research & Social Science, Volume 50, pp 18-28; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2018.11.008

Abstract:
Medium- and long-term planning, defined here as 10 years or longer, in the energy and water sectors is fraught with uncertainty, exacerbated by an accelerating ‘paradigm shift’. The new paradigm is characterised by a changing climate and rapid adoption of new technologies, accompanied by changes in end-use practices. Traditional methods (such as econometrics) do not incorporate these diverse and dynamic aspects and perform poorly when exploring long-term futures. This paper critiques existing methods and explores how interdisciplinary insights could provide methodological innovation for exploring future energy and water demand. The paper identifies four attributes that methods need to capture to reflect at least some of the uncertainty associated with the paradigm shift: stochastic events, the diversity of behaviour, policy interventions and the ‘co-evolution’ of the variables affecting demand. Machine-learning methods can account for some of the four identified attributes and can be further enhanced by insights from across the psychological and social sciences (human geography and sociology), incorporating rebound effect and the unevenness of demand, and acknowledging the emergent nature of demand. The findings have implications for urban and regional planning of infrastructure and contribute to current debates on nexus thinking for energy and water resource management.
, , Georgina Randsley De Moura
Published: 25 March 2018
Journal of Social Issues, Volume 74, pp 8-19; https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12253

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michael A. Hogg,
Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience pp 1-34; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119170174.epcn414

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
The Blackwell Handbook of Principles of Organizational Behaviour pp 205-218; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781405164047.ch14

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Michael A. Hogg
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 20, pp 561-569; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430217709536

Abstract:
The 20th anniversary of Group Processes & Intergroup Relations offers an opportunity to reflect on progress in research. We describe the changing context of research and the scope and progress in the field. This special issue includes reviews by distinguished scholars in the areas of social identity, ideology, crowds, intergroup contact, crossed and multiple social categorization, communication, majority–minority conflict, group-based emotion, group decision making, group performance, ostracism, and social-cognitive development. Achievements and current knowledge in all of these areas are raising significant new questions, challenges, and opportunities for future research, strongly demonstrating the growing scientific strength and societal relevance of research in group processes and intergroup relations.
, Dominic Abrams, Marilynn B. Brewer
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 20, pp 570-581; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430217690909

Abstract:
Applications and conceptual developments made in social identity research since the mid-1990s are summarized under eight general headings: types of self and identity, prototype-based differentiation, influence through leadership, social identity motivations, intergroup emotions, intergroup conflict and social harmony, collective behavior and social protest, and resolving social dilemmas. Cautious prognoses for future directions are then suggested—health, e-behavior, population relocation and immigration, culture, language and intergroup communication, societal extremism and populism, social development, and inclusive and diverse social identities.
, Carolyn Axtell, Stephen McGlynn
Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Volume 46, pp 3-6; https://doi.org/10.1111/jasp.12363

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 19, pp 137-151; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430215612217

Abstract:
Many of the world’s biggest problems are being tackled through the formation of new groups yet very little research has directly observed the processes by which new groups form to respond to social problems. The current paper draws on seminal research by Lewin (1947) to advance a perspective as to how such identities form through processes of small group interaction. Multilevel structural equation modelling involving 58 small group discussions (with N = 234) demonstrates that focused group discussion can boost the commitment to take collective action, beliefs in the efficacy of that action, and members’ social identification with other supporters of the cause. The results are consistent with the new commitment to action flowing from emergent social identities.
Yi-Ching Liu, Poppy Lauretta McLeod, Ozias A. Moore
Published: 31 August 2015
Small Group Research, Volume 46, pp 536-575; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496415599662

Abstract:
This review illuminated the need for interdisciplinary integration of research on personality and groups. Network analysis of references cited in 13 previous reviews showed that this literature is fragmented; the disciplinary base has narrowed over time; is dominated by psychology, organization studies, and small group studies; and is poorly integrated with other relevant disciplines. Research from an additional seven disciplines is reviewed. Insights from the review help to identify new research directions, based on reconsidering assumptions about the temporal nature and direction of personality causality and the locus of group interaction. Implications for research practices are discussed.
Published: 31 August 2015
Small Group Research, Volume 46, pp 589-622; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496415602778

