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(searched for: doi:10.1080/10810730500461042)
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, , Katie J. Schmitz, Evan K. Perrault
Journal of Health Communication, Volume 26, pp 28-38; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2021.1879320

Abstract:
This study presents data from a content analysis of original research articles published in Journal of Health Communication (JOHC) andHealth Communication (HC) from 2010 to 2019. The authors coded 2,050 articles using categories that identified health topics, theory, population characteristics, and methods used in each study. Distinctions between the published research in JOHCand HCare highlighted. Across both journals, articles are primarily conducted within the United States, most frequently use college student samples, often lack explicit theoretical frameworks, heavily rely on online survey methods, and most commonly use quantitative methodologies. The most frequently utilized theory across both journals wasSocial Cognitive Theory and the most studied health topic were behaviors related to smoking, tobacco, and e-cigarette use. The journals were significantly different in several areas, with HC containing more articles explicitly guided by theory and publishing more qualitative research, while JOHC had more racial diversity in its study samples. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research. Increased diversity in methodology and samples, as well as increased use of theory and continued use of interdisciplinary collaborations among researchers will allow for expanding and enhancing health communication knowledge going forward.
, Emily Finne, Alexander Ort
Handbuch der Gesundheitskommunikation pp 29-41; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10727-7_3

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Elena Link
Handbuch der Gesundheitskommunikation pp 147-158; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10727-7_12

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
International Journal of Mental Health, Volume 48, pp 106-132; https://doi.org/10.1080/00207411.2019.1616352

Abstract:
Mental health disorders are among the leading causes of disease and long-term disability globally and, therefore, are one of the greatest challenges for public health. Modern approaches to mental health care (MHC) promote the reduction of inpatient bed numbers in favor of flexible community and outpatient services; however, the implementation of these policies requires significant cultural, conceptual, and structural changes. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, and the inevitable repercussions in Russian MHC that followed, major public sector and social transformations occurred. The purpose of this article is to understand the development of Russian MHC after this collapse–-the main tendencies, priorities, and directions; what was neglected; and how differing levels of transformation affected the system. Two main coordinated systems have been used to support the research aims: European models of care and the Soviet model. To fully understand the current situation of MHC in Russia, an analysis of relevant policy documents, special programs, laws, and scientific literature was conducted. The results indicate that on a discursive level the MHC delivery system in contemporary Russia is developing towards more modern models and principles. However, there has been a fairly constant “tendency to ignore” some important topics: stigma, social inclusion, independent living of patients, etc. Furthermore, it seems that the Russian MHC system is still dominated by psychiatrists, and cooperation with other specialists in state care and health professionals from private practices and NGOs is not common.
Handbuch Geschichte der deutschsprachigen Soziologie pp 1-13; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10948-6_3-1

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, Elena Link
Springer Reference Sozialwissenschaften pp 1-12; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-658-10948-6_12-1

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Anja Svejgaard Pors
Journal of Health Organization and Management, Volume 30, pp 279-298; https://doi.org/10.1108/jhom-12-2014-0216

Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine how strategic, patient-centred communication plays a part in the discursive management of expectations posed to patients and healthcare organizations. Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides an analysis of four documents collected as part of an ethnographic case study regarding “The Perspective of the Patient” – a Danish Hospital’s patient-centred communication programme. Mapping methods inspired by Grounded Theory are used to qualify the analysis. Findings – The paper shows that strategic patient-centred communication addresses both a care-oriented approach to the patient and deploys market perceptions of patients. Market and care is seen as co-existing organizing modes that entail expectations to the patient. In the communication programme the patient is constructed in six information-seeking patient figures: affective patient; target group patient; citizen with rights; patient as a competent resource; user as active partner; and consumer. As a result, the patient-centred communication programme renders the patient as a flexible figure able to fit organizational demands of both care orientation and market concerns. Originality/value – This study contributes to qualitative research in organizational health communication by combining two subfields – patient-centredness and health communication – in an empirical study of how market and care are intertwined in a patient-centred communication programme. The argument goes beyond the prevalent prescriptive approaches to patient-centredness and healthcare communication, instead providing a critical analytical perspective on strategic communication and patient-centredness and showing how expectations are posed to both patient and organization.
Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Volume 34, pp 621-639; https://doi.org/10.1177/0261927x15587015

