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(searched for: doi:10.1145/3471621.3471860)
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Rama Adithya Varanasi, Joyojeet Pal, Aditya Vashistha
Published: 29 April 2022
Abstract:
Social media has witnessed an unprecedented growth in users based in low-income communities in the Global South. However, much remains unknown about the drivers of misinformation in such communities. To fill this gap, we conducted an interview-based study to examine how rural and urban communities in India engage with misinformation on WhatsApp. We found that misinformation led to bitterness and conflict – rural users who had higher social status heavily influenced the perceptions and engagement of marginalized members. While urban users relied on the expertise of gatekeepers for verification, rural users engaged in collective deliberations in offline spaces. Both rural and urban users knowingly forwarded misinformation. However, rural users propagated hyperlocal misinformation, whereas urban users forwarded misinformation to reduce their efforts to assess information credibility. Using a public sphere lens, we propose that the reactions to misinformation provide a view of Indian society and its schisms around class, urbanity, and social interactions.
Dilrukshi Gamage, James Stomber, Farnaz Jahanbakhsh, Bill Skeet, Gautam Kishore Shahi
Published: 27 April 2022
Abstract:
Misinformation and disinformation are proliferating in societies compromising our ability to make informed decisions. Currently a myriad of tools, technologies, and interventions are designed to aid users in making informed decisions when they encounter content of dubious credibility. However, with the advancement of technology, new forms of fake media are emerging such as deepfakes and cheapfakes containing synthetic images, videos, and audio. Combating these new forms of fake media requires tools and interventions understanding the new context. In this case, designers and developers of these tools need to examine user experience and perspectives on new contexts and understand multidisciplinary view points before designing any tools. This workshop calls for multidisciplinary participation to interrogate the current landscape of misinformation tools and to work towards understanding nuances of user experience of these new fake media and perceptions of tools that support users to distinguish credible from inaccurate content. This workshop intends to solicit a human-centric design framework which can act as a UX design guideline when designing and developing tools for combating mis/disinformation.
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