Abstract:
In the literature, the notion of the ever-growing prevalence of teamwork is dominating. First, has there indeed been a steadily increasing trajectory of the societal diffusion of and academic research on teamwork? If so, what have the main drivers of this trajectory been? In this review, we apply a multi-method approach to examine these questions. Specifically, we combine the established bibliometric method of scholarly article counts with the innovative approach of culturomics that allows the content analysis of a literature corpus spanning millions of books, both popular and scholarly. The results show that although academic research on teamwork has grown constantly and has shown a sharp increase over the past 40 years, the societal diffusion of teamwork, as indicated through the culturomics approach, actually followed a volatile trend in the past century. Certain large-scale events and developments, such as war, may serve as an explanation for these changing trends.
, David Krackhardt, , Tat Koon Koh
Published: 1 July 2014
Small Group Research, Volume 45, pp 471-505; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496414537689

Abstract:
We examine the effect of friendship in triads on retaliatory responses to unfair outcomes that originate from a group member. Drawing on Simmel’s classic discussion of relationships in social triads versus dyads, we hypothesized that the effect of unfairness on retaliation between friends is stronger when the third party in the triad is a mutual friend, rather than a stranger. We also draw on social categorization theory to hypothesize that the effect of unfairness on retaliation between strangers is stronger when the third party is a friend of that stranger than when the triad consists of all strangers. Hypotheses were tested in an experiment where participants negotiated with one another in a three-person exchange network. The results supported our hypothesis that between friends, the increase in retaliation was stronger following an unfair deal when third parties were mutual friends, rather than strangers.
, Jay J. Van Bavel
Perspectives on Psychological Science, Volume 9, pp 245-274; https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691614527464

Abstract:
We review emerging research on the psychological and biological factors that underlie social group formation, cooperation, and conflict in humans. Our aim is to integrate the intergroup neuroscience literature with classic theories of group processes and intergroup relations in an effort to move beyond merely describing the effects of specific social out-groups on the brain and behavior. Instead, we emphasize the underlying psychological processes that govern intergroup interactions more generally: forming and updating our representations of “us” and “them” via social identification and functional relations between groups. This approach highlights the dynamic nature of social identity and the context-dependent nature of intergroup relations. We argue that this theoretical integration can help reconcile seemingly discrepant findings in the literature, provide organizational principles for understanding the core elements of intergroup dynamics, and highlight several exciting directions for future research at the interface of intergroup relations and neuroscience.
Paul E. Stillman, Thomas Gilovich, Kentaro Fujita
Published: 1 February 2014
Social Cognition, Volume 32, pp 71-82; https://doi.org/10.1521/soco.2014.32.1.71

Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research pp 533-561; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6772-0_18

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 16, pp 3-16; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430212462497

Abstract:
Although leadership is fundamentally a social psychological (and group) phenomenon, interest in the social psychology of leadership has waxed and waned over the years. The present article briefly reviews this chequered history and then discusses recent theoretical and empirical developments that extend the study of social cognition and social identity to the domain of leadership. In addition, we consider how the eight empirical articles that constitute this Special Issue relate to, and further, the study of leadership as a group process, and conclude by identifying fertile areas for future research.
, Michael Cavanagh
Psychology of Well-Being: Theory, Research and Practice, Volume 3; https://doi.org/10.1186/2211-1522-3-2

Abstract:
Background\ud It has been argued that the quality of daily interactions within organisations effects the wellbeing of both individuals and the broader organisation. Coaching for leadership development is one intervention often used to create organisation-wide changes in culture and wellbeing. Leadership style has been associated with employee stress and wellbeing. Coaching has also been shown to improve individual level measures of wellbeing. However, almost all the research into the effectiveness of coaching interventions assumes a linear model of change, and expects that any flow-on effects are also linear. In other words, much of the research assumed that any change in the leader has relatively uniform effects on the wellbeing of others, and that these effects can be adequately accessed via standard linear statistical analyses. We argue that linear approaches do not take the complexity of organisations seriously, and that Complex Adaptive Systems theory (CAS) provides a useful non-linear approach to thinking about organisational change and the wellbeing of individuals embedded in these systems. The relatively new methodology of Social Network Analysis (SNA) provides researchers with analytic tools designed to access the relational components of complex systems. This paper reports on changes observed in the relational networks of an organisation following a leadership coaching intervention.\ud \ud Methods\ud An AB design coaching intervention study was conducted across an organisation (N = 225). Wellbeing measures were taken for all employees and a social network analysis was conducted on the degree and quality of all organisational interactions. Twenty leaders (n = 20) received 8 coaching sessions. Individual self report measures of goal attainment as well as 360 feedbacks on transformational leadership were assessed in the control, pre and post intervention periods.\ud \ud Results\ud A significant increase in the goal attainment, transformational leadership and psychological wellbeing measures were observed for those who received coaching. Average change in the perceived quality of interaction improved for those who received coaching. However there was a decline in the perceived quality of the interaction others believed they were having with those who were coached. It was also found that the closer any member of the network was identified as being connected to those who received coaching, the more likely they were to experience positive increases in wellbeing.\ud \ud Conclusions\ud This research highlights the influence of leadership coaching beyond the individual leader, and has important implications for organisational wellbeing initiatives and how we measure the impact of interventions aimed at organisational change. Our findings suggest a more nuanced approach is needed in designing interventions in complex adaptive systems.Psycholog
John A. Bargh, Lisa Feldman Barrett, Veronica Benet-Martínez, Elliot T. Berkman, Jim Blascovich, Marilynn B. Brewer, Heining Cham, Tanya L. Chartrand, Robert B. Cialdini, William D. Crano, et al.
Handbook of Research Methods in Social and Personality Psychology; https://doi.org/10.1017/cbo9780511996481

