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(searched for: doi:10.4103/idoj.idoj_259_19)
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Published: 21 February 2022
by MDPI
Clinics and Practice, Volume 12, pp 140-146; https://doi.org/10.3390/clinpract12010018

Abstract:
Corticosteroids are one of the anti-inflammatory drugs that are used widely by dermatologists. Significant local adverse effects can happen if topical corticosteroids (TCs) are used incorrectly. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of facial TCs misuse and its adverse effects. This was cross-sectional research: a self-reported questionnaire was distributed among a population of Saudi Arabians aged 16 years and above who were using TCs consecutively. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 26. A total of 611 participants were enrolled in the survey: 401 (65.6%) were university graduates, while 187 (30.6%) were below high school level of education. The number of participants using TCs was 279 (45.7%), while 332 (54.3%) did not use steroids topically. The most used TCs were Mometasone furoate 0.1% cream (18.2%), followed by Fusidic acid/Betamethasone cream (16.7%). A total of 46 reported facial TCs’ side effects. Peeling (52.2%) was the most reported side effect, followed by redness (41.3%). In conclusion, the use of facial TCs among the Saudi population is not uncommon (16.5%). A large population are not aware of the side effects of the unsupervised use of TCs. An effort should be made to increase awareness of the adverse effects of TCs.
Sheenam Sethi, Payal Chauhan, , Yashwant Singh Bisht
Indian journal of dermatology, venereology and leprology, Volume 88, pp 40-46; https://doi.org/10.25259/ijdvl_11_2020

Abstract:
Background: Topical corticosteroid (TCS) abuse is rampant and results in steroid addiction labeled as topical steroid-dependent or damaged face (TSDF). Indian market is replete with triple combination creams containing TCS sold as over-the-counter products at low cost, luring people to use them without prescription. The resultant damage if detected late is irreversible and difficult to treat. Dermoscopy can help in the early identification of features of TSDF at a preclinical stage resulting in better prognosis. However, the literature on the same is limited. Aims: This study is undertaken to characterize dermoscopic features of TSDF and to correlate them with potency and duration of application of the TCS. Methods: One hundred and thirty-two patients aged 18 years or above, with clinical symptoms and signs suggestive of TSDF and with history of application of TCS on the face for a period of more than one month, were enrolled in the study. Their demographic details, clinical features, and dermoscopy findings were recorded using a predesigned structured format. Comparison of dermoscopic findings with clinical examination, gender, potency of TCS, and duration of TCS use was done using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and one-tailed Z-test. Results: Mean age of the patients was 31.7 ± 8.1 years. Male to female ratio was 2:9. Sixty-nine (52.3%) patients abused TCS for more than one year. Clinical findings noted in the patients were erythema (81.1%), hyperpigmentation (80.3%), and hypertrichosis (68.2%). The most common dermoscopy findings seen were brown globules (96.2%), red diffuse areas (92.4%), vessels (87.1%), white structureless areas (86.4%), and hypertrichosis (80.3%). Red diffuse areas, vessels, brown globules, white structureless areas, and white hair were observed in a statistically higher proportion of cases dermoscopically. Y-shaped vessels and brown globules were seen in significantly higher number of patients, using TCS for more than three months and in those continuing it beyond six months, polygonal vessels were predominant. Limitations: Lack of histopathological correlation is the limitation of our study. Furthermore, brown globules seen in 96.2% patients of TSDF on dermoscopy may have been over-estimated and not always signify TSDF; instead, it could represent melasma for which patient applied TCS. Conclusion: Dermoscopy in TSDF can help dermatologists in a multitude of ways from confirming the diagnosis to differentiating from other causes of red face and predicting the approximate duration of TCS abuse.
Jonwei Hwang,
Published: 4 February 2021
Journal of Dermatological Treatment, Volume 33, pp 1293-1298; https://doi.org/10.1080/09546634.2021.1882659

Abstract:
Topical corticosteroid withdrawal is an entity associated with chronic steroid use and misuse that has not been fully described. To further characterize this entity, elucidate relevant clinical features, and investigate possible treatments we provided an update to a systematic review done in 2015. We searched Ovid Medline, Pubmed, and Cochrane library for terms related to topical corticosteroid withdrawal from April 2014 to September 2020. This entity usually occurs after prolonged use of moderate- to high-intensity topical steroid usage usually on the face. It is most common in women and many patients present due to improper use such as for cosmetic reasons. Symptoms include erythema, itchiness, and burning; secondary lesions are common scales. Due to the paucity of available study, we elected to include all articles found which led to limitations being lack of heterogeneity, diversity of outcome measures reported, and a higher risk of bias in some included studies. Topical corticosteroid withdrawal should be suspected in patients presenting with prolonged usage, erythema, and burning or itch. Patient education and follow up is important to address improper usage. Future studies should focus on comparison group studies to investigate treatment and risk factors.
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