Abstract:
By emphasizing the value of health professionals’ communication skills in creating positive health care experiences, researchers have tended to study health communication as an interpersonal encounter. Interactions in the health context, though, are inherently intergroup. Using the language and social psychology approach, this study emphasizes those intergroup features of health communication. We used mixed methods and applied communication accommodation theory and the willingness to communicate construct to the health context. Participants in Canada and Australia ( N = 371) were asked about their perceptions of their health consultations. Multiple regression analyses revealed that health communication competence was the best predictor of patient willingness to communicate. Differences between patients’ accounts of positive and negative health care experiences were clearly differentiated by their perceptions of the health professionals’ communication strategies. The potential effects of these strategies on patient participation are discussed.
Journal of Health Communication, Volume 20, pp 521-530; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2014.999891

Abstract:
This empirical investigation addresses four paradigmatically framed research questions to illuminate the epistemological status of the field of health communication, systematically addressing the limitations of existing disciplinary introspections. A content analysis of published health communication research indicated that the millennium marked a new stage of health communication research with a visible shift onto macro-level communication of health information among nonhealth professionals. The analysis also revealed the emergence of a paradigm around this particular topic area, with its contributing scholars predominantly sharing postpositivistic thought traditions and cross-sectional survey-analytic methodologies. More interdisciplinary collaborations and meta-theoretical assessments are needed to facilitate a continued growth of this evolving paradigm, which may advance health communication scholars in their search for a disciplinary identity.
Published: 17 December 2013
Health Communication, Volume 29, pp 955-961; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2013.814959

Abstract:
The interdisciplinary intersections between communication science and health-related fields are pervasive, with numerous differences in regard to epistemology, career planning, funding perspectives, educational goals, and cultural orientations. This article identifies and elaborates on these challenges with illustrative examples. Furthermore, concrete suggestions for future scholarship are recommended to facilitate compatible, coherent, and interdisciplinary health communication inquiry. The authors hope that this article helps current and future generations of health communication scholars to make more informed decisions when facing some of the challenges discussed in this article so that they will be able to seize the interdisciplinary and international potential of this unique and important field of study.
, Christine Deeter, Anne Trelstad, Matthew Hawk, Grace Ingram, Annie Ramirez
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, Volume 6, pp 317-333; https://doi.org/10.1080/17513057.2013.787112

Abstract:
Research about African communication and studies by African-affiliated authors remain scarce in the field of communication. To establish a comprehensive picture of the state of scholarship, 5,228 articles published in 18 top communication journals between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed. Articles were coded for topic nation, author affiliation, article type, category of communication studied, and research method. Thirty-nine Africa-focused articles including 25 authored by researchers from African institutions were found. Over half addressed health communication; most focused on Kenya and South Africa. Means are suggested by which the international scholarly community can partner to encourage African scholarship.
, , Jessica Russell, Kami Silk
Journal of Health Communication, Volume 18, pp 223-240; https://doi.org/10.1080/10810730.2012.688253

Abstract:
This study presents data from a content analysis of original research articles published in Health Communication and Journal of Health Communication from 2000 to 2009. The authors coded 776 articles using categories that identified health topics, theory, population characteristics, and methods used in each study. Distinctions between the published research in Health Communication and Journal of Health Communication are highlighted. Across both journals, findings demonstrated articles sometimes lack racial demographic information, primarily perform research in the United States, rely heavily on survey data, and often lack a theoretical framework. The top physical health topic addressed across both journals was cancer, and the top non–physical health topic addressed was the role of media in health. Journals displayed differences in several areas and those differences often mirrored each journal's stated objectives. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for expanding health communication research to be reflective of issues salient to public health within the United States and around the world.
Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Volume 147, pp 841-847; https://doi.org/10.1177/0194599812454405

Abstract:
Objective Determine current health services research (HSR) publication trends in major general otolaryngology journals. Study Design Bibliometric analysis. Methods All main issues of 8 high-impact general-interest otolaryngology journals published worldwide in 2002, 2005, 2008, and 2011 were searched for HSR-related publications. To qualify as HSR, the abstract of the article must discuss access to care, cost, delivery of care, financing, health organizational or system issues, quality of care, resource utilization, and/or health outcomes. Otolaryngology topics were classified as general, pediatrics, oncology, otology and neurotology, sleep disorders, sinonasal disease, facial plastics, and/or laryngology. Other key measures included study authorship and external sponsorship or mechanism of support. Results Of 5958 total articles, 449 (7.5%) qualified as HSR. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of HSR publications across all journals from 2002 to 2011 ( P < .001). Outcomes research (337, 75.1%) was the most common type of HSR being published. The most common subject was oncology (112, 24.9%), whereas the least represented was trauma and facial plastics (4, 0.9%). First and corresponding authors were based in 31 countries, although the United States was the predominant country of origin. Nearly 95% of HSR articles in the current sample demonstrated multidisciplinary authorship. An estimated 22.9% of first authors and 17.8% of corresponding authors were female. Two-thirds of HSR publications reported no external sponsor, whereas the remainder was supported most commonly by philanthropy and hospital-based sources. Conclusion Health services research is an international, multidisciplinary field of inquiry with an increasing presence in major otolaryngology journals.
Thomas Tufte
The Handbook of Global Health Communication pp 608-622; https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118241868.ch29