Abstract:
This indispensable sourcebook covers conceptual and practical issues in research design in the field of social and personality psychology. Key experts address specific methods and areas of research, contributing to a comprehensive overview of contemporary practice. This updated and expanded second edition offers current commentary on social and personality psychology, reflecting the rapid development of this dynamic area of research over the past decade. With the help of this up-to-date text, both seasoned and beginning social psychologists will be able to explore the various tools and methods available to them in their research as they craft experiments and imagine new methodological possibilities.
, Daan Van Knippenberg,
European Review of Social Psychology, Volume 23, pp 258-304; https://doi.org/10.1080/10463283.2012.741134

Abstract:
Over the past decade the social identity theory of leadership (Hogg, 2001a; Hogg & van Knippenberg, 2003) has reinvigorated social psychological research on leadership by reconnecting leadership to the social psychology of influence, and by explicitly elaborating on the (social) identity function, and associated social cognitive and social interactive processes, associated with leadership. The main tenet is that group prototypical leaders are better supported and more trusted, and are perceived as more effective by members than are less prototypical leaders; particularly when group membership is a central and salient aspect of members’ identity and members identify strongly with the group. This hypothesis has attracted unequivocal support across numerous studies, research teams, and research paradigms. In this article we describe the social identity theory of leadership and its conceptual origins, and overview the state of evidence. The main focus of the article is on new conceptual developments and associated empirical advances; including the moderating roles of uncertainty, group innovation and creativity, deviance, “norm talk”, charisma, fairness, as well as the extension of the social identity theory of leadership to an intergroup context. Throughout we identify directions for future empirical and conceptual advances.
, , Peter M. Gollwitzer
The American Journal of Psychology, Volume 125, pp 275-90; https://doi.org/10.5406/amerjpsyc.125.3.0275

Abstract:
In celebration of the 125th anniversary of The American Journal of Psychology, this article discusses a seminal publication by Marjorie Shaw (1932) on small group performance in the rational solution of complex problems. We then propose an approach for the effective regulation of group goal striving based on the collective action control perspective. From this perspective, group performance might be hindered by a collective intention-behavior gap: Groups fail to act on their intentions despite being strongly committed to the collective goal, knowing what the necessary actions are, and being capable of performing them. To reduce this gap, we suggest specific if-then plans (implementation intentions) in which groups specify when, where, and how to act toward their collective goal as an easily applicable self-regulation strategy to automate collective action control. Studies in which implementation intentions improved group performance in hidden profile, escalation of commitment, and cooperation task paradigms are reported and discussed.
Tanya Menon, Katherine W. Phillips
Organization Science, Volume 22, pp 738-753; https://doi.org/10.1287/orsc.1100.0535

Abstract:
We propose that even-sized small groups often experience lower cohesion than odd-sized small groups. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate this effect within three- to six-person groups of freshman roommates and sibling groups, respectively. Study 3 replicates the basic even/odd effect among three- to five-person groups in a laboratory experiment that examines underlying mechanisms. To account for the even/odd effect, Study 3 focuses on the group's ability to provide members with certainty and identifies majority influence as the key instrument. We argue that groups struggle to provide certainty when they lack majorities (e.g., deadlocked coalitions) or contain unstable majorities (i.e., where small changes in opinion readily overturn existing power arrangements). Member uncertainty mediated the effects of coalition structure on cohesion. The results link structural variables (i.e., even/odd size and coalition structure) to psychological outcomes (i.e., member uncertainty and relational outcomes).
, Robert E. Sanders
Published: 29 December 2010
Small Group Research, Volume 42, pp 343-358; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496410385472

