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(searched for: doi:10.1300/j456v02n03_06)
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, Shannon Shoemaker, Catherine R. Barber, Aaliyah Gibbons
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health pp 1-15; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2021.1916668

Abstract:
Author and article publication characteristics in the Journal of Creativity in Mental Health were reviewed from the first 12 years of the journal’s publication history for this meta-study. Results were coded and statistically analyzed to identify trends in areas such as number of authors, sex of authors, employment setting, departmental affiliation, topical content, publication year, and types of research including research design, sample size, types of participants, and statistical procedures.
, Courtland C. Lee
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, Volume 14, pp 510-518; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2019.1632767

Abstract:
A counselor’s understanding of a client’s identity is crucial in culturally competent counseling. When counselors conceptualize clients from a singular lens, they may develop clinical blind spots in which crucial components of identity and context are ignored, the lived experience is missed, and counseling effectiveness becomes difficult to attain. In this article, the concept of intersectionality and its importance to counseling practice is discussed. Further, three creative interventions to explore intersectionality are presented. Finally, implications and recommendations for counselor education, supervision, and practice are explored.
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, Volume 13, pp 306-317; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2018.1433092

Abstract:
As counseling curricula evolve in future years, the idea of including the topics of creative thinking and problem-solving in coursework is explored by the researcher. These domains, along with the broader topic of creativity in general, are embedded in the counseling process and many of its theories. Reasons for consideration are discussed, including the importance of creativity to the counseling profession, the relationship between wellness and creativity, and the spanning of creativity across cultures.
, Varunee Faii Sangganjanavanich
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, Volume 9, pp 245-261; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2013.879756

Abstract:
This column is designed to underscore relationally-based creative interventions used by counselors and psychotherapists in their practices. Our intention is to provide examples of novel, innovative ways of working with clients in their efforts to deepen self-awareness and their connections with others. Although the interventions within this column will be presented in a linear “how to” manner, an essentional premise of this column is that interventions submitted for publication have a contextual and relational basis. Basic to this column is the therapeutic focus of working through latent hurts and impediments to our clients’ health and happiness. Client goals generally involve creating the requisite emotional space needed for genuine relational choice for connection to manifest. If you have created a useful therapy tool, or if you have adapted an existing creative tool that you would like to share with readers, please follow submission guidelines in the author information packet available at http://www.creativecounselor.org/Journal.html. In this article, the authors outline the key concepts and structure of a creative intervention based on relational-cultural theory (RCT). This intervention, creating a recipe for change, offers counselors a way to promote connection with clients in the therapeutic context and empower them to work through chronic disconnection and condemned isolation in their relations with others. The authors provide a case illustration to highlight the 5 phases of the intervention and its application to RCT.
Cheryl L. Shiflett, Theodore P. Remley
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, Volume 9, pp 33-52; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2013.878680

Abstract:
While the counseling community embraces the use of creative approaches in counseling and supervision, few researchers have attempted to empirically describe the process of including an art-based technique into counselor group supervision. A grounded theory design guided the exploration of including a case conceptualization drawing technique into six counselor supervision groups. Six doctoral-level supervisors, who were trained in an art-based technique, introduced the method to their group supervisees who were completing a practicum or internship. Data collection methods included individual and focus-group interviews, observations of visual case presentations, document reviews of visual case drawings, and journal-prompted inquiries. Results indicated that supervisor training in an art-based technique is a condition for yielding positive outcomes for counselor trainee development, client treatment, and the supervision group process.
Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, Volume 6, pp 149-165; https://doi.org/10.1080/15401383.2011.579875

Abstract:
This column is designed to underscore relationally based creative teaching practices used by counselor educators in the classroom. Our intention is to provide examples of novel, innovative ways for counselor educators and students to deepen their learning while collaborating toward a spirit of connection and cooperation. If you have implemented a creative teaching method or if you have adapted an existing method that you would like to share with readers, please follow submission guidelines in the author information packet available at http://www.creativecounselor.org/Journal.html The benefits of creativity in counseling have been proclaimed by authors; however, training on creativity is sparse. Some literature exists on ways to implement a course on creativity in counseling, and certain counseling programs have incorporated classes and workshops on creativity in master's-level counseling programs. Still, there has been a call for more detailed descriptions for teaching the arts in counseling. In addition, bridging the gap between academia and creativity has been cited as an important consideration for educators interested in creativity in counseling ( Carson & Becker, 2004 Carson, D. K., & Becker, K. W. (2004). When lightning strikes: Reexamining creativity in psychotherapy. Journal of Counseling & Development, 82, 111–115. http://www.counseling.org/Publications/Journals.aspx (http://www.counseling.org/Publications/Journals.aspx) [Google Scholar] ). This article is an answer to the call for more detailed descriptions for teaching creativity in counselor education. As well, it details how to bridge the gap between academia and creativity.
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