The publisher has not yet granted permission to display this abstract.
, Marcos Kreinacke, , Mei Song, Jean A O'donnell, Amit Archaya, Qing Zeng, Alla Keselman
Journal of Medical Internet Research, Volume 13; https://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.1799

Abstract:
Background: An Internet mailing list may be characterized as a virtual community of practice that serves as an information hub with easy access to expert advice and opportunities for social networking. We are interested in mining messages posted to a list for dental practitioners to identify clinical topics. Once we understand the topical domain, we can study dentists’ real information needs and the nature of their shared expertise, and can avoid delivering useless content at the point of care in future informatics applications. However, a necessary first step involves developing procedures to identify messages that are worth studying given our resources for planned, labor-intensive research. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to develop a workflow for finding a manageable number of clinically relevant messages from a much larger corpus of messages posted to an Internet mailing list, and to demonstrate the potential usefulness of our procedures for investigators by retrieving a set of messages tailored to the research question of a qualitative research team. Methods: We mined 14,576 messages posted to an Internet mailing list from April 2008 to May 2009. The list has about 450 subscribers, mostly dentists from North America interested in clinical practice. After extensive preprocessing, we used the Natural Language Toolkit to identify clinical phrases and keywords in the messages. Two academic dentists classified collocated phrases in an iterative, consensus-based process to describe the topics discussed by dental practitioners who subscribe to the list. We then consulted with qualitative researchers regarding their research question to develop a plan for targeted retrieval. We used selected phrases and keywords as search strings to identify clinically relevant messages and delivered the messages in a reusable database. Results: About half of the subscribers (245/450, 54.4%) posted messages. Natural language processing (NLP) yielded 279,193 clinically relevant tokens or processed words (19% of all tokens). Of these, 2.02% (5634 unique tokens) represent the vocabulary for dental practitioners. Based on pointwise mutual information score and clinical relevance, 325 collocated phrases (eg, fistula filled obturation and herpes zoster) with 108 keywords (eg, mercury) were classified into 13 broad categories with subcategories. In the demonstration, we identified 305 relevant messages (2.1% of all messages) over 10 selected categories with instances of collocated phrases, and 299 messages (2.1%) with instances of phrases or keywords for the category systemic disease. Conclusions: A workflow with a sequence of machine-based steps and human classification of NLP-discovered phrases can support researchers who need to identify relevant messages in a much larger corpus. Discovered phrases and keywords are useful search strings to aid targeted retrieval. We demonstrate the potential value of our procedures for qualitative researchers by retrieving a manageable set of messages concerning systemic and oral disease. [J Med Internet Res 2011;13(4):e98]
, Simone Teel
Published: 28 April 2011
Health Communication, Volume 26, pp 615-620; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2011.560798

Abstract:
Little research has been conducted within the field of communication regarding the intersection of religious faith and health communication. One step toward addressing the existing gap in health communication literature is to establish an accurate picture of the present state of affairs. The purpose of this study was to describe publication patterns in communication journals over the past 10 years with respect to the intersection and faith and health communication. We conducted a content analysis on four broad-based communication journals that have been identified as central in the communication field, and two health communication journals. We present results regarding specific health conditions, nationalities, faith communities, channels of communication, domains of religion, and purposes of communication studied; methods used; trends in publication across time and communication journals; and comparison to other disciplines.
Revista Española de Documentación Científica, Volume 33, pp 553-581; https://doi.org/10.3989/redc.2010.4.756