Abstract:
In every society groups rather than individuals are given responsibility for producing results that individuals potentially could produce just as well, but without the benefits of group effort. Once a small discussion group is convened, the members can be counted on to interact, often at length and sometimes contentiously, incontrovertible evidence that their interaction accomplishes something over and above what comes about because of characteristics of the task, cognitive processing, and context. And in order for members to achieve the collaboration and interdependence that make them a group rather than co-present individuals, they must interact. Hence, it is essential for small group researchers to examine behavioral data (by which we mean interactional conduct) if we are to understand what gives small groups the distinct utilities with which they are credited. This position does not mean that individual motivation, cognition and information processing, and other related phenomena should be ignored. It means rather that these matters are secondary to and contingent on interactional conduct and processes.
Steven L. Neuberg, Douglas T. Kenrick, Mark Schaller
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
J. Richard Hackman, Nancy Katz
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michael A. Hogg
The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Kipling D. Williams
Published: 18 February 2010
Small Group Research, Volume 41, pp 268-274; https://doi.org/10.1177/1046496409358619

Abstract:
Moreland eloquently argues for excluding dyads from group process research and theory. Although dyads can have properties that do not lend themselves to certain group process research (e.g., coalition formation) and have properties that can go beyond typical group processes (e.g., intimate relations and love), in most instances dyads are groups of two and operate under the same principles and theories that explain group processes for groups of three and larger. In this article, the author presents research and theory that support the inclusion of dyads as groups.
Dominique Oberlé, Benoît Testé
La psychologie sociale : applicabilité et applications pp 33-54; https://doi.org/10.4000/books.pur.60713

Abstract:
Remerciements : Nous tenons à remercier très chaleureusement le professeur Eugène Enriquez pour l’entretien qu’il a bien voulu accorder à l’un d’entre nous et les précieuses informations qu’il a fournies à cette occasion.
Serge Guimond
Social Comparison and Social Psychology pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1017/cbo9780511584329.002

Abstract:
“I do not know how far I differ from other people. That is another memoir writer's difficulty. Yet to describe oneself truly one must have some standard of comparison; was I clever, stupid, good looking, ugly, passionate, cold –? Owing partly to the fact that I was never at school, never competed in any way with children of my own age, I have never been able to compare my gifts and defects with other people's” (Virginia Woolf, A sketch of the past, autobiographical writings of 1939) Fifty years ago, Festinger (1954) published a Theory of social comparison processes. Today, thirty-five social and cognitive psychologists who share a common interest in comparison processes combined their efforts to make this new book on the same topic a reality. Few theories in social psychology have stood the test of time as successfully as the theory of social comparison. Even today, major theoretical and empirical papers on social comparison processes are being published in the best scientific journals (for example, Buunk and Ybema, 2003; Markman and McMullen, 2003; Mugny, Butera, Quiamzade, Dragulescu and Tomei, 2003; Mussweiler, 2003; Spears, Gordijn, Dijksterhuis and Stapel, 2004; Stapel and Suls, 2004 and many others). How can one explain the tremendous amount of research that continues to investigate the psychological role of social comparison? What makes social comparison so important? These questions will be answered in the following chapters. However, this book is not “only” about social comparison. It is also about social psychology.
, Johann Louw
International Journal of Psychology, Volume 44, pp 46-59; https://doi.org/10.1080/00207590701390933

Abstract:
The late Henri Tajfel (1919–1982) is one of the central figures who shaped the development of post‐war European social psychology. His contributions range from the establishment of an infrastructure for a European social psychology, and the start of a new intellectual movement within social psychology, to the formulation of a set of concepts addressing intergroup relations that were finally integrated into Social Identity Theory. The present study provides an empirical examination of Tajfel's contribution to intergroup research over the last 30 years via a citation analysis of five journals: the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the British Journal of Social Psychology, the European Journal of Social Psychology, the South African Journal of Psychology, and the German Journal of Social Psychology (Zeitschrift für Sozialpsychologie). The results indicate that Tajfel's work on intergroup relations is increasingly cited, especially since the 1990s, and the international recognition of his work is substantial. Three possible reasons for the recognition his work still enjoys are proposed: its potential to generate theoretical and empirical controversies; its explanatory power; and the extent to which his work is used as a referential framework.
Richard P. McGlynn, Deborah Jean Harding, Jacquline L. Cottle
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 12, pp 129-143; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430208098781

