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(searched for: doi:10.3390/genes13010101)
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Published: 21 June 2022
by MDPI
Abstract:
De Magalhães has shown recently that most human genes have several papers in PubMed mentioning cancer, leading the author to suggest that every gene is associated with cancer, a conclusion that contradicts the widely held view that cancer is driven by a limited number of cancer genes, whereas the majority of genes are just bystanders in carcinogenesis. We have analyzed PubMed to decide whether publication metrics supports the distinction of bystander genes and cancer genes. The dynamics of publications on known cancer genes followed a similar pattern: seminal discoveries triggered a burst of cancer-related publications that validated and expanded the discovery, resulting in a rise both in the number and proportion of cancer-related publications on that gene. The dynamics of publications on bystander genes was markedly different. Although there is a slow but continuous time-dependent rise in the proportion of papers mentioning cancer, this phenomenon just reflects the increasing publication bias that favors cancer research. Despite this bias, the proportion of cancer papers on bystander genes remains low. Here, we show that the distinctive publication dynamics of cancer genes and bystander genes may be used for the identification of cancer genes.
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Volume 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23074017

Abstract:
In view of unified cell bioenergetics, cell bioenergetic problems related to cell overenergization can cause excessive disturbances in current cell fate and, as a result, lead to a change of cell-fate. At the onset of the problem, cell overenergization of multicellular organisms (especially overenergization of mitochondria) is solved inter alia by activation and then stimulation of the reversible Crabtree effect by cells. Unfortunately, this apparently good solution can also lead to a much bigger problem when, despite the activation of the Crabtree effect, cell overenergization persists for a long time. In such a case, cancer transformation, along with the Warburg effect, may occur to further reduce or stop the charging of mitochondria by high-energy molecules. Understanding the phenomena of cancer transformation and cancer development has become a real challenge for humanity. To date, many models have been developed to understand cancer-related mechanisms. Nowadays, combining all these models into one coherent universal model of cancer transformation and development can be considered a new challenge. In this light, the aim of this article is to present such a potentially universal model supported by a proposed new model of cellular functionality evolution. The methods of fighting cancer resulting from unified cell bioenergetics and the two presented models are also considered.
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