Abstract:
La evolución de los parámetros de publicación científi ca y de las exigencias de la carrera académica en España ha provocado cambios en las revistas científi cas y, entre ellas, las de comunicación. Este artículo caracteriza las revistas nucleares españolas en el ámbito de la comunicación a través de variables como el volumen de artículos publicados, el idioma empleado, la procedencia y las redes de colaboración de sus autores o los patrones de citación en el período 2007-2008. Mediante técnicas bibliométricas y el análisis de redes sociales se obtiene un perfi l que muestra las similitudes y las diferencias entre las diferentes revistas y el perfi l del conjunto del sistema.The evolution of parameters for scholarly publications and of academic requirements in Spain has resulted in changes to scholarly journals, among others, those in the fi eld of communication sciences. This article characterizes the core Spanish communication journals according to variables such as the number of published articles, language, author institution and collaboration networks, and citation patterns during 2007-2008. By applying bibliometric techniques and social network analysis, a profile showing similarities and differences among the journals is obtained, as well as a profile of the overall system
Published: 31 August 2010
Health Communication, Volume 25, pp 516-521; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2010.496604

Abstract:
Citation data from 2006 through 2008 were used to examine the journal citation network of Health Communication in comparison to 26 related journals indexed by Journal Citation Reports, a database published by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge. A recently advanced journal relatedness factor based on out-degree (i.e., cited journals) and in-degree (i.e., citing journals) citations was used to determine the network of peer journals. Results indicate Health Communication serves to link communication and health-related journals. Data were also reported on journal impact and 5-year journal impact factors. When compared to ISI-indexed communication journals, Health Communication is consistently ranked in the top 25% across impact factors and citations to the journal are consistent over the 7 years of analysis from 2002 through 2008. Methods of increasing the impact of Health Communication among journals in social sciences are discussed.
, Seong-Cheol Park, Sun-Wook Yoo,
Published: 31 August 2010
Health Communication, Volume 25, pp 487-503; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2010.507160

Abstract:
This study analyzed trends and patterns in the 22 years of research published in Health Communication. A content analysis of 642 articles examined the breadth and depth that Health Communication has achieved since its inception. Readers of Health Communication can thus see the history and scope of health communication as defined in the pages of this journal, and juxtapose this historical overview in the backdrop of the current scholarship that appears in the journal. We also identified some notable trends in research for the future development of the journal Health Communication specifically and the health communication discipline in general.
, Nancy Blake
Published: 30 July 2010
Health Communication, Volume 25, pp 387-396; https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2010.483333

Abstract:
Content analysis is a research method that was traditionally utilized by communication scholars, but as the study of media messages has grown, scholars in other fields have increasingly relied on the methodology. This paper reports on a systematic review of studies using quantitative content analysis methods to examine health messages in the mass media, excluding the Internet, from 1985 to 2005. We searched for health-related content analysis studies published in peer-reviewed journals, identifying 441 articles meeting inclusion criteria. We examined article attributes including theories used, topics, media type, and intercoder reliability measures, and looked at differences over time. Our findings show that studies focusing on health-related messages increased from 1985 to 2005. During this time, studies primarily examined magazines, television, and newspapers, with an emphasis on topics related to substance use, violence, sex, and obesity and body image. Results suggest that studies published in communication journals are significantly more likely to include intercoder reliability data and theory discussion. We recommend that all publications, regardless of discipline or impact factor, request the inclusion of intercoder reliability data reported for individual variables, and suggest that authors address theoretical concepts when appropriate. We also encourage authors to include the term “content analysis,” as well as media type and health topic studied, as keywords to make it easier to locate articles of interest when conducting literature searches.
, Tammy L. Smith, Paul A. Estabrooks, , Erica F. Ferro, Russell E. Glasgow
Published: 30 December 2008
Health Promotion Practice, Volume 11, pp 675-684; https://doi.org/10.1177/1524839908324778

Abstract:
The aim of this article is to describe the process of using theory to form strategies for a generalizable smoking reduction intervention delivered through multiple intervention modalities. This report describes the process of integrating theory, data from diverse sources, staff from three different organizations, and different intervention modalities into an efficient, large-scale smoking reduction program featuring automated data from electronic medical records, computer-assisted telephone interviews, and tailored newsletters. The authors successfully developed a program that was consistently implemented as planned for 320 smokers in a managed care organization. The mapping of theory to intervention, data transfer and security procedures, and processes and strategies used to overcome challenges to intervention implementation should provide lessons learned for similar health promotion projects. Few intervention studies discuss details of how they translate theory into practice or how they integrate different modalities and collaborating institutions, but such integration is critical for project success.
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