Abstract:
The consistent finding that interactions involving groups are more competitive than interactions between individuals is known as the discontinuity effect. We investigated the effects of group size in order to determine whether the effect is a true discontinuity or a continuous function of group size. We also asked whether dyads behave like larger groups. Four hundred and eighty seven students volunteered for the experiment. Individuals played 10 trials of two-choice prisoner's dilemmas against other individuals or against groups of sizes two through eight. Major findings included (a) individual–individual interactions were more cooperative than individual–group interactions, but there were no differences among group sizes; (b) dyads were indistinguishable from larger groups; and (c) data on expectations revealed that, before interacting, groups were not only distrusted by individuals but also distrusted the individuals. The discontinuity between individuals and groups–including dyads–appears to be a true discontinuity.
, Brandy Doan, Richard M. Cullen, Jennifer M. Kavanagh,
Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, Volume 24, pp 45-50; https://doi.org/10.1007/s11896-008-9032-9

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Tanya Menon, Katherine Williams Phillips
Published: 9 November 2008
SSRN Electronic Journal; https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1298497

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Tirza Leader, Joseph Pelletier,
Group Processes & Intergroup Relations, Volume 11, pp 575-596; https://doi.org/10.1177/1368430208095406

Abstract:
Three archival analyses are presented substantially extending empirical reviews of the progress of group-related research. First, an analysis of social psychological research from 1935 to 2007 (cf. Abrams & Hogg, 1998) showed that group-related research has a steadily increasing proportion of titles in the principal journals and currently accounts for over a sixth of all the research in our list of social psychological journals. Second, analysis of the most cited papers from a set of principal social psychology journals from 1998 to 2007 showed that a third of high-impact articles in social psychology focus on groups. Third, analysis of the content of two major specialist journals in the field, Group Processes & Intergroup Relations and Group Dynamics: Theory, Research, and Practice, showed that together these journals cover a broad range of group-related research, and that the only keyword common to both journals was social identity. These findings demonstrate the health and major contributions of research into group processes and intergroup relations to social psychology as a whole.
Jeanne M. Wilson, Paul S. Goodman, Matthew A. Cronin
Academy of Management Review, Volume 32, pp 1041-1059; https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.2007.26585724

Abstract:
We clarify the construct of group learning, encouraging new directions for research. Definitions of group learning vary considerably across studies, making it difficult to systematically accumulate evidence. To reconcile disparate approaches, we first present a set of features for distinguishing group learning from other concepts. We then develop a framework for understanding group learning that focuses on learning's basic processes at the group level of analysis: sharing, storage, and retrieval. By doing so, we define the construct space, identify gaps in current treatments of group learning, and illuminate new possibilities for measurement.
Wolfgang Schöll
Zeitschrift für Sozialpsychologie, Volume 38, pp 285-296; https://doi.org/10.1024/0044-3514.38.4.285

Abstract:
Zusammenfassung: Die psychologische Sozialpsychologie hat sich zu einer relativ individualistischen Disziplin entwickelt, in der das “Soziale” zunehmend verkürzt wurde. Es wird gezeigt, dass Themen, die die wechselseitige Interaktion und Kommunikation zwischen Individuen betreffen und in die konkrete Sozialstruktur und Kultur einbetten, zu wenig in Forschung und Lehre angegangen werden. Darunter leiden auch die wechselseitige Befruchtung mit den Nachbarwissenschaften und die Nützlichkeit der psychologischen Sozialpsychologie für die Praxis. Eine stärkere Ausarbeitung und Verknüpfung der interaktiven Paradigmen der Austauschtheorien und des symbolischen Interaktionismus untereinander und mit dem Social-Cognition-Paradigma könnte die individualistische Verkürzung korrigieren und die psychologische Sozialpsychologie sozialer, interdisziplinärer und anwendbarer machen.
, Daniel R. Ilgen
Psychological Science in the Public Interest, Volume 7, pp 77-124; https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1529-1006.2006.00030.x

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Michael A. Hogg, , , , Emily Russell, Alicia Svensson
Published: 31 August 2006
The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 17, pp 335-350; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2006.04.007

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
Personality and Social Psychology Review, Volume 9, pp 156-182; https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327957pspr0902_4

Abstract:
This review highlights the value of empirical investigations examining actual interactions that occur between stigmatizers and targets, and is intended to stimulate and help guide research of this type. We identify trends in the literature demonstrating that research studying ongoing interactions between stigmatizers and targets is relatively less common than in the past. Interactive studies are challenging, complex, and have variables that are sometimes more difficult to control; yet, they offer unique insights and significant contributions to understanding stigma-related phenomena that may not be offered in other (e.g., self-report) paradigms. This article presents a conceptual and empirical overview of stigma research, delineates the unique contributions that have been made by conducting interactive studies, and proposes what can be further learned by conducting more of such research.
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